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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 04, 1920 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-04

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[HE MICHIGAN VA

b

sj.. .

MAJESTIC
THURS.-FRI.-SAT

0

)RPHEUM THEATRE
2700 3-30 7:00. 9.30 10-On 1

T ,stage
THE WHITNEY

.1

Anita Stewart
In

I

"IN OLD KENTUCKY"

WUERTH THEATRE
Wed-Thurs-3-4-A. J:.Blackton produc-
tion "Dawn" with a kinogram weekly
and comedy, "Trial by Jury."
Fri-Sat-S-6-William Farnum in "Heart
Strings" also comedy, "Over the Ocean
Wave" and news.
Sun-Mon-7-8-William Russell in "Six
Feet Four" with a "Snub" Pollard com-
edy and colored review.
Tues-Wed-9-30-Shirley Mason in "The
Elephant Man" with aHall Room Boys'
comedy, " Chicken Hlunter" anid'kino-
gram weekly.
Thurs-Fri-11-12-All star cast in a com-
edy-drama, "The Gay Old Dog" also a
two-reel comedy, "Good Little Brownie."

Thurs-Fri-4-5--Montagu Love in "The
Steel King" with a news and comedy.
Sat-----All star, cast in "Oh 'Boy" (re--
turn date) also a screen magazine and
comedy.,1
Sun-Mon-(Watch for this picture?).
Tues-Wed-7-8--Frank in "The Brute
Breaker" also showing Craig Kennedy
stories.
COMING
Nazimova in "Eye for Eye."
Olive Thomas in "Footlights and
Shadows."
Eugene O'Brien in he Broken Melody."
HUBE "BETTY BE GOOD"
0E1'BB1with,
V iETROI aheena
I Garrick Detroit
Louis Mann in "FRIENDLY ENEMIES"

"Civilian Clothes," coming next
Thursday to the Whitney, is based on
the old controversy of whether cloth-
es make the man.

closing that she is neither the middle
aged woman he thinks he has married
nor the tempermental Greenwich vil-
lage genius that had fascinated him
but a young girl who cleverly accom-
plished her purpose and then couldn't
resist playing a few pranks on her
life partner.
LIBRARY EXHIBITS RARE
ENGRAVEDBIRD BOOKS

I

The Screen

THE MAJESTIC

Life Of Alice Freeman Palmer,
' 76, One Of Help and 1Friendsh

i - r
1 . .

FLOWERS

FLOWERING PLANTS

Cousins & Hall
Members Florists Telegraph Delivery
Phone 115 1002 S. Univ
WHITNEY THEATRE
One Night -Thurs. Mar.'11
The big New York and Chicago success coming to Ann
Arbor direct from a 3 months run in Chicago.
OL1VER 1'M OROSC
- 1VILL AM
COURT NAY
ID ~r-.oD.TED BY A TYPICAL
OIRLO MORO "'C"O CAIS'T S
IN HE ,MARTEYT COMEDY OF THE -YEAR.\
.-...'TOM4PJON UC1H ANAN
The company de luxe assisting Mr. Courtenav includes:
Dorothy Dickinson, Frances Underwood, Isabel Irving,
William klolden, JK. Murray, LloydNeal, Ray Waiburn
and other arfists who are from the New York theatres.
SEAT SALE OPENS. MAIL ORDERS NOW. 75c to $2

Excitement and action are present
from beginning to end in Anita Stern-
art's "In Old Kentucky," scheduled
to appear today and Friday and Sat-
urday at the Majestic. Feudal quar-
rels, struggles for rich mountain
lands, and love jealousies are the pot-
ential forces at work in the lives of
the principal characters, the chief of
whom is a daring young girl of the
Kentucky mountains and her suitor
from the outside world.
Miss Stewart is cast as the moun-
tain heroine who is, at the opening
of the story, almost engaged to a
young mountaineer with whom she
has common feudal interests, as the
relatives of both have fought on the
same sine of a private dispute. Life
takes on a new aspect when she meets
a young man from New York who is
on a trip through Kentucky. The
stranger is also attracted to her and
the mountain friend of her child-
hood preceives that he is in danger
of losing his prize.
In a fit of jealousy the young moun-
taineer sets a trap to kill his rival
but repents. After lie has left others
hostile, the New York man plots to
employ the device for the same end-
but this is only the beginning of the
series of thrilling episodes that form
the story.
THE ARCADE
In "She Loves and Lies," to be re-
peated for the last times today at the
Arcade, Norma Talmadge temporar-
ily forsakes the serious and emotion-
al parts in which she has previously,
appeared to such good advantage, to
take up comedy in its lighter vein.
Her vehicle for this maiden effort'
is unique for its originality, the her-
oine being at the same time the wife
and "the other woman," and even as
the wife she is not whet the hus-
band thinks she is. Unconsiously her
husband"is made the dupe of first
one trick and then another until he is
completely confused and mystified to
the entertainment of all witnesses.
Finally she puts him at ease by dis-

