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March 10, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-10

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OMEWHAT
R TODAY

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111

.DAY -AND
SE]

XXX. No. 113.,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1920.

PRIG

v

r

OT TO SPEAK
CHURCH MOVE
IR CO-OPERATION

Adelphi Condemns
Ruling of Regents

IS SON OF LATE PRESIDENT.
HARVARD UNIVE.R.
SITY

OF I

WILL HEAD PROGRAM
AT UNION SERVICE
Russell Carter to Supervise Musieal
Part of Ceremo.
nies
Speaking in connection with the;
present nationwide movement for co-
'operation among the churches, Mr.
Samuel Atkins Eliot, of Boston, Mass.,
will head the program of the fourth
University union services to be held
at 6:15 o'clock Sunday evening in Hill
auditorium. The exact topic of his
address has not yet been announced.
Mr. Eliot is the only surviving son
of the late Charles W. Eliot who was
for 35 years president of Harvard uni-
versity, and like his father has been
for several years the president of the
American Unitarian association. Es-
pecially noted for his skill as presid-
ing officer in great meetings, Mr. Eliot
is well known for his strong an4
forceful addresses and commanding
presence.
During the war he was the head of
one national war-work council, and
was in constant demand as a speaker
at many of the army camps. Frequent-
ly Mr. Eliot has been the university
preacher at Harvard, Speaking brief-
ly every day in Appleton chapel. It
was only through the repeated efforts
of Mr. Sidney S. Robins of the Uni-
tarian church that Mr. Eliot was se-
cured for these services, as he usu-7
ally spends the month of March work-
ing for the United States Indian com-
mission.-
The musical program for the union1
services has been arranged by Mr.
Russell Carter of the School of Mu-
sic, who will lead the singing. Prayer1
will be offered by Mr. Sidney S. Rob-
ins, pastor of the Unitarian church.
Mr. Ray K. Imniel of the oratory de-
partment will read a.passage from the
scriptures.

Condemnation of the existing rule
forbidding political speakers from us-
ing Hill auditorium was made by an-
other University organization last
night when the Adelphi Housd of Rep-
resentatives went on record as fol-
lows: "Resolved, that the ruling of the
Board of Regents prohibiting political
speeches in Hill auditorium should be
rescinded."
The Varsity debate question, "Re-
solved, that the laborers of all cor
porations should elect 'two-thirds, of
their own men to the board of direct-
ors of the corporation," will be dis-
cussed by the Adelphi House of Repre-.
sentatives next Tuesday evening.
HUNDREDS KILLED
BYI EARTHQUAKE,
Thousanis Left Homeless as Result of
Terrific Shock Near Tiflis,
Transcaucasia
ASSEMBLY VOTES 25,000,000
RUBLES TO AID SUFFERES1

1 MEN 'CHOSEN FOR
UNION VACANCIES'
McClintock, '211, and Zimmerman,
'02L, Become Di-
rectors
CONVENTION OF UNIVERSITY
UNIONS MAY BE IlELD HERE

(By Associated Press)
Tiflis, Transcaucasia, March 9. -
Several hundred persons are dad
and thousands of others are homeless
as a result of an earthquake today,
which destroyed Makhdt, Grakali, and
other villages within- a radius of 60
miles west of Tiflis,. .Transcausasia.
The city of Tiflis was shaken and
many buildings damaged.
Thousands of refugees are pouring
into this city. The constituent as-
sembly of the republic of Georgia im-
mediately voted 20,000,000 rubles for
first aid to the sufferers.
The railroad between Tiflis and
Batum was severely damaged by the
earth shock, while the station was de-
stroyed at Gori a short distance to
the northwest of Tiflis. The town of
Gori was virtually wiped out, and 100
dead have already been removed from
the wreckage. Twenty persons were
killed at Uplisjin.
AERO CLUB MAY ENTER PLANE
IN COMING AERIAI DERBY

