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March 02, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-02

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04

I DAY A

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 1920.90PR

NEW

VARSITYTRAIN

VAL MEN GALLED
rsity Reservists Receive Call for
Two Weeks Summer Duty
STAR WILL JOIN
al reserve men at the Unlve -
re receiving notices to report
for active duty to cover a
of two weeks. This is in ac-
ce with the regulations sent out IS COACH YOST'S FIRST CHOICE;
nt of the ninth, tenth, and elev- HAS A COACHING
iaval districts, at Great Lakes,
requirements state that since TO BE FARRELL'S AIDE;
serves are required to maintain WILL REPORT IN FALL

1 nU acce any uLs&Uheut,
er requirement is that mem-
the reserve force, on inactive
1I be required, beginning July
o perform at least two weeks
uty for. training on ,a naval
achyear.
DENT HONORED BY
MNI OE N Y.oGITY
TOQNS COMMEND RETIR-
XECUTIVE; DR. BURTON
ATTENDS MEETING
ent Harry B. Hutchins has re-
.rom a meeting given in his
y the Michigan club of New
bere he was honored as the
'in,-, President of the. Univer-
veral resolutions were passed
his work during his incum-

The nr1eting was attended by Deane.
Henry M., Bates of the Law school,
s John R. Effinger of the literary col-
tG lege and l1otimer E. Cooley of the
en- engineering college. President-olect
'01, 'Marion Leroy Burton accompani&
A. President Hutchins who wished to
WSt present him to the alumni of New

Considered Best Track Man of Day
While Attending the
University
Archie Hahn, '04, has accepted the
position of football trainer and as-
sistant track coach at the University.
This advice was given out yesterday
afternoon-by Athletic Director P. G.1
Bartelme following the receipt of a;
message from Hahn stating that he
would accept on the terms approved
by the Board in Control.
Hahn, who is Coach Yost's first
choice as a trainer, was ccnsidered
the best track man of his cay while'
in college. In 1904 he ran the 100
yard dash in :09 4-5, and the 220 in
:21 3-5. The latter has been the Con-
ference record since that time. It has
since been equaled but not beaten.
Wins-Events in Olympics
'In the Olympian games in 1904, held
in St. Louis, Hahn won first place in
the 60, 100, and 200 meter runs. He
was again member of the Olympian
team in 1908, when he won the dashes.
During the first eight years after
graduation Hahn'coacl ed at . Whit-
man college in Oregon. At this time
this school was in the Northwest con-
ference. When Berkeley and Leland'
Stanford were' admitted to the confer-'
ence, Whitman was crowded out.',
Goes to Brown
At this "time Hahn went to Brown
as track coach and assistant football'
coach. Later he was appointed foot-
ball trainer. Dapring his five years
there he has trained some of the beat
football squads in the east. In 1916,
the year that Pollard was considered
the greatest backfield man In the east,
Colgate was the only college which
succeeded In defeats g Brown.
While in college Hahn played on
class football teams, but Coach Fitz-
patrick would not allow him to try
out for the Varsity. Since lea#ing
college, he has coached every sport
excepting baseball.
Hahn will report in the fall in time
to assume charge of training the foot-
ball men. i
MICHIGAN GRAD BURNED TO
DEATH IN AIRPLANE PLUNGE

