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February 28, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-28

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1920.

PRICE.

MINIMMIM IIIMilIII INIIIIIIIIII II IIIII I I I I I I II MP R ICE-

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T ENGINEERMEETINGS

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FICIALS

ADVOCATES
IN BUILDING
asses All Previous

ace the Sixth
highway en-
early every
inty highway
kc part, came

Freshmen To Have Assemblies Every
Wednesday in University Hall
Announcement has been made by
the mentor committee of the Engineer-
ing college of the time and place of
class assemblies for the second se-
mester. They are as follows:
Senior class-Thursday, March 11,
at 8 o'clock; Friday, April 2, at 9
o'clock; Monday, April 26, at 10
o'clock; Tuesday, May 25, at 11
o'clock. All assemblies will be in
room 348, Engineering building.
Junior class-Tuesday, March 9, at
8 o'clock; Thursday, April 1, at 9
o'clock; Friday, April 30, at 10
o'clock; Monday, May 24, at 11 o'clock.
All assemblies will be in room 348,
Engineering building.
Sophomore class-Monday, March 8,
at 8 o'clock; Tuesday, March 30, at
9 o'clock; Thursday, April 29, at 10
o'clock; Friday, May 28, at 11 o'clock.
All assemblies will be in room 348,,
Engineering building.
Freshman class-Every Wednesday
at 11 o'clock in University hall.
U, OF M, UNSUPAISUFO
ORUlEDICAL RESEARCH
-DR. HUGH CABOT
CARE OF PUBLIC HEALTH BY
STATE IS INEVI-
TABLE
That the University of Michigan, as
a laboratory for working out the
problems of medicine, is the most
satisfactory in the country, vas the',

TO HOCKEY TEAM
Ithletic Assoclftilon Board of Direct.
ors Makes Changes In
Constitution
STUDENT SiPORT MANAGERS TO
HAVE DISTINCTIVE INSIGNIA
Changes in the Athletic association
constitution, and the awarding of-jer-
seys to the hockey team and athletic
managers were the principal matters
discussed at the meeting of the board
of directors of the Athletic associa-
tion yes'terday.
Blue jerseys bearing tie respective
class numerals of the players in white
will be given to the men composing
the informal hockey team, which has
represented Michigan this year.
Awarding of "M's" was impossible on
account of the fact that the hockey"
team has not been as yet recognized
as a Varsity sport.
Notion Passed
All managers of athletic teams will
wear, according to a motion passed
at the meeting, blue, V-necked jer-
seys with an "M" simliar to the letter
awarded the track team. This "M"
will bear 'the letters M, G, and R. in
,he spaces inside the "M", which will
represent the abbreviation of "man-
ager."

Noted Actress Opposed To Wearing
Furs; Wants To Institute Reform

"Why is it," said Mrs. Fiske, noted
actress who played in "Mis' Nelly of
N' Orleans" at the Whitney Thursday
night, "that while we have numerous
huma'ne societies for the protection of
animals, trapping is wholly unregu-
latei. Not only for.the sake of the
animals but also for the trappers
themselves, who are necessarily de-
DAILY WILL PUBLISH -
DIRECTORY SUPPLEMENT
The Michigan Daily, following
a custom established last year,
will compile a supplement to the
official Students' Directory, for
the benefit of those who arrived
late in the Univertity, and to
correct unavoidable errors and
changes in the. regular edition.
Name,- class, Ann, Arbor ad-
dress, home town and Ann Arbor
phone number, in the order nam-
ed, should be placed on a one
cent post card and mailed to the
Directory Editor, The Daily,
Press building, City, before Mar.
3. No names will'be accepted
after that date.
DAILY SUPPLEMENT TO0
BE PULISED SUNDAY,
FEATURE EDITION WILL CONTAIN
FROM TEN TO TWELVE
PAGES

with the construc-
ance of public roads
with particular em-
to obtaining the
for every dollar

