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March 12, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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EED HAT
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For Spring are Here

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CLOSING RULE EXPLAINED
BILLIARD COMMITTEE CHAIRMANr
OF UNION TELLS OF 11 O'CLOCK
LIJIT.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
It has come to the attention of the
billiard committee of the University
of Michigan Union that the 11 o'clock
closing rule which makes it necess-
ary for those in charge of the room,
to turn out the lights and to stop all
playing at that hour has been the,
subject of some criticism by a few
that, frequent the Union.
The house committee believing that
such organizations as the Union were;
subjected to the law which requires
public pool halls to close their es-
tablishments at 11 o'clock, set that
hour as the closing time for their own
room. They had given strict orders
to Mr. Taylor to see that their rule
was not violated. The attendants
were only carrying out the instruc-
tions of their superiors by turning
out the lights promptly.
Although the house committee was
wrong in their belief that the Union
came under the pool roon? law, there
are numerous other reasons for keep-
ing the closing hour at 11 o'clock.
If such is to be6 the time it necessar-
ily follows that the lights will have
to be put out within a few minutes of
the hour. It Rwould of course be im-
possible to extend the time indefinite-
ly to await the finish of a game, as the
students who are employed behind the
desk and to clean off the tables must
attend classes and ,have studies to get
out.

idea that it is no more than fair for
a woman to use the same- tactics -in
her business of life, including the ma-
trimonial game, as man does in his.
The story is attractively told in a
number of magnificient and elaborate
scenes.
St. Clair County Students to Meet
The St. Clair County club will hold
its second meeting next Tuesday night
at the Union. Organization will be
effected and plans for the club dis-
cu sed. The meeting is open to both
men and women from St. Clair
county.
Students of all Colleges should read
page four of the Students' Directory
and sign their names in the space for
that purpose.-Adv.

The Great HOUDINI
i'
"THE GRIM GAME"

MAJESTIC
FRIDAY--SATURDAY

*

I'

WUERTH THEATRE
Thurs-Fri- 1-12-All spar cast in "The
Qay Old Dog" with a comedy, "Good,
Little Brownie."
Sat-13--"Mother Love and the Law"
with a dews weekly and comedy.
Sun-Mon-Tues-14- 15-16-Esie Janis in
"The Imp" also a "Snub" Pollard com-
edy and colored review.,
Wed-Thurs-17-18-H. B. Warner in
"For a Woman's Honor" with a kino-
gram weekly and comedy.
Fri-Sat-19-20-Zazu Pitts in "Seeing It
Through" also news weekly and comedy.

~~Garricketroit
SLamis Mann in "FRIENDLY ENEMIES"
_ n
:'i1 11 iiiiii 11111 i 1 t lIEltt IIIIIIIU11

ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00. 3:30, 7.00. 8:30. 10:00
Thurs-Fri-11-12-Frank Mayo in "The
Brute Breaker" with a news and comedy.
Sat-13-Eugene O'Brien in "Broken
Melody" with a screen magazine and
.comedy.
Sun-Mon-14-15-Nazimova in "Eye for
Eye" (return date).
Tues-Wed-16- 17-Madlaine Traverse in
"The Hell Ship" with a Mutt and Jeff
cartoon comedy and. Craig Kennedy
stories.
Thurs-Fri-18-19-Monroe Salisbury in
"His Divorced Wife" with a news and
comedy.'

11

I1

PAGING ALL ST UDENTS !!I
FROM
GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN
Please call No. 258 between 6 and
7 P. M. and ask for George B.
Wilson
WILSON HAS AN IMPORTANT
MSSAG[ [OR YOU.
PHfONE 258

I,

"HUBET AL JOLSON in
'DETROIT . "SIWBAD",

4 I' I1 "

""I

Wadha 's & Co.

i

ANN ARBOR CHOP SUET
Ex ellent CHOP SUET from
11:30 a. m. to midnlght
Steaks and Chops $14 S. state

SONLANDERER & SEYFRIED
JEWELERS
uN - Of -
=f. Quality And Service
113 s.Liberty St.
Ann Arbor. Mich.

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STHEETTRE UESDAY
WIIT

Now

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NO T A MOTION PICTURE

OLIVER MOROSCO PRESENTS

tThe committee assures allpatrons
that the utmost courtesy will, at all
times be shown them, but the rules of
the billiard room will have to be en-
forced, and playing will have to 'stop
at 11 o'clock.
D. B. LANDIS,
Chairman,Billiard Committee.

FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN

TODAY AND TOMORROW
SEE HOW THE WHEELS GO 'ROUND IN SO-CALLED "HIGH

SOCIETY"

AND
3-V L

BA Y N E

The Stage
THE WHITNEY

iI

APPEARING IN PFRSON
THE FACSINATINC MYSTERY PLAY
'THE. MASrTER THIEF"
ROM THE FAMOUS "PAYMASTERS" STORIES
)F RICHARD WASHBURN CHILD.
THRILLS! MYSTERY!
SURPRISES!
PRICES: LOWER FLOOR $1,00, BALCONY,$1OO.$1.50 ,GALLERY75c
111IIInIIIIt lllllll11llliililltlI I## IIIillillll lllH I#I# tll ll l t####ltlI
HITNEYV A TURDAY MARCH 13
THEATRE U ll Y ililRlUi ii U
Another "SOME TIME" Direct from Chicago}

Coming to Apn Arbor after a three
months' run at the Garrick, theater in
Chicago, Arthur Hammerstein's mus-
ical fantasy, "Somebody's Sweet-
heart,"'will appear tomorrow might at
the Whitney. Prominent in the cast
are Violet Beasey, Berta Donn, Gen-
evia Davis, Sylvia Tell, Charles O'-
Connor, Burton Lenihan, George Dun-
ston, John Dewey, William Hovell,
and Will Adams, while the chorus is
declared to be not only of unusual
beauty but also to be possessed of
singing voices of rare quality.
Alonzo Price wrote the book and
lyrics for "Somebody's Sweetheart,"
co-operating with Antonio Bafunno,
who composed the music. Among the
songs that are especially catchy and
effective are "Somebody's Sweet-
heart," "It Gets ThemeAll," "Twinkle"
and "Girl of My Heart."
The Screen
THE MAJESTIC
Having repeatedly demonstrated
his ability to free himself from hand-
cuffs,' sealed boxes,, ropes, and other
retaining devices in the vaudeville
stage and out of doors, Harry Houdini
will be shown in his first motion pic-
ture, "The Grim Game," today and
tomorrow at the Majestic.
"The Grim Game" was written by
Arthur B. Reeve, the creator of Craig
Kennedy and his scientific detective
discoveries, assisted by John W. Gray.
It is built around the mysterious death
of a millionaire, who was the center
of three different sets' of circumstanc-
es.
By attempting to advance his stand-
ing as a reporter the nephew of the
deceased man brings jail confinement
on himself, but after a number of ex-
citing scenes he is cleared and the
real criminal is punished.

Why did you
marry your "hus-
band? Because
of Loveor were
you playing "the,
Woman Game" ?
Is "The Wo-
man Game as
honorable as the
Man's Game?
She played
and won. It was
"The Woman
Game." The
weapon she start-
ed to use was de-
ceit, - but Dan
Cupid stepped in
and changed the
system.

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In "The Wo-
man Game,"
if you Win you
Lose, and if you
Lose you Win.
Strange, isn't it?
All's fair in
Love and War
-and "The
Woman Game." -
Men are often
ruthless in busi-
ness. Dare wo-
men be ruthless
in the game so-
ciety compels
them to play?
The problem is
nicely pub in
"The Woman
Game."

A RET" ~DBIG6A'HITA~

N HIAH
HH
HH
H
vTAK WOMAN,,.
GAM[" H
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It's a Great
picture!
LET'S GO!

It's Elaine at
Her Best!1
LET'S GO!

,, _

ARTHUR HAMMERSTEINS,
/II AR/O/S and TUNEFUL
A
DFFERE
;OOK LYR/CS -y NRv'9NNTs
AZONZO Pf/c . /A
A'/1S/C6y 4lNTON/V 9O NEW /ORA'

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raga=gasza az cz=aazzaaxza

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RULE
'I
"

HOW TO PLAY "THE WOMAN GAME"
1-After looking over the field thoroughly, select your victim.
2.-Make careful note of the habits, customs, likes and dislikes of your prey.
3.-Act accordingly.
4.-Pay, more attention to him thaft you do your dog.
5.-Be sympathetic. Pet the brute. Laugh at his jokes. Humor him.
6.-Flirt just enough to make him a wee bit jealous. (Warning!' Don't over-do
this 'part.)
7.-Openly oppose the.custom of mothers visiting their married daughters.
8.-Make hin'believe you UNDERSTAND him. (This is sure-fire.)
9.-If he is accustomed to the quiet life, a vampy manner with a dash of "jazz"
may appeal by force of contrast. If he is of the tango-lizzard type, an
outward simulation of innocence and unsophistication may prove effect-
ive.

i
!
,;

THE ARCADE

.,

THREE MONTHS IN CHICAGO
HAMMERSTEIN AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA
2W BROADWAY'S MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRLS

Elaine Hammerstein, who made her
successful stellar debut in "Erst-
while Susan," will be shown in "The
Woman Game," a photoplay which
was written especially (for her by
Leighton Osmun and Frank Dazey, to-
day and tomorrow at the Arcade.
"The Wonmn Game" is based on the

" 10.-Make him take you to see "THE WOMAN GAME."

Also

MR. AND MRS. CARTER"DeHAVEN' in "MOVING DAY" -A Riot of Fun!

SEATS ON SALE THURS.

PRICEs, 75c4$1.00-$1.50-$2.00'

Y 111 .01 Iw oi l l I 1 0110 ..

Now"

'DI

Strengthen

old friendships

Portraits
orit
9pualIity

with a new portrait- The
gift that exacts nothing in
return, yet has a value, that
can only be estimated in
kindly thoughtfulness.
Make an Appoilntme Today

Phone 6D4W
STUDIO 619 EAST
LIBERTY. STREET

.4

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