Council Approves Committee For
Supervision Of Freshman Conduct

James I. McClintock, '21L, was
chosen Law vice-president of the
Union board of directors at the di-
rectors' meeting Tuesday to fill the
vacancy caused by the resignation of
Rollin Winslow, '20L.' Daniel Zim-
merman, '02L, succeeded Mr. Harry
Douglas, '90, as alumnus member of
the board. Mr. Douglas tendered his
resignation in order to be able to ren-
der better service on the board of gov-
ernors, and Winslow's retirement fol-
lows his graduation from the Law
school last semester. Both men are
to act until July 1, when the regular
elections are held. .
The general secretary of the Union
submitted a report relative to holding
in Ann Arbor a convention of uni-
versity unions and similar organiza-
tions. He stated that there are some
50 such organizations and that the
delegates would probably number 70,
all of whom would be given accommo-
dation at the Union. His report was
favorably' acted upon and he was au-
thorized to issue formal invitations
for such a convention, the date of
which will be determined later by the
board of directors.
Action was also taken with refer-
ence to the admittance "directors'
members" of the Union. Such mem-
bers will be representative men who
are not eligible for Union life mem-
bership. After application for mem-
bership And endorsement by two Union
members, 'the applicant's name will
be posted upon the Union bulletin
board for a period of four weeks, at
the end of which time his name will
be proposed for membership before the
board of directors. Provided no men-
ber of the Union can support objec-
tions to this membership and upon the
unanimous vote of the board of di-1
rectors, the man will be admitted to
Union membership. -
Hereafter the directors will meet at
11 o'clock on the second Saturday of
the month.
MAN ASPECTSOW
TO OE SHOWN TONIGHT

An organization to establish, Mich-
igan's traditions on a firmer basis
this spring has been effected by the
Student council committee on under-
class conduct. Lloyd Herth, '20TD,
chairman of the committee has sub-
mitted the following report which has
been accepted by the council:
Article 1
The name of this organization will
be the sophomore vigilance commit-
tee.
Article 2
It is composed of the sophomore
presidents of the various colleges on
the campus. and the men appointed by'
them, the number being ' proportioned
by the enrollment of the college.
Articel, 3
The object of this organization is
two-fold:
First, to compel the fi'eshmen to live
up to Michigan's \traditions; ,
Secondly, to abolish mob discipline
and also to check the sophomores by
the legislation of this committee.
Article 4
Rule 1. Freshmen who do not
live up to the traditions, when report-
ed will be warned by letter of their
misconduct.
Rule 2. 'On second offence with the
recommendation of the council he-
shall be disciplined by the members
of the committee in his college.
The members of the sophomore vig-
ilance committee are as follows:
Lits-M. Newton, J.. M. Barnes,
Jerome Dunne, Hugh Wilson, William
-Henderson, J. I. Dakin, L. P. Randall,
C. L. Pearman, Frank Steketee, L. W.'

Fuess, Walter Rea, Charles C. Merkle,
Curt Schnidef, David Beers, N. K.
Foley, and L. M. Cameron.
Engineers-A. L. May, T. A. Bel-
knap, J. M. Hade, R. Swart, W. B. Gil-
bert, H, L. Waha, M. M. Grylls, K. J.
Rankin, J. A. Riggs, R. C. Vail, Frank
Czysz, and R. Kerwin.
Architects-W. K. Rindge and Rob-
ert Ainsworth.
Pharmics-D. H. Eidson and Harry
Connell,
Dents-J. G. Naylor, C. R. Buell, H.
C. Eldredge, F. C. Naylor, and W. C.
Wilson.
To recall some of the traditions
to the mind& of the students the fol-
lowing have been reprinted:
1. Tip your hat to the President
and the dean of your college.
2. Wear your pot and your toque on
every day but Sunday.
3. Be respectful to upperclassmen.
- 4. Learn "The Yellow and Blue."
5. Be sporitsmanike at aill ath-
letic events.
6. Do not wear any prep school in-
signia.
7. Do not take part in mob hazing.
8., Do -not smoke an "M" pipe on
the campus.
SENATOR JOHNSON
'TO SPEA.K TUESDAY,

