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March 04, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-04

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N

'EATHER
AND SNOW

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND \IGUT WIRE
SERVICE

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TODAY

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VOL. XXX. No. 108. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1920. PRICE THREE ClI

CURATIV ETHODS
ALON TAU6T BY
MEDICAL SCHOOLS
-DEAN VAUGHAN
DECLARES DOCTORS UNABLE TO
COPE WITH MANY
QUESTIONS
PREVENTITIVE SDE 0 F
EDUCATION NEGLECTED
Says Sanitary Engineer Better Fitted
to Do Publie Health Work
Than -Phratlan
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press);
Elizabeth, N. J., March 3.-Three
trainmen, were killedi and a dozen
passe gers were injured today when
the 1hampton Express of the Central
railroad of lNew Jersey crashed into
a work train at Elizabethport and the
engine blew up.
Debris was hurled high into the air
as the trains came together and many
of the injured were strukk by wreck.
age as they stood on the platlorm at
the station, then great clouds of steam
shot up as the boilers burst. Pnie
ensued and a late report 'gi that a
dozen had been kMiie a eores in-
jured.
- eago, March 3. - "The sanitary
engineer is better fitted in the study
of disease prevepitives than are our
graduates of medical colleges," Dr. V.
C. Vaughan, dean pf Medicine in the
VQiversity of 1Wicigan, declared today
before the Congres on medical ques-
iealthi Worlk 14 t ught
"9fraduates j eu~' medical -sehools
are net fitted to do public health
wiork," he said. "The science'of pre.-
ventitive medicine is not taught in
our universities. The whole trend of
the teaching is -toward curative meth-
ods.
Advocates Hygiene Courses
"A committee of which I was a
member examined a number of med-
ical graduates, and although they were
able to pass strict tests in surgery on
curative courses, they were unable to
cope with preve ttve u tionVi'-' era
yaqa 4 ~~ gire puble by-
MICHIGAN GRAD,
SYRACUSE HEAD
Shirley Dare Babbitt, Michigan
gradpiate, is, now head of the English
depertment of Applied Science at,
Syracuse university. Professor Bab-
* bitt received two degrees here, A. .
In '15 and A. M. in '16. His present
home Is in Houghton, N. Y.
He entered war service Feb. 27,
4,31 191, taking pWs in all operations of
the 77th division. His division was
the first one of the natTonal army to
reach France and was in\a11n ot con-
tinuous ac il l It e Itill the
mistc. 'gs e lgnd.
The 77th division was the only one
ibat cQmpletely travrsed the Argonne
forest withiout ref. Itil the arm-
ati'c} yb. migqd civisio, alone
rt tlh Q thev of (ept. 26.
IIE$TS FOR EOPJ4OOE

pye ty-twq tickts for he sopho-
more Prom remain from the sale
Which tools place Tuesday night in the
tUn op, ccording to Douglas Dow,
'22:p chgirmn pf the oph Prom
cqmInittep. As early as 6 o'clock,
sgphomor s filled thq lobby of the Un-
for the tickets sale that com-
., ppced at 7:30 Q'eipCt:
Te22 tic1es $4gt Ore left may be
soegre4 y sophpmores only from
David Bters, 22, 1315 Hill or at 1460.
The price il $5 which includes the
war tax.
A Two hnstructore I4 IF9#Ch
Twq new instrictors have been se-
oured for the French department.
They are Edward Mathieu and Gustave
L. Michanq.
Mr.,Mathieu secpre4 is A. B. de-
grqp at 1Tarvirq in 1910, an4 his A.
M. degree from Washington university
in 1913. He has taught in high schools
in^Springfield, Mass., in New York