M. A. C. RAISES PAY
Instructors at Aggie College Receive
More Than at University
As a result of a salary increase Just
granted, instructors at Michigan Ag-
ricultural college 'will receive $300
more pay yearly than those at the
Unlversfty, of Michigan.
The increase, 'which is effective
throughout the entire faculty, provides
tfor the following salaries: Deans will
receive a minimum of $4,200 per year;
heads of departments $3,750; associ-
ate professors, $2,800; assistant pro-
fessors, $2,400; instructors in the
service three years or more $2,200 and
instructors in service first year $1,800.
Instructors here are paid $1,500 per
year regardless of term of service.
. Unrest among instructors Is given
as the reason for the salary raise at
M. A. C. A wholesale wlk-out had
been threatened unless proper in-
creases were granted. It is stated that
Jn nearly every case the teachers are
now well satisfied.
SPEEDY0SUCKER
DWN MICHIGA
Eight 'oint Lead Gained at Outset by
Illinois, Too Much for Wolverines
to Overcome
CARNEY AND COMPANY COUNT
28 POINTS TO NATHERTEN'S 21
In the fastest game seen in Water-
man gymnasium this year the Illinois'
basketball quin tet downed the Wol-
verine five 28 to 21 last night.
The individual 'star of the encoun-
ter was Carney, the husky Suck
center. Although closely guarded
throughout the whole game, he man-
aged to throw five baskets from the
ielda andma' seven out of 10; at-
tempts from the foul line. Rea's phe-
nomenal long shots and the remark-
able dribbling of, Karpus were the
bright spots in Michigan's playing.
Elim! Start with Rush
Carney and company started with a
rush and had rung up eight coun-
ters before the Wolverines awere able
to locate the basket. Rea then scored
a difficult one from the side of t he
floor, starting the Michigan ball roll-
ing.
Duke Dunne's *sole basket was the:
Mi st sensational incidet of the even-
ing. The big center managed to tip
the ball into the basket from a jump-
off, *although he was a good six feet
from the ring.
Three Substitutes
Wilson, Weiss. and Henderson were
put in for Williams, I4ea, and Dunne1
in the second half. Rea was forced to
leave the game when he fell heavily
and liurt his knee.
Although the crowd did not hiss ast
much "as in the Chicago game, there;
was still a tendency to show scorn for
the referee's decisions. The Illinois
'quiutetl were penalized for stalling in
the closing minutes of the game. 1
" The band was on hand for the first
time this season and added material-
ly to the spirit and enthusiasm of the
crowd. .

GENERAL WOOD DISCUSSES PRO
OfN~~g N N NIMPORTANCE BEFORE LARGE I

of

President also attended a meet-
the Board of Trustees of the Am-
University Union in Europe of

-I

ich he is the president:
rO FOREIGNERS AMONG NEW
GRAD -SCHOOL MATRICILANTS

SENIOR LITS, NOTICE!l
Sedior lits will meet at 4
o'clock Wedryesiay in room 20,
Mason hall for the purpose of
hearing the reports of the treas-
urer, the Cap and Gown commit .
tee, and the Pipe and Cane com-
mittee. Regular business will
also be taken up. All,, senior
lits are urged to attend.;
As Wood Sees It
Stand steady! Hold on to the Con-
stitution. "
We must spread the burden of the
war.
The world is crying for production.
We have got to take a strangle hold
on the excess profits tax.
The merchant marine is one of the
things we want to take a big inter-
et 'In.
Accept the League of rIations with
thoroughly American reservations.
We can arbitrate best if we are right-
eous' and strong.
We should hae a budget system
The rights of property are absolutely
\sacred.
We welcome immigrants with an hon-
est Intention to assimilate them-
selves to America.
Niney-ive per cent of Ameican labor
is square. You must be honest with
labor. Labor, also, must be honest.
You can't always drive!.
We are not paying our-profkssors and
teachers enouh. There is no more
important work in the country than
that of the teacher.
The red flag never waves over the
house of the farmer who owns his
own farm.
Let's pay 'attention to our agricul-
ture.
We want a strong but conciliatory for-.
eign Policy
We want to stand for one fag, one
language, one loyalty.
Put Amrica Bfrst!
.FRESHMEN TOLD OF SCIENTIFIC
WORK OF DARWIN AND PASTEUR
Prof. Harley H. Bartlett, associate
professor of 'botany, spoke on the
botanical sciences for the second time
Monday' afternoon bfore the fresh-
man ;lit assembly. His. talk covered
the additions to science which were
made 'by the discoveries of Charles
Darwin and Pasteur.
"It was not known before Pasteur's
time that there' were microbes -in the
air," stated Professor Bartlett. "Un-
til 190, there were still scientific men
who believed in spontaneous genera-
tion of some of the lower forms of
life, buit Pasteur abolished this idea
with his proof of the existence .of
bacteria."
Among the accomplishments of
Pasteur, according to Professor Bart-
lett, 'who told of their development,
was the cure of hydrophobia and the
establishment of the Pasteur institute
in 'Paris and also in Russia. Tlhn
also came the cure of diphtheria, al-
though this was not entirely Pastur's
discovery.
COMPOSER OF FORMER UNION
OPERA MUSIC VISITS HERE
Seymour, B. Simons, '17E, hAs been
in the city for a' few days. Mr. Si-
mons will be,remembered as compos-
er of much of the music for the Mich-
igan Union operas produced whilp he
was i the University.

