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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1920.

PRICE

r

ES
TODAY:

REPUBLICANS PLAN
TO ORAIEHERE

.Aichigan Graduate Dies While On
Way To Secure body Of Dead Son

Dues for the sophomore lit class
will, be collected from 9 to 12 and
frpm 2 to 5 o'clock today and, Friday
in the corridor of 'Qpiversity hall. The
fee includes the assessment for both
the first and the sdeQnd semesters, the
total of which is $1.
Students will be in the booth to take
the money and give the receipts. Pay-
ment of dues is necessary before grad-
uation, and George F. Stone, treasur-
er, urges every member of the class
to settle up now.
"With the approach of a number of
parties and the Proni, it is essential
that the class collect all the money
possible, especially since at the pres-
ent time the treasury is rather low,"
said Stone.

i~l

f tUtHLL RLNIM UII
IR0GIMRIERDISTRICT.
DALRYMPLE SAYS WORSTING OF
FORCES, SERIOUS
BLOW

I

le were more
ctions, how-
the treaty on
>er declaring
tain.
eded that the
aitted to drag
nless two or
n both sides
a 'final test'
the issue, if

Hutchins left
>r New York,
neeting of 'the
the American
rope, of which
annual dinner
an Alumni as-

Iron River, Feb. 25. - Thirty-five
federal agents and a number of the
Michigan State constabulary, who ar-
rived last night under Maj. A. V.
Dalrymple, prohibition commissioner,,
for central states to "clean up" Iron,
county, tonight were en route back
home while Major Dalrymple was on
his way to Washington to confer
with Prohibition Commissioner John
Kramer.
Called Off
Major Dalrymple, who led ,the arm-
ed expedition' to Iron River, for the
avowed purpose of arresting county
and village 'officers on-charges of con-
spiracy to obstruct enforcement of the
prohibition law, was called off by Mr.
Kramer and ordered to meet the op-'
posinig side and seek a' compromise
without legal action.
Worsting of the federal agents it
the first clash with state officers in
the enforcement of the 18th amend-
ment was a serious blow to enforce-
ment of the dry law, Major Dalrym-
ple declared before his departure.
Withholds Action
Martin F. McDonough, prosecuting
attorney for Iron county and leader of
thie county authorities, who Major
Dalrykple, declared were in "open
revolt" against the United States, re-
cpived a telegrap today from Dis-
trict Attorney Myron H. Walker, at
Grand Rtapids, advising him to take
no action until the district atorney
could come to investigate.

also be
k- 4n-.

'G. 0. P. Students Plan Formation of
Gamn a Omicron P1 Chapter
on Campus
MICHIGAN FOURTH OF LARGE
UNIVERSITIES TAKING STEP
Republicans on the campus took the
first steps toward organizing a local
chapter of Gamma Omicron Pi, the
national society of collegiate Repub-
licans, at a meeting Wednesday even-
ing.
Gamma Omicron Pi is-' an organiz-
tion for the promotion and develop-
mentof the best interests of the Re-
publican party, among the students,
faculty and alumni of th, various uni-
versities and colleges of the country.
It Is nt"confined 'to men of voting
age, but includes all college men with
G. 0. P. tendencies.
Aid Furnished
The University of-,llinois was the
first to organize, and at present sev-
eral of the other larger institutions in
the country aye taking a similar step,
Michigan being the fourth. The Na-
tional Republican committee is be-
hind the society and lends aid finan-
cially and by furnishing speakers to
the various chapters.
" Committee Appointed
The ,results of this gathering will
be put before the Wood meeting to-
night, and next "week a general Re-
publ4can smoker will be held for the
purpose of electing officers. The in-
stallation of offieers will follow the
smoker, and it is hoped by those In
charge that Elihu Root, of the Repub-
lican National committee, will be pres-
ent at that time.
The committee appointed last even-
ing to take charge of the drafting of
the constitution and other work nec-
essary for organization was: H. Fred
Boron, '21, qhairman, C. B. Fisk
Bangs, '21L, secretary, William P,.
Smith, ex-'19, E. W. Cross, '20, John
Herlihy, '20, F. H. Iauder, '22L.
LETBOOKS SH
Old Letters Attract Great Interest;
Tales of Explorations in Collection
Seventy-five books from Regent
plements' library which was recently
donated 'to the University were on
exhibition here when the Library was
dedicated. These are said by Librar-
ian W.. W. Bishop to be the best
volumes .in the collection.
Columbus' letter to Ferdinand and
Isabella's secretary, Sanchez, printed
in Rome in 149 and describing in his
own words Vrhat he saw on his first
voyage, was one of the most interest-
ing manuscripts in the collection. The
exhibit dealt with the discovery and
colonization period of American his-
tory and" was arranged chronologi,
ally.
- Of Historical Interest
Practically all of ,the discoverers
were represented. There was the first
printed- account of Magellan's voyage,
the first edition of the Italian of
Corte's second and, third letters, Ca-
beca de Vaca's account of his expedi-
tion acros ,the Gulf states, Cartier's
discovery of Canada, and: many oth-
ers.
Also contained in the collection was
Hariot's "Virginia," which is said to
have affoided more authentic mate-
rials for early history of the Atlantic
coast, from the River May to the Ches-
apeake, than any other book Anoth-
er well known book is Mather's "Mag-
nalia Christi Americana," which was
printed in London in 1702.
Plans Not Complete