SENIOR LITS ELECT "PRODIGIES"
FROM AMONG MEMBERS OF

CLASS

POSTER CONTEST
WON BY BACHMAN

F

I,

Campus Problems of Long Duration
at Last Answered by Sages
Celebrities of the class of&'20, who
have spent four years of college life
fighting for first place among the "in-
fant prodigies of the class, were
selected at the senior lit meeting by
popular vote yesterday.
The final decision of the class on
campus problems that have baffled
faculty and students alike, ever since
the founding of the University, were
declared for the first time for the
help of more unsophisticated under-
classmen witi the full sanction of
the departing class.
Ee. 1 Deelared Beneflcial
Professor Taylor's Economica 1 was.
declared to be the most beneficial
course whether you passed it or not.
Creative listening, as usual, took an
easy first place as the biggest snap,
while Fine Arts received the largest
number. of votes as the most enjoy-
able course.
Due to the large number of nearly
GIRLS'1 GLEE CLUB
TO BOW TONIGHT
School of Music Organization to Offer
Concert; Entertainment of
varied SWye
"MIDNIOHT DAUGHTERS" TO
APPEAR IN POPULAR SONGS
Under the direction of Miss Maude
C. Kleyn, the Gi ls' Glee club of the
University School of Music will make
its public debut at 8 o'clock tonight
in Pattengill auditorium of the local
high school.
Of the total membership of 24, all
are taking work in the School of Mu-
sic. The club will be assisted by
Miss Ethelyn Metz, of Holland, Mich.,
a reader from the College School of
Expression.
18 Numbers on Program
Chorus singing, quartet numbers.
and solo work will go to make up the
program, which includes, in all, 18 se-
lections. Two of these wiUb l pr-
sented in cgstpe. .
Opening with a group of Univer-
sity songs given by the entire organ-
ization, three other ensemble num-
bers will be given during the evening.'
In one of these, "The Snow," Dorothy
Haymaker, Neva Nelson, '21, Margaret
Foote, '21, and Sophia Wolczynski,
'22, violinists will take part. A group
of songs, "Negro Spiritual," "Cossack
Lullaby," and "Spinning Song" will
also be sung.1
Flora Kelley, Helen Marshall, Mabel
DeVine anud Catherine Coburn com-
pose the Midnight Daughters quar-
tet, which will appear in "Populap
Melodies." Another quartet, to give
"An Episode' and "The Snow Storm"
is made up of. Helen 14arshall, Gene-
vieve Alger, Marcia Coburn, and Dor-
1s Howe,
Readings t, Be iren
Among the. seleptiqns to. be, re4
Miss Metz are "Te Absen Guest,'
"Mon Pierre", and "The Circus at Ole
St. Anne's." Neva Nelson, '21, and,
Dorothy Haymaker will render violin
solos. The program will be clppe a
with "Springtime,' sung by the tire,1
club.
CLASSICAL CLUB TO HEA
PROF. J. H. DRAKE T014J
Initiation of. 14w li eituxe and Party
Discussion to Follow Speak.
er's Address