ALLIED PREMIEI
AWAIT WILSON
ADRIATIC 01SF

graded by their inhuman occupation,
should there be laws, controlling and
restricting the slaughter of animals
for their furs." -
Mrs. Fiske herself wears no furs.
She professed herself to be much in-
terested in instituting a reform in
trapping.
Co-operation Promised
"Soon there will be an anti-trapping
association," she predicted. "The head
of the Animal Welfare association in
Detroit has promised, me co-opera-
tion. Many Boy Scout leaders are in
favor of the movement. I think that
trapping should be practiced only at
certain times by certain people and
that rules should goyern this game as
they do all others. (
"I admit I am a radical," Mrs.
Fiske continued. "Ii think that furs
are not a necessity inĀ°'this blimate at
least. Women wear their for adorn-
ment. If I had my way, no pnimals
would be killed for the sake of their
furs. A great many women in Tole-
do have become interested in this
movement and have agreed not to
swear furs of any kind."
Favors Campus Theater
Mrs. Fiske met the members of the
Comedy club after her appearance
Thursday night. She expressed her-
'self as strongly in favor of a Uni-
versity theater.
"If the dramatic talent at this Uni-
versity is ;in proportion, to that in
other universities of its size," Mrs..
Fiske concluded, "the need of a cam-
pus theater is unquestionable."
HOCKEY TEAM ANNEXES
FOURTH VICTOR YJU5TO2

OBSERVE PR
WORD AS.

Records 1
ear broke all

F

READY TO WITHDRAW ALL]P
VIOUS PROPOSALS
MADE

e for
ct to
was
the

ant points of

perfection of
hereby books
Les, so as to
ad results of

ted "for the fur- statement ,of Dr. Hugh Cabot of the
ion between the Medical school in a speech before the
tment and the Congregational King's Daughters 'yes-
loners. terday. Its central position in this
"a country and its general perfection
ne of the prom- along necessary lines makes this pos-
governor, and sible, said Dr. Cabot.
he first man in He further declared that the system
concrete road," of state medicine or the care of pub-
sity of looking lic health by the state is inevitable.
highway trans- "We cannot go on in our present
g this foresight vague system," said Dr. Cabot. "The
struction of ade- income of the physician at the pres-
I ample widths. ent time does not depend on that phys-
made, for the ician's skill. It depends on his clever-
hi Annual Short ness and success. Unless something
efore, under the is done we shall have health insur-
neering college. once. The alternative is state medi-
- . cine. -
"My fear is thathe thing will come
Dance too quickly. It is not to be avoided
by practitioners and societies. State
Today medicine in some form is inevitable.
"The hospital of the state univer-
ial life for the sity mday be the center of state med-
ill give its first icine. I am'afraid of state medicine be-
2:30 to' 5:$0 coming the mere creature of the
in the Union. state, but it must come.

Make Revisions
The board of direct rs, consisting
of the managers, the intramural di-
rector, and the Athletic director also
made progress towardthe revision f
the constitution. of the Athletic assO -
clation.
This work has been in progress for
some time and the entire constitution
and by-laws will be subject to
change. The work yesterday after-
noon was lar'gely advisory and will
not be made public until the final
changes have been made.

Invite American Executive to
Part in Proposed Settlement
of Dispute
(By Associated Press)
London, Feb. 27. - The allied
miers never intended to make a
rite settlement of the Adriatic
tion without .obtaining the viev
the United States government,
ident Wilson is informed in tb
ply to his latest note on the su
which reached Washington toda
The absence of an American i
'sentative, the reply said, has p
an almost insurmountable obstai
the peace negotiations.
Await Wilson's Word
The premiers observed the fa
of the greatest importance that
ident Wilson expresses a willin
to accept any settlement mut
agreeable to Italy and Jugo-S
regarding their common fronti
the Fiume region, provided the a
ment is not made at the expen
a third power. This, the prei
agreed, would be an ideal way o
tling the question, and they expr
willingness to do their utmos
reach a settlement on-this basis
In order to facilitate this pr
they are'ready to withdraw thir
posals of Dec. 9 and Jan. 20, be(
they believe that if the party
cipally concerned believes the
and associated powers are comnn
to supporting them in any parti
solution it will be more difficu
secure a voluntary agreement.
h Ask President to Join
The premiers, therefore, cord
invite the president to join them
formal proposal to the Italian
,Jugo-Slav government and to 1
,tiate an a reement on the basi
withdraw of all previous propo
CHIMES 'MANAGER
HAS BREAKDOV

iomore affair,
joint action
of the various
Miss Grace
physical edu-
in, social di-
ry residence'
director of
G. W. Pat-
fhipple have
ones for the

