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March 11, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-11

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
AY AND) NIGT WIRE
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1920.

PRICE THREE CENTS

h DUE
[HEAO3

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UNIV

'v OF

ATION
BLARES

10,000,000 People
ates Who Cannot
-Dr. Jessup

in

BY Associated Press)
t, March 10.-Bolshevism andj
dical doctrines are .flourish-
certain parts of this country
of the large number of it-
William S. Jessup, president
JnivArsity of Iowa, told the1
ty of Michigan club in an ad-
re today.
fast Provide Liberally
cure is in universal education
provide for that, educational
ms of the country must be
erally provided for. The urge
resent day economic situation
asible for a lack of full reali-
f the importance of -educa-
ssup said there were in the
tates between 8,000,000 and
0 who can neither read nor
iother 10,000,000 can read only
egree possessed by the ordi-
ld in the fourth grade of our
ry schools.
Normal Schools Short
:rmal schools of the country
e than 10,000 studeats short,
00 teachers are now working
certificates, he declared.
ation may seem to be expen-
t the fact remains," Dr. Jes-
t, "that we are not paying
o get the right kind of teach-
dough of them."

PRW'ESSOR EMERITUS J. B. DAVIS

YTS FUTUREl

Peace Conference to Work Out Military
Details; Armenia Included
London, March 10.-The Peace Con-
ference spent the day in trying to
work out the details of military and,
naval plans in connection with Tur-
key, giving particular attention to
Armenia. Beatty, Winston Churchill,
secretary for war, and others were
called to give their opinions. Premier
Venizelos of~ Greece was also pres-
ent and again insisted that the allies
should take the sternest measure's
against the sultan*
The .general plan of action was not
changed, however; as a result of the
conference. It became known today
that the military demonstration at
Constantinople is likely to take the
form of allied military control of cer-
tain TurkIsh governmental activi-
ties, afoong :them the war department.
The conferees were careful to make
clear that this does not mean the
taking over of the Turkish govern-
ment at the outset, and would not in
the future if Turkey shows an inch-
nation to abide by the terms of the
armistice and cease massacres.
COMMITTEE DESIRES RETURN OF
HOP TICKETS NOT TO BE USED
Announcement was made last night
that the J-Hop committee is desirous of
securing all Hop tickets which, due
to the postponement of the date, may
not now be used. Any one who knows
definitely that he will not be able to
use his ticket is' asked to turn it in
before )Ionday night to R. J. Dillon
or R. E. McKean. Dillon may be
reached by phone at 976-J and Mc-
Kean at 231: Refund will be made on
all tickets turned in.
It is also requested that any frater-
nities or campus organizations who had
contracted for Hop booths and now
find themselves unable to use them,
inform the committee of the fact at
once. Refund will be made for all
booth orders cancelled before Monday;
night.
Rochester Club to Plan Pinner
Plans for an alumni-underg'radu-
ate banquet to be given during the
spring recess will be considered at a

PoRFU AGLER SAS
WIEMA EIGIBLE
Coaching at Los Angeles High School
Not of Professional Nas
ture
EX-CAPTAIN NOT PAID FOR
HIGH SCHOOL SPORT SERVICE
Rumors that "Tad" Wieman, half-
back on the Varsity football teams of
'16 and '17 and captain-elect for the
team of '18, would be ineligible for the
team when he returns this next fall,'
were denied after investigation by
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman of
the .athletic board.
Prof. Aigler Makes Statement
Professor Aigler's statement is as
follows: "When the report first came
that Wieman had taken a position
with the Los Angeles high school and
was coaching the school football team
many concluded that he had thereby
lost his amateur standing. I have
taken occasion to look into the situa-
tion very thoroughly and the fact is
that Wieman's athletic ability
played no part in securing the position
with the high school and his coaching
was done wholly gratuitously.
Work Was Gratuitous
"His work with the football teair
was-no part of his duties and he re-
ceived no compensation for ha'ndling
it., He did exactly the same work
that other teachers in the high school
were doing and received therefor ex-
actly the samve pay received by other
teachers of like experience. le coach-
ed the football team because he en-
joyed athletics and dealing with bys,
not because he was paid for it,.either
dircctly or indirectly."
Left Here in 1918
Wieman left school at the second
semester in '18 to join the ai' serv-
ice in which he received a commis-
sion. This fall he started teaching in
Los Angeles and has made up his
mind to return next fall to complete
his remaining year in the college of
literature.
AWARD ALL-FRESH
SQUAD NUMERALS
Numerals and sweaters were
awarded to 20 members of the All-
fresh football team last night, at their
dinner held at the Union. The pre-
sentation was made by Coach Mather,
the following' men receiving sweat-
ers:
Capt. Herbert . Dunphy, Grenville
Andrews, Bennett Avery, Ralph Bren-
ner, Franklin Cappon, B.. Clauser,
William Colburn, H. M. Clark, Paul
Goebel, George Johnston, James
Johns, Charles McEllren, Victor Meth-
od, Meyer Paper, Robert Rankin,1
Richard Rowland, Johh Searle, Wil-
liam VanOrden, and Horace Wachter.
Capts. Angus Goetz, '22M, of the
Varsity squad, and Herbert Dunphy;,
'23, of the freshman squad, gave talks,
in which they laid plans for future
joint- monthly dinners for both1
squads. Coaches Lundgreq and Math-
er were on the list of speakers. The
point most, emphasized by all giving1
talks was' the necessity of observing
training rules through the summer
months, when not under the supervi-
sion of the coaches. A few of the
members of last year's Varsity were