Prof. Joseph. H. Draka of m tLaw
school, will be the spegker, at a -meet-

i

GRADUATION NOTICE

Orders for senior commence-
ment announcements and invi-
tations will be taken, when ac-1
companied by money, from 1 to
5 o'clock today and tomorrow,
March 4 and 5, in the main cor-
ridor of University hall. The
announcements are priced at 15
cents and the invitations at 75
cents.
DAVID NASH,
Chairman Invitation Committee.
equal claims, considerable difficulty
was encountered in selecting the
"prodigies," who are to hold their
places for all time. Ruth "Boots"
Abbott received a clear title as the
most popular girl. Carl Johnson is
her running mate as the most popular
man with equal support from both
sexes. Gretchen Jones was finally
elected the prettiest girl and Bill Hn-
shaw the handsomest man.
Margueite Chapin Best Student
Marguerite Chapin, With Roberta
Deam a close second, was voted the
best 'student of either sex. Unex-
pectedly, "Bill" Fortune was honored
as the, biggest bluffer of either sex.
Thelma James seemed to have little
competition as the 'hardest grind.
The chances for a future president
look good with "Bill" Hinshaw and
"Dave" Nash evenly tied as the
shrewdest politicans in the class. El-
sie Erley and Catherine Grow tied
for the titleNf the jolliest girl Reed
Bachman, with the stipulation that he
was the most consistent if not the
worst, took first place as the worst
fusser. "Dave" Nash again placed in
the election as the sportiest guy.
Anne Hutehins To Be First Wed
The class decided Anne Hutchins
will be the first girl to be married and
"Herb." Slusser was the best bet as
the first man. As a last decision it
was decided "Dave" Landis had done
the most of the little knocking of the
class.
It was found that the class has a*
substantial balance of $2,086.46, ac-
cording to J. P. Hart, the treasurer...
It was requested by Ruth Jennings1
that all the girls order their caps and
gowns with Mack and company before
March 13. David Nash desired all the
orders for invitations and announce-
ments to be turned in with the money
at the place announced.I
President Hinshaw read a .letterf
from Fannie Bigg, secretary of the
class of '10, in which she suggested
Commencement week be livened up
for the old graduates with a play
by the class of '20. The Blass de-
cided to give a vaudeville with the
help of the other senior classes in
Hill auditorium or the Union.'
FILIPINO CONEIDENILE
MANIN R00AG0 J~IL
Vincent Tom Salvaterra, arreste&E
in Chicago on the charge of securing
money under false pretenses in Ann,
Arbor, Chicago, and Kenosha, Wis.,l
when a;&aigned in justice court Tue
day, waived examination an was1
bound over to the Washelkaw eircuitf
court for trial in Maeh. The bond,
was fixed at ,WOO and Savaterra is,
now A the county jail waiting for
money from his mother, who live11. ,a
the Philippine Islands,
Salvaterra drew seven . checks
against the Anu Arbor Savings bank,
in this and several checks against
hanI in Chicago and Kenosha, Wis.
Salvaterra, a native of the Phi;h -
pine Islands is well apear %& and

Only Six Drawings Submitted; This
Year Marks Winner's Fourth
Success
SEAGEARS AND WIENER GET
SECOND AND THIRD PLACES
Reed Bachman, '20, for the fourth
consecutive time submitted the poster
which yesterday was chosen by the
committee to be used on the program,
music score, and advertising for the
1920 Union opera, "George Did It."
Honorable mention was accorded
by the committee to Clayton B. Sea-
gears, '23, who won second p'lace, and
to S. G. Wiener, '20A, who took third.
In all, six drawings were submitted,
two of them being by Seagears.
Bachman's drawing, which is done
in seven rich colors, blue, orange, yel-
low, pink, black, and two shades of
green, is in keeping with the theme of
the play, showing the two periods,
1859 and the modern time. Two char-
acters, dressed in costumes of the
Civil war period, are shown pulling
back the ends of a dark colored cur-
tain, behind which a modern costume
ball is being conducted.
At the top of the poster in the left
hand corner is shown in large letters
"George Did It," beneath which ap-
pears in red "14th Michigan Union
opera."
The committee which judged the
posters is composed ofProf. L. H.
Boynton, Prof. Emil Larch, and W.
B. Shaw, alumni secretary.
R ,T4 C' MENTIJET!
S CDET PAY AT'CAMPS

TRANSPORTAT4ON RATES
RATIONS EN ROUTE TO

AND

BE GIVEN
"Students enrolled in the R. 0. T.
C. and authorized to attend the sum-:
mer camps will be transported to and
from the camp and subsisted while
traveling," Captain Arthur said further
Wednesday concerning the, R. O. T.
d. summer camps. "This, of course,
applies only in the United States.
Those detained by unavoidable caus-
es from reporting at the opening of
the camps will be given 10 days from
such date in which to report, but not
more than 10 days.
Will Not Take Uniforms
"The men will take no uniforms
with them but will be issued complete
regulation uniforms of outer clothing
at the camp. While at the camp they
will be furnished with all necessary
equipment, including bedding, eating
utensils, sleeping quarters, medical
treatment, etc.
'In the Army re-organization bill
prepared by Senator Wadsworth pay
for students attending the advanced
camp i& provided at the rate of pay
for cadets at the U. S. Military Acad-
emy. In the bill prepared in the
house of representatives pay is pro-
vided for both camps at the rate of
Day for a private in the army. Ex-
isting regulations do not provide for
pay for attending these camps. Ration
allowance, however, will be that pro-
vided for cadets at the U. S. Military
Academy, which is somewhat great-
er than that at the normal army gar-
rison.
Camp Period Is Six Weeks,
Duration of the camp period is six
weeks, or as in the case of the Coast
Artillery camp, it covers a training
period of 196 hours.
Changes In Classes
Mr. Steffen's course in Political sci-
ence 12 will meet at 7 o'clock ,Thus-
day nights, in room 304 Economics
building.
A supplementary examination in
Zoology 1 will be given Saturday,.
March 6, at 2 o'clock, for those who
were absent from the examination at
the regular time.
Former Daily Editor Visits Campus
H. C. L. Jackson, '18, of the Detroit
News, and managing editor of the
Michigan Daily in 1917, .was in Ann
Arbor Tuesday.

