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March 03, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-03

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L'1wIU V
PF
D)AY AND:'
SEI

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 1926.

PRICE T

.._... .. , _ _........ .. ... r. - -
.R ..
,:

-OCIETY TO ARGUE
IRISH QUESTION
Resolved:That Ireland should be
ranted her independence, is the issue
to be 4lscussed at a meeting of the
Alpha Nu Debating society at 7:30
o'clock Friday evening, in room 402
University hall.
On March 19 the society will re-
OR solve itself into a nominating conven-
tion. The speeches at that time will
be given in behalf of Republican pres-,
idential nominees. In a session to be
S held soon afterward, opportunity will
vT be given to. speak in behalf of Demo-
.cratic nbhainees. All men wishing to
speak in the meeting March 19 are
asked to.see some tnember of the pro-
gram committee this, week.

Important Research Work Is
Held Up 'By Lack Of Assistants

"Because of the inability to pro-
cure assistants . to conduct experi-
ments in this department, several im-
portant tests are being delayed," re-
cently declared Prof. F. N. Menefee
of the engineering mechanics depart-
inent.
Experiments are conducted in the
testing materials laboratory on build-
ing materials such as cement, con-
crete, iron and steel. Also the ef-
fects of heat treatment and temper-
ing are tested and a new Brenell test-
ing machine for the purpose of re-
cording relative resistance to press-
ure of materials has recently been pro-

cured from the + government salvage
department in Detroit.
One of the tests which Professor
Menefee is desirous of making iswon
various types of concrete inserts.
These inserts are for the purpose of
hanging shafting or general piping
work from the ceiling. A number of
firms have sent their models to the
testing laborat'ory and are closely
watching for thenresults. According
to Professor Menefee this would be
the first experiment of its kind to be
conducted in this country and would
be of considerable importance in con-
struction work. Any junior or senior
engineers who may be interested in
this work are requested -to consult
with Professor Menefee,,

o LITS TO SELECT
CELEBRITIES OF CLASS
EFITS OF FOUR YEARS OF
TUDY TO BE DETERMINED
TODAY

i

toe !

iclusions

Personal

reached by
s after four
ttendance at
bared to the
ilds elections
nior lits" at
in room 205

of She se
afternoon

The Tick
beneficial,

course, the big-
njoyable course,
the most pop-
meet man, the
i open to both
luff er, the big-
ed as to sex),
an, the jolliest

it is be- girl, the greatest fusser, first man to
the other be married, fig it girl to be married,
and the worst knocker will all re-
said thatceive more or less public recognition,
1 of pre- To R ~ear 1epoirts
to Direc- Aside from the main attraction,
intrusted the class will hear reports from the
p of gov- treasurer, the pipe and cane, the in-
sident in vitation, and ,the cap and gown com-
ack the -mittees. The invitation committee
will start its campaign for orders
Thursday and Friday'6f this week.
PresidentWilliam W. Hins aw partic-
s and the ulavly requests all comml1 tee chair-
otify the n to be present.
>antatives
med that
the first CLOCKS TO BE SET
ietermin- AHEAD MARCH 28
ocedures.
give the -
arded as University clocks will be set ahead
a strike. ane hour at 2 o'clock Sunday morn-
lug, March 28,, in accordance with the
,*[H general progfam of daylight saving
adopted by the city council Monday
evening, University officials announe-
e4 Tuesday.
The change back will be made at
the same hour on the last Sunda;
yn October. Ann Arbor will have the
formerly same time as Detroit and cities in the
4 o'clock East, with the exception of those
where he which also adopt the daylight saving
w years
A plan.