"Let 'er Flicker," a musical come-
dy for which Mr. Simons wrote music
and lyrics, was produced in Detroit
at Orchestra hall last week. It was
produced under the direction of Wal-
do E. Fellows, '14,

LEAGUE OF NATI'ON
QUESTIONS, FOREIGN
ISCUSSED
1-
TEACHERS ARE G
UNDERPAID, HE
IVgorous Applause Greets
of Candidatefor G.
Nomination
General Leonard A. Woo
last night before an audien
ed the Whitney theater at
We his strongest utterao
ered in turn te"questions
chant marine, the League
a national budgeta syster
tion, employment agencie
'oldiers, labor, schools, pu
and foreign policy. Sever
p'eople were unable to ge
theater.
Relave to the League
General Wood said: "My
accept the league wlth
4American reservations w
America free to express
ments through the instn
provided by the Constitt
statement was vigorously
Welcome Honest Iinn
S"We welcome the 1imm
comes here with the hone
of assimilating himself
American people," he deel
ought to turn faces like f
the immigrant who comes
avowed intention of cha
government."
He suggested "lookingin
ity of the ,immigrants' on
side" for the purpose of al
the proper type of immigr
the country.
Labor-Capital DisPut
The trouble between
ca'pital is as ld as the
speaker stated. "You car
It out of existence becausc
got to-apply the golden ru
five jiercent of Amerian
square and waits to do
thing. You must be hnest
and give it a good wage.
be honest and must give
day's work, for a day's wa
is neither a chattel nor
ity. It's human and must
htunanly.
Professors Underp
"We are not paying pr
teachers nearly enoughi," I
in commenting on the sch
country. "These men are
a duty second to none. The;
ing up the ship of state a
want the people who are
the ship of state to be un
Universal Train
Speaking oi the country
a strong army and univer
training, he said: "Someti
it Is, you have to preserve
in order to preserve the
'great heap of dead in t
-were not the dead ' the
of unpreparedness.
"The statement, it's a m
ocritical sentimentalityf
Wmen to war but refuses I
ing," received great applar
y
DETROITER WILL LECT
BUSINESS SUBJEcT
Mr. Ward Gavett of R. I
comp ny of Detroit, will gir
on "Primary Sources of G
'Lists for Advertisers and?
at 7:30 o'clock t onigt i I
ium of the Natural Science
This lecture is considers
special interest to students
9E and ,10E.