ADDRSES UNREPORTED
Union Wishes to Be Informed of Stu-
dent Residence Changes
"All men who have changed ad-
dresses since the beginning of the first
semester should so inform the record-
ing committee of the Union," was the
statement Wednesday of George Hur-
ley, '18L, general secretary of the
Union.-
"At least 200 men must have chang-
ed their residence since the first of
the year, but up to the present only
40 or 50 have sent this information in
to the Union so that the records may
be corrected. It is only necessary for
a man to take a plain postal card, ad-
dress It to the assistant recording
secretary at the Union and on the
back of the card indicate what his
present address and telephone number
are, together with his full name and
year.
"As the recording committee will
complete its work by the end of this
week it is urgent that notice of all
changes be in its hands by that time."
DETROIT TEAC HERS
FORM FEDERATION
Organization Is Second of Kind in That
City; Open to Women; First
Only for Men
NO OPPOSITION IS GIVEN
BY BOARD OF EDUCATION
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, March 3. - A second local
of the American Federation of Teach-
ers, which is affiliated with the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor, was organ-
ized by public school teachers here
tonight. The chapter is 'open to wom-
en teachers of the high schools and
grades, the first local being composed
of men.
The Board of Education has offer-
ed no opposition to the movement al-
though numbers have stated that, it
would not materially aid the instruct-
ors in their demands for increased
salaries.
Miss Ratcheal McKinney, president
of the Detroit Teachers' association,
declared not more than 200 of the
4,000 teachers had joined the union.
FRENCH PLAY TRY-
OUTS ARE TONIGHT
Final tryouts for places in the cast
of "L' Ami Fritz" will be held at 7:30
o'clock tonight in room 202 of South
Wing. The following people are re-
quested to report at that time: Ede-
laine Roden, '22, Harriet C. Gustin,
'22, Margaret E. Beckett, '22, Bere-
nice M. Warsau, '22, David - A. Watts,
'21, A. J. Himmelhoch, '20, Joseph
Freedman, '21, Alan H. Reekie, '22,
Renaud Sherwood, '22, H. Ranft, '21,
Fay Kendrick, '23, and William G.
Sharp, '23.
The director would be glad to have
any who have not yet tried out, come
tonight. Men are especially needed.
There are several small parts that are
still open and no parts have yet been
definitely assigned. The woman who
has the leading feminine role should
have a good singing voice.
ALUMNI PLAN TO COMPLETE
DARTMOUTH STADIUM IN 1924

In an exchange in the issue for
Feb. 18 a statement about the stadi-
um at Dartmouth was made which
was not correct. The new stadium
which will be completed under favor-
able conditions, in 1924, is to be con-
tributed by the undergraduatgs: and
friends of the college as well as the
alumni and will replace the present
plant, Alumni Oval.
PROF. FRIDAY ADDRESSES
ATHENA LITERARY SOCIETY
More than 20-guests attended Athena
Literary society meeting Tuesday
night when Prof. David Friday spoke
on "Presidential Candidates." He
summed up what in his mind is the
political situation, disclaiming au-
thority, however, as this is not his
field of research.
Athena will have meetings open to
the public once every month.