Neither the exact location nor the
style of the building which is to house
Regent Clements' library has been de-
cided upon. Opinion exists that the
$200,000 building will be about two-
thirds the size of Alumni Memorial
hall and will be similarly designed.
"The new building will probably be
near the general Library," stated Li-
brarian Bishop.
Kings Daughters to Hear Dr. Cabot
Dr. Hugh Cabot of the Medical
school will address the members of
the Congregational Kings' Daughters.
on "The Prospective Development of
the University Hospital" at their meet-
ing Friday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. E. C. Goddard.

MICHIBAN WINS foM
D. d 1: HOCKEY TEAM

aerica.
who is now
to the din-

'1

DAILY WILL PUBLISH
DIRECTORY SUPPLEMENT
The Michigan Daily, following
a custom established last year,
will compile a supplement to the"
official Students' Directory, for
the benefit of those who arrived
late in the University, and to
correct unavoidable errors and
changes in the- regular edition.
Name, class, Ann Arbor ad-
dress, home town and Ann Arbor-
phone number, in the order nam-
ed, should be placed on a one.
cent post card and mailed to the
Directory, Editor, The Daily,
Press building, City, before Mar.
3. No names will be acgepted
after that date.

A

will also attena.
S MEETING
E CORPS HELD

the

in regular
it, in the
m of the
f the pub-
rot Marine
e discussed
romoting a
which will
some time

iK TO STARTON
JMNI CATALOGUE

DEFEAT DETROTERS BY r TO 1
SCORE; BARKELL STAR OF
CONTEST
Michigan's informal hockey team
won its third straight victory last
night when it defeated the Douglas
and Lomason team from Detroit by a
score of 5 to 1. The visiting team was
handicapped by the absence:of two of
its best players on account of illness.
All their men were fro Canada and
one, Teur, has played on the Queen's
university squad.:
Show Speed
Barkell was the individual star of
the game. The fast center scored all
of Michigan's points and played a clev-,
er game throughout.
Michigan's speedy players were on
the. offensive most of the time and
forced the play into their opponent's
territory. Only the remarkable work
of Brundige, D. & L. goal-tender, kept
the score down. The Canadian 'star1
blocked at least 15 .sure shots. The
rest of, the team played a good de-'
fensive game but could not hold the
puck on offense.'
Last Week of:'Sport
This will be the last week of hock-
ey. On Friday a tentative game has
been arranged with the Waterston
team and on Saturday the Rayls will
be seen here. The'Waterstons defeat-
ed the Rayls byi a score of 5 to 4 so
that the teams are evenly matched
and two good games are promised.
.The lineup was as follows:
Miehigan D. .
Barkell.......C......:....Marinelli
Kerr (capt.) ..L.W........ ...Smith
Anderson.......R.W........Peterson
MacDuff.......P.............Teur
Kahn .........C.P ,....McColom
Richards ........G..........Brundige
Substitutions: Cannon for Ander-
son, Didier for Cannon, Follis for
MacDuff, Hosking for Follis. Goals:
first period, Barkel in 8 minutes and
in 12 minutes; second period, Teur
in 13 .and Barkell in 14 minutes;
third period, Barkel in 9 and in 15
minutes.
PROF. CAREY TO TELL U. OF iL
OF EXPERIENCES IN CHINA
Prof. C. 0. Carey, of the engineering
college, who has spent a year and a
half at work on the grand canal in
China will lecture at 7 o'clock to-
night in Lane hall. He will tell of
his experiences and observations while
engaged, in work in China. All stu-
dents are invited to attend.
Women Sit in Democratic. Convention
Des Moines, Ia., Feb. 25.-Six wom-
en were chosen by Iowa Democrats as
delegates from various congressional
districts to the Democratic national
convention at the district caucauses
here today. Ten women were named
among the alternates.
Red Cross Doctors Secure Releases
Washington, Feb. 25. - Release of
Edward H. Charette, of Stockton, Cal-
ifornia, and Dr. 'Frederick L. Barnum
of Brooklyn, N. Y., members, of the
American Red Cross commission to'
Siberia who recently were captured
by the Bolsheveki, was reported to
Red Cross headquarters today from
Vladivostock