WOOD SUPPORTERS PLAN DINNER
WEDNESDAY TO PERFECT LEAGUE'
Student supporters of General
Leonard Wood, candidate for the Re-
publican nomination for president,
will meet at a get-together dinner at
6 o'clock Wednesday, at the Union,
when they will elect permanent of-
ficers and' perfect the organizatton
of a Wood league on the campus.
The temporary organization of the-
Wood league, which was chosen at the
Wood rally on Thursday night, has
made arrangements for the dinner'
which -will be open to all Wood sup-
porters. Tickets will be put on sale
on Tuesday at the desk in the Union,
and these wil be available for 'all
persons who wish to attend the din-
ner. ,

S1LIkN COMES MARCH 6
Humorist Will Appear Under Au-
spices of Oratorical Association
Strickland Gillilan, humorist, writ-
er, and lecturer will ad1l.ss a Univer-
sity audience Saturday, March 6, in
Hill auditorium as the next speaker on
the' Oratorical association program.
"Mr. Gillilan has been lecturing and
writing for more than 20 years and is
one of the most popular humorists on
the American platform," said Prof.
Thomas C. Trueblood of the oratory
department. He went on to say, "Mr.
Gillilan is much 'sought after as a
rader of his own poems and of his
special articles. Hishumor is of the
finest, clean-cut, human, and sincere
type. I believe he will be a genuine
attraction and will provide real hum-
or."
The speaker has ,wriitten several,
books of humor, of which the best
known is probably, "Off Again, On
Again, Gone Again, Finnigin." He
writes for seve'al magazines now and
one of his articles appears practical-
ly every mont.
The speaker on the program of the
Oratorical association, who will- prob-
ably follow Mr. Gillilan, is Hon..ames
W. Gerard, former American ambass-
ador to Germany. It has not been as-
certained when he will be able to be
here, but the association is in com-
munication with him and the exact
date will be announced later.

Following out the system employed
by the leading metropolitan newspa-
pers, The Daily will publish a spe-
clal feature supplement in connection
with the regular Sunday edition.
starting with tomorrow's issue. This
weekly feature edition is the first of
its kind in the field of college news-
papers, and it will contain from 10
to 12 pages. f
To Have Feature Section
In addition to the regular news
pages, the Sunday -edition will con-
tain special feature stories having to
do with the various campus activi-
ties,. Two pages will be devoted to
sports with articles by the leading
authorities on Michigan athletics.
Church news will be contained on a
special page with announcements of
Cervices in all local churches, to-
gether with articles on the various'
religious movements throughout the
country. -
Theater announcements for the
coming week, music notes, and book
reviews are all to receive additional
space, many of the articles being sign-
.ed. Articles on various topics will
also appear from time to time, writ-
ten by prominent faculty members of
the University.
Bernstein Is Editor
Material for the Sunday supplement
will be compiled during the week un-
der the editorship of Joseph A. Bern-
stein, '22, assisted by a corps of as-
sistants. Communications- and all
other material should- be turned in
at The Daily office no later than Wed-
nesday in order to receive space in
the Sunday supplement edition.

WATERSTON SEXTET UNABLE
KEEP UP WITH PACE SET
BY MICHIGAN

Michigan's informal hockey team
added another victory to its string,
last night when it defeated the Wat-
erston sextet by the score of. 5 to 2,
The game was fast and wells played
throughout.
Michigan ran away from her oppon-
ent during the first period, getting
four goals during that time. With
the advent of Wonnacot in the last two
periods, the scoring stopped and only
one goal was made after that.
Barkell Stars
Barkell, as usual, was the scoring
star of the game. The spee, cent-
er rang up three counters during the
first period aid one in the last. Cap-
tain Kerr ,got the other Michigan
point. Richards did stellar work on
defense. Michigan's team work show-
ed up unusually well in the first per-
iod, and the team, playing in its pre-
sent' form, should have little dif-
ficulty in downing the Rayl aggrega-
tion tonight.
Captain Shell, Michael, and Stan-
ton played the best games for the vis-
itors. Each of the first two scored
one goal and were invaluable men
both onoffense and defense.tStanton
was the individual star of the team.
Wonnacot, who played goal during
the last two periods, displayed re-
markable form.