SET OF AUDUBON'S
WORKS IS IN-
CLUIDED

Valuable books containing engrav-
ings of birds have just been placed on
exhibit in the main corridor of the
Library.
The books represent works of John
James Audubon, Alexander Wilson,
Charles Bonaparte, John Gould and,
R. Bowider Sharpe.
Four Volumes Comprise Set
Audubon's set consists of four vol-
umes called "Birds of North Ameri-
ca. It was published in London
from 1827 to 1838 and was acquired
by the University in 1839.
There are supposed to be 175 sets
of this work in existence, 80 of which
are in the United States. A set in
good condition was offered in 1913 for
over $4,000.
Another work exhibited is "The
American Ornithology," by Alexander
Wilson. It is in four volumes and was
printed in Edinburgh in 1823. Wilson
was a Scottish weaver, peddler and
school teacher who was forced to come
to America in 1794 because he had
written satires that were too pointed
on the master weavers of Paisley.
Bonaparte's Nephew a Writer
Charles Bonaparte, prince of Car-s
nino and Misignano, also the nephew
of Bonaparte the first, lived in Phil-
adelphia from 1822 to-1828. He is the
author of "The Natural History of
Birds Inhabiting the United States."
The rest of the books in the exhibit
are the "Birds of New Guinea and the
Adjacent Papuan Islands," by John
Gould, and the "Birds of Paradise"
and "Bower Birds" by R. B. Sharpe.
These two collections were donated to
the University by the Hon. A. M. Todd
of Kalamazoo in 1916.
Mead Is Interne at Homoeop. hospital
At the Homoeopathic hospital P.
Mead is the only new interne to take
up work this semester.
Patronize the Daily Advertisers.

ANCIENTI

(By Winefred Biethan)
Alice Freeman Palmer, '76, was
probably Michigan's most beloved
alumnae. Her husband wrote of her,
in "The Life of Alice Freeman Palm-
er," "Her friends were numbered by;
the ten thousands."
Born in 1855 on a farm in Coles-
ville, New York, she lived her earliest
years an industrious, helpful; life.
She was burdened in the University
with both scholastic and financial dif-
ficulties, for her preparation at Wind-,
sor Academy, Windsor, New York,
was so inadequate that she entered
on condition. To gain even partial
financial aid from her parents she
promised never to marry until sheF
herself had put her brother through
college and given her sisters what-
ever education they desired.
Pays Debt to Parents
She paid this debt during five years
of underpaid, overworked, teaching,
and the years following when she was
head of the history department of
Wellesley and president there.
Her class, the third after women
were admitted here, was composed of
11 women and 64 men. President
Angell said, "One of her most strik-
ing characteristics in college was her
warm and demonstrative sympathy
with her circle of friends. She could
not but be, to a certain degree, a
leader." She worked in the debating
club and other campus activities, was
connected with the Presbyterian
church, and taught the roughest class
in a mission school Sunday afternoon,
making money at tutoring on week
days.
Human, After All
Her letters throw considerable light
on her life here. Present students
may take courage, for even she said,
"I had such an abominable habit of
wasting time." A different view arises
when she writes of the theater, "It
pays to go once, but it wouldn't do
for a University girl, with her hands
and head more than full, to indulge in
such 'exciting pleasures often."
"Ann Arbor has been in uncontroll-
able excitement this week," she wrote
another time. "Thirty boys have been
suspended and one expelled. The sen-
ior and junior classes are aroused
and the whole body of studentsibolted
chapel two mornings last week. At a
great meeting a petition was sent to
the faculty signed by 65 sophomores
and 70 freshmen asking to be sent
off, too, as they were equally guilty.
If there Is general suspension, the two
classes will go in a body to Cornell."
"Oracle" Explains Excitement
The explanation of this excitement
is in "The Oracle" of 1874. The morn-
ing after a sophomore-freshman fight
two boys of the winning class took a
banner to chapel. Outside the door
more than 50 others joined to make a
triumphal entry, when a member of
the faculty demanded the flag. The
boy who had it was suspended for
planning to disturb chapel, but such
indignation resulted as Mrs. Palmer
described.
To her sister, Lucy, she wrote, "Oh
L! (meaning Lucy). Don't you wish
we could stop this dreadful liquor
selling!"
She became h ead of the history de-
partment at Wellesley college in 1879,
and president in 1882, at the age of
27. In that sam( year, though her
hesis was neve finished, Michigan
conferred upon her the degree of