Journalism Fraternity to
College Newspapers
Michigan

.AY HOLD MEETING OF STATE
EDITORS HERE THIS SPRING
Temporary plans for the formation
of a state intercollegiatemnews associa-
tioii were made at the Sigma Delta
Chi luncheon yesterday non at the
'Union. A committee was appointed
to investigate the probabilities of such
an organization in the state of Mich-
igan and report at the next meet-
ing of the journalistic fraternity,
March 24.
Would Aid in Securing News
, It has been estimated there are be-
tween 20 and 30 college publications
An the state which would enter into
the association. Among the purposes
of the association would be to foster
better relationships beween the state
'college publications, to aid each mem-
ber in secring news of the different
colleges, and to send out college news
to metropolitan newspapers.
It is probable that a convention will
be called in Ann Arbor sometime this
'spring, at whlch representatives of all
the state college publications will be
invited to attend. Faculty men of the
,ournalistic department of the Univer-
sity, editors of metropolitan papers,
and other prominent men will give
talks.
Elect Officers
The following officers for the
Michigan chapter of Sigma Delta Chii
were elected at the luncheon: Presi-
dent, Russell Barnes, '20; vice-presi-
dent, Bruce Millar, '20; secretary,
John E. McManis, '21; treasurer, Lee
M. Woodruff, '21.
PROFS. LA RtUE AND BLANCHARD'
TO ADDRESS ZOOLOGY CLUB
Prof. G. It LaRue of the zoology de-
partment, will present a review of
several papers on the life history of
nemotodes at the meeting of the Zoo-
logical Journal club to. be held at 7:30
o'clock Thursday evening in room 231
of the Natural Science building.,.
Prof. F. N. Blanchard of the botany
department, will also read a report on
"A Case of Melanism in Bull Snakes."
Lavinia MacBride and W. K. Bowen,
grads., will also present reports. The
meeting will be open to all interested.
TO ORGANIZE JOHNSON CLUB
IN MEETING IN LANE HALL
Organization of the Johnson-for-
President league on the campus will
be effected Thursday night at a meet-
ing at Lane hall instead of in the
sUnion as previously announced. The
,meeting will be at 7:30 o'clock.
A representative from the state
Johnson-for-President league will be.
at the meeting with a representative
from the county organization to
speak before the meeting. Commit-
tees will be appointed and other im-
portant matters will be discussed.
Report'40 Inches of Frost in Ground
According to a statement given out
from the Court house today, there is
40 inches of frost in the ground at the
present.time. This is said to be un-
usual for this time of year.