SENIOR BLAN.KETS
Blankets Bearing "M's" to Be Awarded
Athletes with Fitting.Ceremony;
Stars for Number of Years
AFFAIR WILL PROBABLY BE
HELD DURING LATE SPRING
The practice of awarding blankets'
to senior athletes, which was estab-
lished at. Michigan by the action of
the Board in Control of Athletics last
Saturday, although not exactly in the
form which it is planned to give them
here, is in vogue in many of the west-
ern colleges.
"Blanket Hop" at Indiana
At the University of Indiana a blan-
ket is given to each football letter
man and to each senior athlete. Al-
though they are not given at any set
time, the public presentation is made
at some occasion such as before a
large basketball game. The money
necessary for the purchase of these
blankets is raised by a subscription
dance which has come to be Inown as
-te Blanket Hop."
'Gold football watch fobs, football
caps, vests, and the regulation letter-
ed sweaters are given to the men win-,
ning their letters.
At the University of Purdue the
same custom of making the award of
the letter and sweater, or blanketbe-
fore a game is also carried out.
Northwestern's award to her seniot
athletes is in the form'of a gold serv-
ice medal. To win this a man must
have won at least three lettars in one
sport. The medal is cast in such a
way that It may be used for a watch
fob and costs about $45.
Iowa Considers Plan
Although the University of Iowa
does not at the present time give any-
thing except letters, it was stated in
a letter received by Carl T. Hogan, 20,
president of the Union, from the pres-
ident of the Iowa student council,
that there would probably be steps
taken in that direction by that school.
It has been suggested to the Stu-
dent Council of the University, which
is to have charge of the affair here,1
that it be held on the steps of the
new library. It is felt that this place
would not only give a large platform 1
on which to conduct the ceremony but
also that there is enough room here
to adpommodate all.

BAD CHECKS TICK
LOCAL MERCHANTS
.,Student" Gets Away with $196 and Is
Arrested in Chicago; Pleads
Innocence
WILLING TO DROP CHARGES
IF SETTLEMENT IS'MADE
r
Vincent Ton Salvaterra, who passed
several checks in Ann Arbor that were
returned by the bank, was arrested in
Chicago, and brought here for trial.
He was arraigned in justice court
Tuesday afternoon on the charge of
obtaining money under false pretens-
es and was bound over to the circuit
court.
Those who have chargesyagainst
him In Anne Arbor are, Myron E.
Slater, State street stationer, 480; J.
F. Wuier.th, Main street clothier, $45;
Charles W. Graham, State street ,ta-
tioner, $20; Haller and Fuller, State
street jewelers, $18. In addition to
these is $18 guaranteed to the Rev.
Fr. Burke, of the Students' chapel,
with which Salvaterra said he wish-
ed to send a telegram. and a bank
protest fok.$15.
Balance of 25 Cents
The checks for the above named
amounts were drawn against the Ann
Arbor Savings bank, in which Salva-
terra has an account of 25 cents. .His
total deficit in Ann Arbor, when all
complaints are in will total over
$200. .
The amount obtained by Salvaterra
from Slater was in the form of tavo
$40 checks.. Salvaterra represented
that he was a student in the Laiw de-
ph.rtment, but investigation failed to
show that he had registete& in the
Univ.ersity. One of the checks was
presented by Salvaterra, and the
other, made out to Henry Vick, was
presented by Vick. Since Vick en-
dorsed this check he is responsible
for the amount.
Expected Reimbursement
Mr. Slater said that 6e was willing
to drop the charges against' Salva-
terra, if he received his money. This
seems to be the stand taken by all
the merchants. Salvaterra said that
he issued these checks, knowing that
his account would not take care of
them, but that he expected money
that' would cover them before they
were protested. It seems that the
money has not yet arrived.
At the J. lk-Wuerth Co., Salvaterra
bought an overcoat, paying $5 on it,
and promisng to pay the rest later.
The Haller and Fuller account came
from apurcbAse of calling cerds val-
ued at $10 and of a locket valued at
$8. On this amount Salvaterra paid
$1, saying that he would return in
about an hour* and pay the rest.
The $18, obtained from the Rev. Fr.
Burke, was gotten upon representa-
tion of sending a cablegram. It has
been learned that the cablegram was
never sent.
A short time after Salvaterra left;
here, checks came into the Ann Arbor,
bank from Chicago in great numbers,
and many of them for large. amounts
The bank here refused to honor them
and returned them to Chicago.
Anxious to Make Good
Salvaterra seemed very anxious to
make good for the 'amounts, and has
sent for his baggage, in which he
claims are several articles which he
would be willing to turn over to the
authorities, in payment of his out-
standing accounts.