TO ASK REGENTSt
FOR SANCTION ON
POLITICAL TALKS
STUDENT COUNCIL TO REQUEST
HILL AUDITORIUM BAN
BE LIFTED
PLAN TO FOSTER MOCK
CAMPAIGN CONVENTION
Committee Reports Dates Set For
Campus Events, Including
Blanket Presentation
Requesting that political sIfeeches
be sanctioned in Hill auditorium, a
petition will be presented to the
Board of Regents at its next meet-
ing, was the decision of the Student
council at its meeting last night.
While the council will merely request
that such sanction be granted, it will
also suggest that a faculty commit-
tee be appointed to pass on the ad-
visability of allowing speakers the
use of the building, in each individual
case.
Convention Plans Outlined
In order to stimulate student in-
terest in the coming presidential elec-
tion it was decided to promote a mock
convention at Michigan. The plan as
outlined calls for the organization of
candidates' clubs, for a primary elec-
tion, and finally for the holding of
both a Republican .'and a Democratic
convention.
The committee on Spring events
reported that the following dates have
been set: Spring games, Friday and
Saturday, May 14 and 15; swing-out,
Thursday, May 20; Cap night, Friday,
May 21; and Blanket presentation,
Saturday, May 22. The last date was
chosen with special reference to the
interscholastic meet which will be
held on that day. The council be-
lieves that these ceremonies will serve
to interest visiting high school sen-
iors in Michigan. A committee con-
sisting of Carl T. Hogan, '20E, as
chairman, Fred W. Petty, '21, William
W. Hinshaw, '20, and Henry T..Eager,
'20L, was .appointed to arrange for
appropriate ceremonies.
Calendar To Be Published
In the future the council intends to
publish a calendar of student events
for the college year. The committee
appointed to compile this calendar for
the year 1926-21 consists of Curtis E.
Bottum, '20E, Henry Whiting, '21,
Joseph A. Kervin, '20M, Milner S.
Ballard, '20H and Grayson W. Gill,
'20A.
The question of the advisability of
incorporating class dues into the reg-
ular tuition fee was discussed and it
was decided to draw up a petition to
the Board of Regents requesting that
this be done. Such a petition will be
presented at an early meeting of the
Board.
Officers of the different senior class-
es wil be requested to file reports of
their standing committee] with the
Student council in order that future
senior class officers may use them for
reference.
Favors Traditions' Revival
The council expressed itself as be-'
ing in favor of a revival of any of
Michigan's traditions, and of their en-
forcement.
G. D. Anderson, '22L, was elected
council auditor.
ST. PATRICK'S PARTY TO BE
GIVEN AT MARTHA COOK DOR

All students, men ine uded, are in-
vited to a benefit St. Patrick's Day
card party to be given at 2 o'clock
March 13 at Martha Cook dormitory
to raise money for the Alumni Res-
idence and Rose Sidgwick fellowship
funds. Tea will be served.
Commerce Club Holds Meeting
A business session of the Commerce
club was held at 7:30, o'clock last
night in room 304 of the Union. The
club's next meeting will be called at
7:30 o'clock next Wednesday evening
on the third floor of the Union.
I'

ing of the Classical club torbe held seems to be educated. IHeelaims to
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in room A, have come to the Umited States in
Alumni Memorial hall. He will take 1917 and to have entered at that time
as his subject "Classical Study and the Univeray of California, where he
Professional Scholarship."I spectlftiIn music and received are
W. Keith Chidester, '24, presI4ent r'A.B. degree.
of the club, announces that a new A He came to AnneA.ber about a
feature will be initiated, requiring the 1month ao With the idea of entering
presence of all members. Important the Law school but experienced dif-
business will be taken up, and mat- ficulty in doing this. Salvaterra seems
ters pertaining to the annual party confident that he will receive aid from
for the organization discussed dag his mother o
the evening. .
Czechs Close German University Mary F te Ord Granted Mom
Prague, Czecho-Slovakia, March S. Mary Pickford, motion picture star,
-The government has closed the Ger- was granted a divorce from Owen
'nan university here and it will be- Moore on the grounds of desertion
come a Sech college. March 1 at Minden, Neb.

CHIMES TRYOUTS

'

Sophomores wishing to try out
for the Chimes business staff
may apply at the Chimes office
in. the Press building between
1 and 2 o'clock every day except

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