Two University Students
Two students of the
were granted their natural
week due to the'fact they
orable discharges from t
States army. They are:
Laurie,- 22L, formerly a

n- Included among the 76 students
irgs of newly enrolled in the Graduate school
o temare a Spaniard who came here from
them his country to do pathological work
under Dr. Warthin; and two Filipinos,
0 coun- one of whom came direct from the
a great Philippines for graduate work in pol-
There itical science.
ielUni- The majority of those comprising'
Lat wasthe new enrollment for the second
Chilean semester are Michigan graduates with
under- the exception of 10 or 12 who have
come from other campuses. This
brings the enrollmentin this school
F!OR for the year 1919-20 up to 324 stu-
OUNTS dents, a figure which compares fav-
orably with' the records of former
s bank years.
begin- According to reports from Dean
11 tran- Lloyd's office, the Graduate school,
be 50 the enrollment of which dropped to
th in- about 93 last year, is rapidly ap-
proaching its pre-war status in every
tuse of way.
it was
he stu- SENOR SCATORI WILL GIVE,
rate ILLUSTRATED TALK TOlIgT
mate-
easons Senor Stephen Scatori will deliver
an illustrated talk ats 7:30 o'clock to-
avings night in the lecture room in Tappan
is sort hall. He will speak on the early Span-
at in ish explorers and early Spanish wars
being in this hemisphere as shown by arch-
itectural remains found in the South
today
Tickets may be purchased at the
door for 15 cents. Members of La So-
"Re ciedad Hispanica will be admitted
i"R-free.
r plan __
opul& FOMR-ER MICHIGAN ARCHITECT
sand, SUCCUMBS TO INFLUENZA
of the
ivs to' ;
on the . A. Roy Gatzke, ex-'19A, died on Feb.
. The 26 at the home of his mother in Wyan-
pus of dotte, Mich. Gatzke had been 11 for
in the several weeks and was unable to with-
d take stand an attack of influenza. At the
n min- time of his death he was engaged in
ed by making research .drawings and de-
recede tails for a small Snanish mission in

Horace M. H Corey, '16E, was burn-
er to death Sunday, when apn airplane
which he was testing plunged to the
earth from a height of 1,500 feet-at
the army field in San Antonio, Tex.
Corey was ascending to test a. new
motor in the machine, when at a
height of 1,500 feets the machine
caught on fire and dove straight to,
the earth.
Carey played on the All-fresh foot-
ball team and made on "R" 'on the
Va'rity team when in school. He
was a member of Lambda Chi Al-
pha fraternity.
Corey had been in the service more
than two years and was overseas a
part of the time. He was acting as
instructor in squadron 90 of the air
service at the San Antonio field at the
time of hs deai.
FIRST PORT HURON CLUB
TO BE ' ORGANIZED TONIGHT
For the first time in history, a Port
Huron club will be organized at
Michigan. The first meeting of the or-
ganization will be held at 7:15 o'clock*
tonight on the third floor of the Una
ion. All students from St. Clair coun-
ty will be eligible for membership.
As the committee in charge was un-
able to secure a.meeting room in the
Union' for both men and women, the
session tonight will be for male stu-
dents only. It is expected that at
the meeting tonight officers will be
elected and plans made for the work
of 'the club throughout St. Clair coon-

The Lineup
The teams lined ip as follows:
Karpus ...L.F... Ingwerson
Rea ..........R..........Taylor
Dunne ....................Carney'
Williams'.. ,....L.G..:..... Walquist
Peare... . R.G...........Vail
Final score-Illinois 28, Michigan 21.
Score at end of first haff-Illinois
16, Michigan 10. Substitutions-
Michigan, Wilson for Williams, Weiss
for Rea, Henderson for Dunne. Bas-
kets fromt field-Carney 5S, Taylor 2,
Ingwerson 2, Walquist 1, Vail 1, Kar-
1jus 2, Rea 3, Dunne 1, Henderson 1,'
Peare 1. Baskets from foul-Carney
7 in 10, Karpus 5 in 10. Referee--
Peckinpaugh. Umpire--Cook.
Dr. Stanley Returns from Chicago
Dr. Albert A. Stanley has returned
rom Chicago, where he was in con-
ference with Frederick Stock, conduc-
tor of the Chicago Symphony orches-
tra, for the purpose of working out
final details regarding the May Fes-
tival programs.

Opera Posters Due Wednesday
Poster designs for the opera mu
e handed in to- Mr. Shuter at I

i

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