SIGMA DELTA CKI
jPLANS' NEWS ASSN,

Organize
in

PRF. IM EL ELECTED
TREASUREROF ORATORS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION CHOOSES
MICHIGAN MAN As
OFFICER
Mr. Ray K. Immel of the oratory
department has been elected treasur-
er of the National Association of
Teachers of Speech, the first time that
a Michigan man has been officially
connected with that organization.
Mr. Immel was also made business
manager of the publication put out
by the association, "The Quarterly
Journal of Speech Education.''
The National Association of Teach-
ers of Speech is an organization of
instructors in and those connected
with the teaching of speech. Five years
ago it broke away from the English'
council, the national organization of
teachers of English, to form an organ-
ization for, those interested in the
teaching of oratory alone.
The Journal has been published
quarterly since the beginning of the
-association and treats subjects other
than those dirpctly connected with
oratory. Amateur theatricals, defects
in speech, and other similar subjects
besides oratory are dealt with in-its
articles.
For the rest of this semester Mr.
Immel's University work will, in part,
be done by other men of the depart-
ment, as his duties in his new office
will take considerable time at first.
Prof. Thomas. C. Trueblood will take
part of his work, while Mr. Louis Eich
and Mr. George D. Wilner will be in
charge of the debates and Northern
Oratorical league contes't, respectively.
BOND ISSUE FOR PAING
S O lDUSDANGEROUS
HOUSE LEADER DECLARES PANIC
WOULD PROBABLY
RESULT
Washington, March 10.-A bond is-
sue to pay adjusted compensation to
former service men, Republican-Lead-
er Mondell of Wyoming told the House
Ways and Means committee today,
"would endanger a panic and send
prices ballooning."
He opposed such legislation at this
time on the grounds that heavy addi-'
tional taxes would be necessary what-
ever plan of relief was adopted.
Representative Swope, Republican
of. Kentucky, urged the adoption of a
bill granting an extra year's pay to
all those in the service, except men
who served less than two months. He
estimated that- such a plan would re-
quire an outlay of $1,350,000,000.
Soldier relief also came up in the.
senate, where opponents of such leg-
islation outnumbered those advocat-
ing it.
COOLEY CLUB TO PRESENT
STATE VS. BAILEY TkNIGHT
State vs. Bailey is the title of a
trial to be presented by the Cooley
club Thursday evening in' the law
school court room, in which the state
will attempt to convict the defendant
of murder in the first degree.
Attorneys for the state are to be
H. F. Lagle, '22L, and E. E. Kincaide,
?22L and attorney for the defense, J.
M. Durbin, '22L.
WEST VIRGINIA VOTES FOR
U. S. SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT

Charlestown, West Va., March 10.-
The West Virginia legislature ratified
the federal suffrage amendment late
this afternoon. The vote) of Senator
Bloch, who made a hurried trip from
California to Charlestown to vote on
the amendment, was effectual in
breaking the deadlock - between pro
and anti-suffrage forces.
Seamless Tube Lecture Postponed
The lecture by Mr. Breckenridge on
the manufacture of seamless steedl
tubes, which was to have been given
last night, has been postponed until
7:30 o'clock tonight. The lecture,
which will be given in the Natural
Science auditorium, will be illustrated
by motion pictures showing the de-
velopment of steel tubing from ore to
the finished product.
Boxing Club to Meet Tonight
The Boxing club will hold a meet-,
ing at 7:15 tonight at the Union.

WAR FILM SHOWS
COMMITTEE'S WORK
The work of the American commit-
tee for devastated France was clearly
and interestingly shown in the film
"The Heritage of France" which was
presented.,last night at Hill auditor-
ium under the auspices of the Wom-
en's league of the University.
The film was made last summer in
the department of the Aisne and the
actors are the peasants of that dis-
trict. It show their life before and
after the invasion by the Germans
and the reconstruction now in pro-
gress.
After the showing of the film, Miss
Grace Parker of New York City told
of her experiences while working in
England and France during the war
and explained the need of American
aid to France. "America must keep
the faith of France and the American
committee for devastated France is
doing that by helping the people
back to their former state. The
French government is doing what
it can but there is much to be
done and the present poverty of
France makes aid imperative."
COL 61A151E TO TAK TO
LEGION MEN TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Overseas Headquarters
Special Orders, No. 1
From: R. W. Johnson, C. 0.
To: All overseas "vets."
Subject: Attack.
All overseas men of the Uni-
versity of Michigan will meet
at the Union at 7:30 P. M. to
make an attack on old Nicotine.
Zero hour: 8 P. M.
Equipment: One Smoke
I I Screen ticket.
Objective: , Two hours of real
"buddie" get-together.
By order of
R. W. JOHNSON,'
Commanding Officer.
WILLIAM STIRLING,
Adt.
Col. A. H. Gansser, Michigan Com-
mander of the American Legion, will
be the sp.eaker at the "Overseas
Smoke Screen" to-be held at 7:30 to-
inight at the Union. His subject will
be, "The American Legion."
' Col. A. H. Gansser was severely
wounded while serving with the 32nd
division in the Oise Aisne offensive.
On returning to his regiment he was
promoted for gallantry. -
' The smoker will be the first big
'mnass meeting of the overseas organ-
ization and between 300 and 500-stu-
'dents are expected to attend.
NEXT SUMMER'S CAMP DAVIS
MEN HEAR PROF. JOHNSTON
At the meeting of the men who ex-
pect to attend Camp Davis next sum-
mner, which was held in the Enginer-
ing building last night, Prof. C. F.
Johnston, -head of the surveying de-
partment, gave a talk on the various
aspects of camp life.
Under the chairmanship of J. F.
Walker, '20E, several of the\Camp Dav-
is alumni were obtained to speak on
the, different phases of cam life. G.
W. Francis, '20E, editor of e Black
Fly, the camp paper, E. P. Langen-
ham, '20E, sports director, C..E. Bot-