CAMPUS G. o. P.'S
FORM ORGANIZATION
Plans for an all-campus Republican
club to take the place of a Michigan
Chapter of the Gamma Cmcron Pi,
national organization of collegiate
Republicans, were announced last
night by th'e committee.
As a iesult of a conference of F.
H. Lauder, '22L, with several membere
of the Republican national commit-
tee, financial aid together with speak-
ers of national renown will be furn-
ished the local club by that body.
Support has likewise been promised
from the state and county committees.
The Hon. Chas. Warren of Detroit,
national committeeman from Michi-
gan, will be the first speaker. Theo-
dore Roosevelt, Jr., and others prom-
inent in the Republican party may be
secured later. No definite date has
been set as yet for Mr. Warren's ad-
dress. H. Fred Boron, '20, was chosen
as chairman of a temporary commit-
-tee of (he club.
ANNOTNCS OPENING DATE OF
R. 0. T. C. ENCAMPMENT
THIS SUMER
"The Cosat Artillery camp will start
on Thursday, June 17," stated Cap-
tan Arthur Tuesday. "That date and
the succeeding three days will be
used for organizing, for physical ex-
aminations and vaccinations.'
"The allotment of time is based on
a training day of seven hours and
five training days per week. The total
training time will be one hundred and
ninety-six hours.
Division of, ours M~ade
"Following is the division into
which this 196 hours will fall, as ten-
,tatively arranged by the war depart-
ment: Infantry drill will take up ,25
hours; physical training, including
swimming, 25 hours; artillery drill
and material, 62 1-2 hours; sign-
alling, 7 1-2 hours; small arms, prac-
tice /20 hours; military courtesy, 2
hours; first aid and hygiene. 2 hours;
guard duty, 5 hours; o'ientation, 11
hours; motor transportation, 15
hours; and artillery practice, 21 hours.
The work will be almost entirely
practical.,,
To Make Trips
"On Saturdays the time will be de-
voted to inspection, or the days will
be devoted to trips to nearby points
of interest," continued Captain Ar-
thur. "Athletic games and contestr
will usually 'be scheduled for Satur-
day afternoon."
FORMER DEAN OF
WOMEN IS HOIORED
Agnes E. Wells, who was acting
Dean of Women during Dean Jordan's
absence in the west, and social di-
rector of Newberry residence during
the school year of 1917-18, has been
elected secretary of the National As-
sociation of Deans of Women, which
held a convention at Cleveland, Ohio,
Feb. 23 and 24. At the present time
she is Dean of Women at the Univer-
sity of Indiana. Miss Wells was also
elected chairman of the Health fed-
eration. and chairman of the tempor-
ary organization of *the Deans, of In-
diana/universi ies
In the repo on "Securing the Co-

operation of Alumnae" which she de-
livered before the convention, Miss
Wells said, "The problem of interest-
ing desirable women in their alma
mater has been receiving attention
for years. Sorority women have-for
40 years looked forward to returning
to their University at frequent inter-
yals to see what kind of women have
Ieen chosen'to follow in their train.
Unorganized women have not return-
ed in so great numbers because they
have no place to stay. Many univer-
sities have met the situation through
dormitories and membership in alum.
nae associations. -The alumnae arej
aiding, in interesting prospective stu-
dents, especially high school seniors,
in the university of which they are
graduates."
Junior Lit Class Meeting Postponed
Because of the small attendance at
a meeting of the junior lits called at
3, o'clock Tuesday afternoon in Uni-
T- 11 : __ - 1 ^_ - t- ^ I.__