(By Associated Press)
New York, Feb. 25.-Henry Rus-
sell, of Detroit, vice-president and fed-
eral counsel of the Michigan Central
railroad, died of pneumonia tonight in
his suite at the Ritz-Carlton hotel.
He arrived in New York last Satur-
day intending to sail for Europe to-
day to bring home the body of his
son, IUeut. William, M. Russell, who
was killed in France. The body will
be taken to Detroit tomorrow,.and he
will be buried there on Saturday.
Mr. Russelr was born in Detroit
in 1852. He was graduated from the
University of Michigan and in 1877
joined the legal department of the
Michigan Central. He also was inter-
ested n a score of banks and corpor-
ations in Detroit.
./
M1.artians 'UnableĀ°
View Smoke
Screen On Earth
PROF. HUSSEY
Prof. William ,. Hussey, director of
the Astronomical observatory, in an4
interview with a Daily reporter yes-
terday, stated' that a mammoth smoke
screen released upon this earth could
not be detected by astronomers on the
planet Mars.
The use of the government surplus
of smoke making material left over
from the war in signalling Mars Wa
suggested a few days ago by James
J. Crenshaw, associate professor of
chenlistry at Bryn Mawr college, who
served in the chemical warfare sec-
tion of the American expeditionary
forces.
The government has enAough smoke
making material to, create a tremend-
ous screen or spot on the earth and
thtg material can be used for no other
purpose, says Professor Crenshaw. He
advocates covering 'an.area as big as
the state of Pennsylvania with either
black or white smoke.
"If theinteigence of the Martions
reaches ours," said Professor Cren-
shaw, "they would undoubtedly have
telescopes which would enable them.
to distinuish a large spot on the
earth's surface."
That this theory is vitally wrong,
according to Professor Hussey, is seen
front the fact that the image of the
earth as formed by a large telescope
on the planet Mars would have a diam'
eter twice as large as the head of a
pin.
"Moreover," said Professor Hussey,
"the fact that the earth is between
the planet Mars and the strong light
of the sun, would make the vision of
a smoke screen upon this earth out of
the question."
MANY OVERSEAS
MEN AT MEETING'
Election of officers, perfection of an
organization, and appointment of an
entertainment committee to lay plans.
for a smoker in the early part of
March were the principal things ac-
complished at a meeting of more than
200 overseas men at the Union.
Discussion of. prospects for the or-
ganization, was lively, and a desire
for an overseas society was shown by
the men present. It was decided that
it would be best to merge all local or-
ganizations of the marines, naval un-
Sits, and such into the one big soci-
ety.

ORicers chosen for the overseas men'
were: R. W. Johnson, '20, president;
William Sterling, '23, vice-president;
Maurice F. Cole, grad., secretary; and
Edward C. Marse,. '20. Sterling is
chairman of the entertainment com-
mittee.
Formation of a constitution is un-
der way, and plans call for a perman-
ent organization. Overseas men will
be given the chance to register each
day at the Union. A fee of 25 cents
will be charged members of the so-
ciety.
Wilson Asks Ratifleation of Suffrage
Washington, Feb. 25. - President
Wilson today appealed to the legisla-
ture of the state -of Oklahoma to ratify
the federal suffrage amendment.