URGES
STOP

GOVERN
EXTRAVI

Will Deliver Two Addresses in
City, One Under National
Auspices

F-
COBNDI TION
SUPREME
FAVORS REDUCTI(
TO PRE-WAR F04
TATION OF Al

This

Declares Deflation of Cred
rency E ssential to
bilization
'By Associated Pr
London, March 9. - Th
Council has issued a mem
-world economic conditiom
clisions are as follows: "I
amount importance that p
tiotas should be fully and
restored at the earliest pc
ment throughout the world
Limit Armament
. "To achieve this it is de
peace and normal economic
should be established at I
moment possible througho
Europe,-that armies everyw
be reduced to a peace fc
armament should be limi
lowest possible figure comi
a measure of security, an
League of Nations should
to consider as soon as pC
posals to this end; that st
have been created er enlai
count of the war should i
establish fell credit and a
unrestricted exchange of c
in order that the essenti
European economic life may
paired by the erection o
barriers,
Suppress Extravaga
"Each government shou
ately consider means of u
its people in every branch
vital necessity' of suppress
agance and reducing expe:
as to bridge the gap which
between the demand and su
sential commodities. It i
that steps be taken to seci
flation of credit of current
"Provisions for raw ma
ing essential to the restora
dustries, - means should
whereby the countries wIh
the present conditions of i
al exchange unable to pur
the world markets, can o
mercial credit." -

REPUBLICAN CLUB
P L A N S MEETINGS
Organization of the new Republi-
can. club of the University was set
well on its way yesterday afternoon
at -the meeting of the executive com-
mittee held at the Union.
Under the chairmanship of. H. F.
Boron, '20, the 15 men on the commit-
tee drew up plans for the All-Repub-
lican mass meeting which is to be
held Monday. The following men
were appointed on the special com-
mittee to arrange for the meeting:
F. H. Lauder, '22L, chairman; J. G.
Frey, '22, G. W. Struckman, '20L, J.
E. Spier, '22L, C. G. Brandt, '21L, and
E. T. Edwards, '20. C. R. Osius, Jr.,
'20, was appointed as the publicity
committee.
Plans of the club, which is to con-
sist of all Republican students on the
campus, provide- for a number of
meetings and smokers at'which prom-
inent Republican candidates and party
leaders will speak. Major Morse, not-
ed Kentucky orator, is expected to ad-
dress Monday's meeting..
ORATORY CONTEST RESULTS
ANNOUNCED BY R. K. 1MME1,2
Announcements of the names of the
five students who were selected by
special judges to take part in the final
oratorical contest to be held in Uni-

"ie want to get hold of all those
in the University who might be inter-
ested in areo affairs as we are plan-
ning to pull off several interesting
events in the near future," declared
Mr. E. A. Terhune, Jr., of the Eastern
Aircraft corporation last night at a
meeting of the-Aeronautical club. "We
hope to be able to enter a plane from
Michigan in the approaching aerial
Derby and we need all the co-opera-
tion possible in order to do this."
Preceding this talk the club elected"
its permanent officers for the year as
follows: President, 0. J. .Hall, '23E.
vice-president, S. J. deFrance, '21E,
secretary, E. F. Boxell, '21E, treasur-
er, J. C. Morison,, '20E.
SMALL POX CASE CAUSES
VACCINATION AT HOSPITAL
A severe case of small pox, con-
tracted by one of the nurses at the
Homoeopathic hospital, has necessi-
tated the vaccination as a preventive
measure of all connected with the hos-
pital.
The unfortunate nurse is Fern
Dowding,. a junior in the hospital.
She was immediately removed to the
contagious ward last Friday when the
case was discovered and no new cases
have broken out so far.
ROUND-UP CLUB INITIATES
TWENTY-TWO UPPERCLASSMEN
Twenty-two upperclassmen were in-
itiated into the Round-Up club at its
meeting last night at the Union.
The annual initiation dance will be
given Saturday night, March 3, at the
Country club.