RECEIVE LARGER
THAN WHEN
, PASSED

IA

PR OVISION ON MONRC
DOCTRINE IS INCLUI:
Litkt Debate Attends- Senate Ac
Fight Expected To Go Into
Coming Campaign
Washington, March 2-Two mo
the Republican reservations to
peace treaty, one of them asse:
the bitterly debated Monroe doc
provision, were re-adopted in the
ate today without change- and
greater 'majorities than they comn
ed when originally presented
November.
The Monroe doctrine reservat
which senators had been told
scarcely less objectionable to P
dent Wilson than that relating t
ticle 10, got the support of 15 D
crats and won by a vote of 58 t
The other reservation acted or
serts the full jurisdiction of the
ited States over purely domestic <
tions and was adopted 56 to 25,
14 Democrats helping to make ip
majority. Little debate attended
senate action. The treaty is now
erally expected ,to go over into
presidential campaign.
BROMMEL WORING 01
UNION OPERA SCNI
Scenery for the Union o
"George Did It," which is being p
ed by Carl Brommel, said to be
only man in the. country capabl
reproducing the famous setting:
Joseph Urban, is being made in the
Union b'uilding.
During the past week Brun
with the aid of 'several assistants
been painting the scenery for the t
settings, which will keep him bus
to the eve of the show's produc
,The general public is prohibited .
watching him work.
Entirely new scenery will be
in the opera this year, the setting
the first act being a view of the
pus in 1859 with the town of Ann
bor in the distance. Draperies,
the characteristic Urban colors,
with specially made furniture
comprise the scenery for the i
lude, and the third act is a repro
tion. of a ball room in the hom
a California governor at Pasaden
E. Mortimer Shuter, director
"George Did It," is desirous of s<
Ing a man to play the music for
opera at rehearsals. Any men
can read music and who wish to
out for this position should see
Shuter at 2 o'clock Wednesday a
noon; in room 308 'of the Union.
TRYOUTS REPORT
FOR FRENCH PL
The following are requested t C
port for further tryouts for the
cle Francais play at 7:30 o'clock
evening in room 202 University.]
Harriet Gustin, '22 Ethel' Willi
'21, Bernice Warsaw, M. Beckett,
Rose Gutterman, '21, David W
'21, Ray Kenrick, '23E, A. C. F
'20, H.' Ranft, '21, and P. N. Ma
tay, '22.
It is requested by the director
more candidates, especially men,
port at this tryout. Cercle Frat
members as well as non-wombers
urged to be present tonight.
Later in the month candidates
report for the chorus parts w
form a small part of the second a

TWO REP E I h
TREATY

'1

II

I1

ri x__

an
v- jMAKE-UP EXAMINATION IN
ar SOCIOLOGY 19 ANNOUNOED'
in All those who were unable to take
eli their examination in Sociology 19 at"
air the regular time will be permitted to
;al take a :make-up examination at 91
im o'clock Saturday, March 6, in room
of 203 Economics building. Any who are'
he unable to be present at this time will
make other arrangements with Mr.I
as Holmes. -

by t

untry he w

an assistant
made a full
ien went to
had been ex-
to Michigan

V

1 char-I

FRESHMAN ENGINEERS HOLD .
..INITIAL ASSEMBLY TODAY
Prof. C. T. Johnson, head of the
surveying department in the engineer-
ing college, will talk to freshman en-
.ineers before their assemly at 11.
o'clock today. This talk will be the
first of a series to be given by mem-
bers of the engineering faculty and
will deal with the relation of 'the en-
ginee, to society.

"M's" for Various Sports
According to the petition which was
passed upon favorably by. the Board,
the blankets will bear "M's" for the
various branches of sport in which the
recipient competed and under the "M"
will be stars showing the number of
years that the "M" was won. in that
branch. It isprobable that It will be
held late in the Spring.
ST. CLAIR COUNT.Y STUDENTS
EFFECT FIRST ORUJNIZATION
Students from Port Huron and sur-
rounding towns met last night in the
Union for the purpose of formulating
a club of all students in this Univer-
sity from Saint Clair county. This is
the first attempt ever made t) gather
together students from that section
of Michigan. Harry Carey, '20, was
eleced temporary chairman, and Gor-
don Buckner, '21, temporary secretary.
.A publicity committee was named and
the date for the next meeting set for

il

,

Piro Hounoeops

to Receive Degrees
athic medical stu-
ompleted their work,
not received their di-
ably receive them af-
eeting of the Board
ording to Dr. G. I

DAILY

yet I
will

'I

Sophomores a
men are wante
the editorial sta
See the ne1ws e

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