tum, '20E, and 'C. L. Stanley, '20E,.
spoke on various subjects in last
year's camp. A smoker is being plan-
ned for some later date.
'20 LAWS TO HOLD ANNUAL
CREASE DANCE MAY 7 IN GYM
May 7 is the date set at a recent
class meeting of the 'senior laws
for their annual Crease dance. It
will be informal according to a vote
taken at the meeting.
Arrangements for the dance are so
far incomplete but it was decided to
hold it in Barbour gymnasium. Furth-
er announcements will be made later.
Prof. Trueblood to Judge Debate
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood of the
oratory department will be in Colum-;
bus Friday to judge 'a varsity de-
debate. The contesting teams are
Ohio State and- the University of Wis-
consin.,

BEGAN

JOSEPH B, DAVIS;
PoROF EMERITUS,
DIES IN FLORlIDA

LONG

ILLNESS IS
CAUSE OF DEATH

WORK ON
FACULTY:
1872

Was First Vice-Dean of Engineering
College; Had Active
Career
(By J. A. B.)
Joseph Baker Davis, '68, professor
emeritus of the University of Michi-
gan, died Tuesday night at Braden-
.town, Fla., where he had been spend-
ing the winter, according to a mess-
age received yesterday by friends and
associates on the campus.
The death resulted from a number
of years of illness, friends -say. Al-
though it came as a surprise, Profes-
sor Davis' advanced years were felt
by many sufficient to have caused him
to succumb to the illness. He was
just 74 years, nine months, of age
when death came.
Spends Winter in Florida
It was customary for him, since
having retired from the active serv-
ice in the engineering faculty of the
University, to spend his winters in
Florida. Professor Davis' home is in
Dexter.
Professor Davis, after whom Camp
Davis, the summer camp for engi-
neers in northern Michigan, was
named, was retired from work on the
staff of the engineering school, fol-
lowing a most active career. With
the organization of the engineering
department as a separate school from
the literary cqllege, in 1895, Professor
Davis, at that time head of the sur-
veying department of the University,
,was made vice-dean of the engineer-
ing college. Later when the name of
the office was changed to associate
dean of the engineering department
he held this position. He was suc-
ceeded by the present Assistant Dean
Butts.
Graduated in 1868
Professor Davis was born July 31.,
1845, at Westport, Mass. His early
education was, attained in public
grammar and high schools of New
Bedford. It was in 1864 that he en-
tered the University of Michigan,
graduating in 1868 as a civil engi-
neer.
Government surveys of .the Great
Lakes which were made shortly after
he graduated called him into practi-
cal service. He assisted in survey-
ing the shore lineof Lake Superior.
in 1872 an appointment as assistant
professor off civil engineering was ten-
dered him in the University of Mich-
igan. He accepted, beginning his ca-
reer as an educator. In X1891 he was
made professor of Geodesy and Sur-
veying. He held this position until
-1895, when the engineering depart-
ment was separated from the literary
college, and he was promoted to the
office of Vice-Dean, of the same de-
partment.
Was Considered an Authority
During his career he was recog-
nized as an authority upon matters
pertaining to engineering and sur-
veying. Professor Davis was also
chief engineer for the state of Michi-
gan during the St. Clair laka survey;
He was a number of times elected
president of the Michigan Engineer-
ing society, and was-a member of the
American Society of Civil Engineer-
ing.
After having retired from service
in, the engineering department of the
University, he was succeeded as head
of the surveying iepartment by Pro-
fessor Clarence Johnston.
Besides his widow, one son, Charles
Baker Davis, Birmingham, Ala., sur-
Avives the death. The body vll be
accompanied to Ann Arbor for bur-
ial..
FIRST GRADUATE CLUB PARTY
OF SEMESTER TO BE FRIDAY

Graduate club will hold first party
of the semester, at 8 o'clock Friday,
at Lane hall. Prof. R. K. Immel of the
oratory department will give some
readings, a male quartette will furn-
ish music, and a committee will pro-
vide eats. Every graduate is invited.

UNIVERSITY
IN

.. f

at the affair, and were called
^ir -..L l lo-

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