The terrifying, the humorous, the
cowardly, and the heroic aspects of
the late World war are to be depicted
at 7:30 o',lock tonight at Hill audi-
torium in the "Heritage of France,"
the famous war film which has the en-
dorsement of Generals Pershing and
Wood. This picture is to be shown
under the auspices of the Women's
league, which will give the proceedsl
to a fund for the rehabilitation of the
devastated portions of France. Miss
Grace Parker will lecture as the pic-
ture is shown. Music for the occasion
will be furnished by a trio from the
School of Music.
The picture was taken under the
supervision of the Allied governments
and show, Generals Joffre, Petain,
and Pershing in the performance of
their duties. It shows by actua 1
scenes the invasion, occupation, and
the retreat of the German hordes
from the devastated parts of France.
The plot is carried along by a few
professional actors, but the majority
of the parts are played by the French
men and women who were compelled
to remain during the German occu-
pation.
Tickets are being sold by all the
sororities, which wish to have it un-
derstood, however, that the exhibition
is not strictly a women's affair.
Movie to ,Show Manufacture of Tubing
A motion picture showing the man-
ufacture of Shelby seamless steel tub-
ing will be given at 7:30 tonight in
the auditorium of the Natural Science
building.
Small Roof Fire Occurs at 920 Monroe
A small roof fire at 920 Monroe was
extinguished by the fire department
with chemicals about 7:30 o'clock last
evening.

DEMANO FOR EDUCATED
GEOLOGISTS INCREASES
MEN NEEDED WITH EDUCATIONAL
FOUNDATION AND VEW-
POINT OF SCIENCE
New York, March 9.-There. has
been a marked and growing demand
in the last few years for men well
trained in geology who have at the
same time the educational foundation
and the point of view of the applied
science man represented by the engi-
neer, according to Dr. Charles P.
Berkey, professor of geology at Co-
lumbia university..
The general question of engineering
education, it was said at Columbia,
has been given careful study in re-
cent years. At Columbia the theory
is held that stidents should have col-
lege training before taking up the en-
gineering school work, and the Co-
lumbia requirements are such that all
students admitted -to the engineering
school must have had the c.uivalent
of three years of college work with'
thorough preparation in mathemat-
ics, physics and chemistry.
Engineers More Active
Engineers, it is pointed out by
members of the profession, are com-
ing to take a more active part in civic
affairs, and this, it is said, indicates
that the engineer of the future is like-
ly to be more liberally educated than
the engineer of the past.
The new type of geologist, by which
is meant the geologist with an in-
stinct for practical problems, and for,
furnishing prompt, definite and help-
ful advice, has made a place both for
himself and for his science, where the
more theoretical, or at least less prac-
tical, geologist of former days failed
to claim very serious attention.
Geology an Applied Science
Geology has become to a marked
degree in very recent years an ap-
plied science. It is well understood
that great numbers of so-called ac-
cidents in engineering and mining
work,'of calamitous or costly failures,
of excessive expense and delay, of in-
appropriate design and plan of ope-
ration, and of entirely mistaken or er-
roneous conception of the problem in
hand have been due to ignorance of,
or neglect of, the geological factors
involved quite as often as to mistakes.
on the strictly engineering questions.
A dam that is built, a tunnel that is
constructed, a mine that is developed,
a bridge, a pier or other heavy struc-
ture that is located, or a natural re-
source that is exploited without due
regard for all the geological condi-
tions, cannot succeed with the same
certainty that attends a proper con-I
sideration of these factors. This is the
field of the new type of engineering
mining geologist.