Shditer

-y-----

Well Ple
Shown b

Intensive training for
It,",the 1920 Union opera
wit'h the announcement V
E. Mortimer Shuter, the
until the date of producti
from last Monday actio
for the cast would be he
a week and that song
would be given each after
Moore.
"I am exceptionally
with the large number
which we had this fall, si
abled the opera to obtain
ers than.ever before. W
lent music, which has 1
"George Did It" should <
p ss any previous prodt
Union."
Designs for the progi
opera must be submiti
Wednesday, it was anno
eight men,.who intend tc
the honor. Some of th
on the campus turned out
ing Tuesday,, and Union
pect to select an unusuE
sign for the program eoi
PROF.' MICOLE ADDRE
A. S. M. E.

APPOINTMENT I
COLBY TO OABIF
CAUSES SEN-SA
WILL FILL PLACE OF LA
OUSTED WEEK
AGO
FORMER ASSOCIATI
THEODORE ROOSE
Receii ed by Senate with Open
S'xrprise; Former Appoint
Given Fight -
'By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 25. -- P
Wilson again upset the expects
oTcial end political Washing
,d~ay by naming Baiu'oridge ' P
a New York attorney who left
publican party with Theodore
welt in 1912 as secretary of
the selection caused scarc
of a senation than the disno
Robert Lansing from the sta
folio two weeks ago"and was
with ia ch undisguised surpris+
senate where the Presidents
must he approved boforo 'i
can take 'the duties Lf th
but none othe leaders care
dict when confirmation mig
voted.
Once before the senate h:
called upon to act on a no:
of Mr. Colby and then consI
was voted although a stron
against him was led by the t
publican senators froj his sta
-was in 1917, when President
named him for membership
shipping board.
FIVE REHEARSALS A WEJ
TO WHIP OPERA INTO

s for a
ion the
h 2, at
ry mem-

1 dis-
That

aw of-I

Friday even-
of all members
and all visitors

Work on the canvassing of more
than 43,000 alumni of the U~iversity
to obtain information for the General'
catalogue of thie.University of Michi-
gan and for records of those who serv-
ed In the world war will be started
at once by the alumni catalogue of-
fice. This action was authorized by
the Board of Regents at its meeting
Friday.
The General catalogue is put out by
the University once every 10 years and
contains the nanes, classes, degfees,
and addresses, besides other general
information, of all th~e alumni. The
last catalogue was published' in 1911.
The catalogue office fias been at work
for sometime compiling a record of
the University's part in the var, and
the letters sent out will ask for a
complete military record from those
who took part in the war and have not
already turned their record in to- the.
office.
The catalogue office has a mailing
list of 43,783 alumni, while it has the
names of 6,230 more alumni whoe ad-
dresses are not known. It Is estimated
that this work of canvassing will cost
several thousand dollars. -
CORRECTION OF DATE FOR
SOPH PROM TICKET SALE
Due to an inadvertent error in yes-
terday's Daily, a statement appeared
to the. effect that the ticket sale for
the Sophomore Prom would- start to-
night at the Union. This is incor-
rect. The tickets will go on sale from
7:30 to 9:30 o'clock Monday night at
the desk in the Union lobby.

n that w9

ets Reply to Adriatic Note
a, Feb. 25.'- President
e to the entente premiers
tic situation was today be-
nsel of allied premiers in
eply to it is expected 'in
the question of thestime
ublic the contents of this
mmunications on the mat-
all, still is the subject of
correspondence between

rrogram
"What the Engineer May
on Graduation" was the si
talk given by Prof. Frank
at the A. S. M. E. smoker
held last night at the Un
of the main facts ,regardii
for the registrationHof arc]
gineers and surveyors wer(
by S. L. Hudd, '2E, F. C. T
and A. D. Althouse, '20E.
Joseph E. Bursley, who ht
turned to the University a:
sence of more than two y,
on -the. subject of "Salvage
States War Machinery" in
teresting manner.
The society has made :
series of illustrated lecti
technical lines, which will
practical basis and of consi
portance. Further announc
cerning them, will be mgde
Music was provided by
A. S. M. E. orchestra am
ments were served during

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