TOI

its, are on
nds of the
secured at
ed number
ed of pre-
aid before
to attend
a motion
lits at a
gn. It is
aid either
or when
ot be on
ations can
with the
ittee Mon-
Trainer
- Larry

AIRPLANE FALLS FIVE MILES WITH
UNCONCIOUS PILOT; LANDS SAFELY

Aviator Suffers Only Severe Shock
and Temporary Blindness
(By Associated Press)'
Dayton, Ohio, Feb. 27.-An airplane
carrying Major H. W. Schroeder, at
the Dayton field today, fell over five
miles after reaching the altitude of
36,040 feet, said to be 5,020 feet higher
than the world's record.
Tonight the major is in a hospital
doctoring for shock and temporary
practical blindness. Instruments on
the machine indicated that it fell more
than five miles in two minutes.'Major
Schroeder 'lost consciousness when his

his eyes frozen shut in a temperature
said to have been 67 degrees below
zero.
Schroeder, however, regained partial
consciousness when 2,000 feet above
the earth in time to right his machine=
and prevent it from crashing to the
ground, out of control.

DORMS ADVOCATED
BY COLLEGE DEANS
It is the opinion of the Conference
of Deans and Advisor's of Men held
on Feb. 20 and 21, at Urbana, Ill., at
which Prof. Louis A. Strauss was
Michign's representative, that uni-
versities should make every effort to
control the living conditions of its
students.
The resolution to 'this effect, which
was unanimously adopted by the con-
ference was: "Resolved, That it is
the opinion and recommendation of
this conference that' the universities
represented should make every ef-
'fort to control the living conditions of
its students, and this end can be best
secured by the establishment of dorm-
itories and commons for both men;
and women."
The universities which were repre-
sented at this conference were Indi-
ana, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Minne-
sota, James Milliken, Micgigan, Pur-
due, and Wisconsin. Three other in-
stitutions intended to send represent-
atives 'but were unable to do so.,

r)

Lineup
The lineup was as follows:
Michigan Waterston
Barked..........C........Stanton
Kerr (Capt.)....L.W......McFarland
;Anderson.....R.W.....Shell (Capt.).
MacDuff.... . P....... . Michael
Kahn .... .:C.P.......Connelly
Richards .........G... ..... Kupfer
Substitutioii--Cannon for Ander-
son, Follis for MacDuff, MacDuff for
Follis, Wonnacot for Kupfer, Lovelace
for McFarland. Goals: first period-
Barkell in 5, 12 and 3 minutes and
Kerr in 8; second period-Shell in 2
minutes, Barkell in 6; third period-
Michael in 8 minutes. Referee, Barss,
Michigan.

Walter S. Reiss, '21, business ma
ager of the Michigan Chimes, who w
taken ill during the past week a'
ordered home "for a rest by physi
lans, will be unable to return ,to t
University for approximately a mon
advice from his bed side ,it his hor
in Toledo, declares.
Riess' condition has developed in
a complete nervous breakdown, phy
icians say, due to his failure to gi
in to a slighf attack of the flu. 1
spite his condition, Reiss continue
work on the campus and in his clas
rooms until ordered home by physi
ians.
During his absence t} e business d
partment of the Chimes will be ten
'porarily under the nanagement of
board of managers, composed of Ste,
art Sonne, '20, credit manager, Georg
Cadwell, '21L, circulation manage
and Robert McKean, '21.
When Reiss finally succumbed
the nervous attack, a week ago, I
was take'n to St. Joseph's hospit
where he remained until he was ab
to make the trip to his home in T
ledo. His condition at present,3
favorable, reports say, but it will tal
;sometime for him to recuperate.
ALICE HUNT WILL
LECTURE MONDAI
Alice Riggs Hunt, press'represent
tive to the American commissiont
negotiate peace, will speak on "Pe
sonalities of the European Labo
World," at 8 o'clock Monday evenin
in the Natural Science auditoriun
under the auspices of the Interco
legiate Socialist society.
Miss Hunt is a woman's suffrag
organizer, a special correspondeD
for the-New York Eveninig Post, and
writer for magazines in the Unite
States, England and France. As
correspondent Miss Hunt was pre
sent at the peace conference, and ha
just returned from an' extensive toi

' CHIMES WANTS TRYOUTS

Uy

iii
II

NSophomores wishing to try
out for the Chimes business
staff may apply at the Chimes
office in the Press building be-
tween 1 and 2 o'clock on week
days.

Missouri Picked to Win Talley Title
Kansas City, Mo, Feb. 27.-The Uni-
versity of MissourI basketball quintet
is picked by basketball followers as
the probable champion of the 1920 sea-
son in the Missouri Valley Athletic
conference. The Tigers won 10,
straight conference games. They have
met and defeated all the stronger.
teams of the conference, such as the
University of Kansas, the Kansas Ag-
gies, Washington University of St.
Louis, and the Iowa Avgi4"

vi

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