JOHNSON-FOR-PRESIDENT CLUB
ORGANIZED BY STUDENTS
Senator Hiram Johnson's appear-
ance next Tuesday in Ann Arbor was
anticipated last night by the forma-
tion of a Johnson-for-President club.
Plans were ,made to assist when the
senator arrives on Tuesday afternoon,
March 16, from Ypsilanti by auto.
At 5 o'clock he will address the stu-
dent body at a ,place to be announced
later, and at 6 o'clock will address a
county meeting given under national
auspices at the Union. Congressman
E. C. Michener as toastmaster will in.-
troduce the senator, who will speak
on, "Problems to Solve in America."
Further plans will be made by the
club at the next meeting at 7:30
o'clock on Thursday evening at the
.Union, where Congressman Louis
Crampton, who is conducting Senator
Johnson's campaign in Michigan, is
expected to be present. All interested
are invited to attend. -
Besides furthering the senator's
campaign on the 'campus, the club's
later plans include participation in
the mock convention in May. The of-
ficers of the club are: President,
W. C. Hall, '20L; vice-pres., J. C. Hod-
son, '21; and secretary, Carl G. Brandt,
'20L. At the *next meeting a com-
mittee will be "appointed to act in
each class and school in the Univer-
sity.
TICKETS FOR CHICAGO MEET
TO BE GIVEN OUT SATURDAY j

Tickets for the Chicago track meet,
scheduled for 8 o'clock Saturday night
in Waterman gymnasium, will be dis-
tributed from 1:30 to 5 o'clock Satur-
day afternoon in the corridor of Un-
iversity hall.
As only 2,200 tickets have been
printed for this event, officials of the
Athletic association urge that stu-
dents come early if expecting to ob-
tain the pasteboards. Athletic books
must be brought.
Local Man to Address Commerce Club
Mr. Jonah S. Scovel, treasurer and
manager of the firm of Dean & Co.,
Ltd., of Ann Arbor, will address t he
Commerce club at -7:40 tonight in
room 325 of the Union. Mr. Scovel
will explain the methods used by his

{
-+
I
{

RAILROADS AP
LABOR TO C
.(By Associated Pr
Washington, March 9.-
tives of railroad labor a
officials - will confer tomor
question of wages for the
in more than two years.
asking for the recognize
labor union and the as
railroad executives will n
range the preliminaries for
tion of a joint board which
out pending and future w
versies.
As a basis for this dis-
board will have the sug
President Wilson, that cc
should be given the adva
cost of living and the relal
road employes pay to the
lines of industry.
Mr. Hines saw the presi
but said it was only for I
of showing him what pro
been made. There were r
Mr. Hines would deliver a
the conference from the '
but there was no confirma

versity hall on March 29 was made
last night by Mr. Ray K. Immel of the
Oratory department. They are as fol-
lows: -Seniors, ,Earl Dunn- and Ida
Gratton; juniors, Jack Goskin and C.
T. McKinney; sophomore, P. H. Scott
One of these five students will be
selected at the final contest to comi-
pete in the northern Oratorical lea-
gue contest to be held the first Friday
in May at Madison, Wis. "The ora-
tions this year are fully as good if
not better than those of previous
years," said Mr. Immel in regard to the
contest.

TWO PROFESSORS TO A
ARCHITECTS' SMOKE]
Two talks by University

firm in the wholesale grocery busi- 1 will feature, the ar(

r'

Swimmers to Be Photographed Today
The swimming team pictures for
the Michiganensian will be taken at
3:30 o'clock this afternoon at the Y..
M. C. A. All men, including tryouts,
are requested to be on hand with the:'
suits. The picture will be used if the
candidate makes the team.

ness.
Rumor of Railroad Wreck Unfounded
Rumors to the effect that a wreck
had occurred on the Michigan Central
railroad near Ann Arbor proved un-
founded last night when the ticket
agent at the Michigan Central station
stated that only a sick man had been
taken from a train to the Homoeo-
pathic hospital.

8 o'clock tonight in the
H. R. Cross of the fine
ment will speak on "The T
ern Architecture," while
Wood of the sociology de:
chosen for his subject, "T
ical Aspect of the Hou
lem." Miss Jeanette Kruz
some interpretative danc
Fischer's orchestra will f

I

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