that "God could take a joke," and"it
was commonly believed that Miss
Freeman's Bible was not the ordin-
ary Bible, for out of- it came extraor-
dinary chapters, extraordinarily fitt-
ed to occasions that arose." She or-
ganized a Christian association that
later became a non-demoninational
church.
Marries George Palmer
She married George Herbert Palm-
er of Cambridge, in 1887. She made
friends of everyone she met, and en-
tertained all in her home. She work
ed with the Collegiate Alumnae asso-
iation, was on the executive commit-
tee of Wellesley, and attended their
mneetings, and was for nine yeas
president of the Women's Educational
association of Boston.
"Europe we took as our play-
ground," wrote Mr. Palmer. They
spent 1888, 1895, and 1902, not sight
seeing, but enjoying Europe and its
people. They carried with them every
where "tablecloth, clock, hearth rug,
and many books to make even hotel
rooms look homelike." Into a holiday
no schoolgirl of 12 ever carried a
lighter heart.
1902 Marks Her Death
Mrs. Palmer's death came in 1902.
Her prayer was, "God help me to give
what he gave-myself, and make that
self worth something to somebody;
teach me to love all as He has loved
for the sake of the infinite possibili-
ties locked up in every human soul."
Lovell Heralds
Advent OfSpring
IT IS THE FIRST DAY OF SPRING
(By Dr. "Thomas orOIll)
It is the first day of spring,
To gladden hearts again;
For the golden sun is shining
Upon the meadows and the plains,
The hillsides and the woodlands
No longer will remain
All covered with the beautiful snow,
That swells and warms the grain.
We welcome gladly springtime
Now the winter is gone;
For no sooner the sun its shines
The 'woodlands will be filled with
song,
For these little songster will be
there,
With the frog found hopping along,
That's been sleeping in the pools
Made, to get out by the sun.
Springtime is for nest building
On those twigs of trees,
Where little eggs will be laid in
With these birds to warm and feed
For no -sooner these eggs will be
hatched
These little featherless will be
Until they are strong enough
To fly through space to see.
Summer with flowers to appear
Upon the earth again,
For they're will be those refreshing
showers
-To water themt again.
As we go from sringtime to summer
To be thus explained,
For spring and summer never fails to
come
For the old earth still remains.
HOSPITALS GET 17 INTEbNES
FROM SENIOR MEDIC CLASS
Seventeen new intern'es have been
appointed this semester at the Uni-
versity hospital and nine more are ex-
pected to be appointed by the end of
the week. Those already appointed
are all, members of the class of '20M

in this university.
The appointees in surgery are R.
M. Cleary, G. C. Adie, H. M. Nelson, J.
Manting, H. L. Miller, C. N. Weller,
and F. E. Curtis; in medicine, J. Pal-
ma, D. J. Barnes, L. J. Foster, and H.
G. Waller; in otology W. G. Stinson;
In ophthalmology R. E. Boice and R.
L. Jinch; in roentgenology E. F. Mer-
rill, and in dermatology A. Kurchner
and H. L. Keim.

- Ir

Tomdaioy,

To- morrow,
Saturday.

Ph.D. in history
Her Presidency Brings Fame
During Alice Freeman's presidency,
Wellesley became famed everywhere,
largely through her own public lec-
tures at other colleges. The faculty
was improved through her choosing
estimable members, and the Academic
council of faculty members was or-
iginated, saholarship was raised,
equipment added, and a traditional
personality was established, Alice
Freeman's own.
"Isn't it fun to be president?" she
once exclaimed, and she encouraged
that enthusiasm to do, and freedom of
expression in each individual student.
She was' deeply religious, but thought
Branch Nickels Arcade

IU~ORM F IT
TALBOT- 2's in.
TYRONE- 2Yin.
RROW
form COLLARS
are curve cut to ft the.
shoutders perfecty
Ctuet, feabody &Co:Incmkrs

"
Ladies' Party

i

Gowns a Specialty

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