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February 25, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ITAI

'_

.

11

Sha-

L4
Piano, voice, and violin students
will be represented in the public stu-
dents' recital to be given at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Friese hall
of the University School of Music.
The following numbers will be on
the program:
Prelude and Fugue, C sharp major
.Bach
Etude, Op. 25, No. 12.........Chopin
Wilma Seedorf
Berceuse ....... ............ Grieg
Concert Mazurka ...... David Musin
Frank Panek
Who Knows .................... Ball
Cradle Song ............. MacFadyn
Dorothy Cozad
Romance from D mi'nor Concerto
................Wieniawski
Greta Forte...........
Etude, D flat'.................. Liszt
March Wind ............ MacDowell
Lucy Clark
My Task ................... Ashford
Lungi Dial Caro Bene ......... Secchi
Reba G. Klumpp
La Zingana ................... Bohm
Romance-................ Wilhelmj
Oswald Schaefer
TICKETS FOR ALL-SOPHOMORE
PARTY TO BE ON SALE TODAY
Final arrangements have been com-
pleted for the All-sophomore party to
be held from 2 30 to 5:30 o'clock Sat-
urday afternoon in the Union and the
ticket sale begins today. Tickets
which are priced at 50 cents bre ob-
tainable from members of the sopho-
more social committee of both the
engineering and literay colleges, and
may be secured at Graham's book
store, at each end of the diagonal
walk.
"Sandy" Wilson has promised his
all-star five man jazz orchestra. The
party has been planned along the lines
of the freshman dance which the
class of '22 gave last year. The num-
ber of tickets is limited to 225 and
are 'non-transferable.
Dr. A. M B.arrett to Speak in Detroit
Dr. Albert M. Barrett, director of
the State Psychopathic hospital in the
University, is scheduled to lecture to
members of the Twentieth Century'
club in Detroit Thursday afternoon.'
His subject will concern "The Mental
Aspect of Pf'oblems of Criminology."'

I 11LI I UI Lit 1ILII
Reading of the opera, assig
parts, and description of th
ters were the principal thing
pushed at the first rehears
cast for the Union opera,
last night at the Union by
mer Shuter, the director.
Practically every one of
the cast, who had been notif
rehearsal by phone, was -on l
second rehearsal will be W
night, when actio( of the ope
started, the members of
reading from their manuscr
'No chorus rehearsals wil'
this evening, due to the I
the list of eligibility to be
Better chorus dancing and
are promised this year, as
of all the music for the sho-
for the first time in the b
the year. Orchestra and ch<
often failed to work togethE
past shows, because insuffici
tunity had been afforded tb
practice together.

E X-MIL
GOVE

Two Premiums and G
quired for Re
ment

SCENE FROM "MIS' NELLY OF N'bRLEANS," IN WHICH MRS. tISKE APPEARS AT THE WHITNEY THE-
ATER, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY TWENTY-SIXTH.
. . .. . . . . ... . . ... . . . . . . .. .... .. ... . . . .... .. . .. .. . ... . . .

CLINIC OF DENTAL SCHOOL
TO INCREASE PERSONNEL SOON

The Stake

,::n. ..

of

The Dental clinic will be able in a
short time to handle all the cases
that need attention. -There are at the
present time about 30 seniors working
full timne in the clinic and 61 juniors
spending, part time in the big work
roon. When these juniors are able to
put in full time; the authorities believe
that all eases can be handled with

-- Durirng the time between the Christ-
' mas vacation and end of the semes-
ter, only about one case in five re-
ceived attention. This was due to the
lack of men eligible for work.
} Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

THE WHITNEY
In the titular role of Mrs. Fiske's
'"Mis' Nelly of N'Orleans," cominj to-
morrow evening to the Whitney, the
brilliant American comedienne has the
best opportunities presented in her
stage career to bring out fine shad-
ing of comiody. As she laughingly ad-
mits, "It is disgracefully like myself
and is better fitted to me than any-
thing I have every played before."
The rest of the cast is the original
ope which appeared in New York City
and includes popular players such as
Hamilton Revelle, Strachan Young,
Joseph Greene, Gertrude Chase, Dor-
othy Day, Eva Benton, Ezra Walch,
and Flavia Olmstead.
"Chin Chin," just as tuneful and
fantastic as it was in New York, is
coming Saturday evening to the Whit-

ney.

r'

'.

j

The Screen

OMORROW
ktird

THE MAJESTIC

,4

;.

)hi

Fur smuggling is the latest branch
of that profession, always popular
with playwrights,, to be introduced in
the movies and it is an indispensible
part of the plot in "A Daughter of
the Wolf," Lila Lee's latest picture
which will be shown today and to-
morrow at the Majestic.
Miss Lee is presented in the role of
the daughter of Wolf Ainsworth who
as the smugglers' leader. As the iden-
tity of the heroine of "A Daughter of
'the Wolf" would indicate, adventure
,and romance hold sway in this- screen
drama.

b

SENATE ATION ASKEDi
ON KREA. SITUATION.
ANN ARBOR CITIZENS TO URGE
PRESIDENT TO STOP JAP
ATROCITIES
Speakihg in connection with the re-
cent atrocities committed by the .Tap-
anese in Korea, Prof. Homer B. Hul-
bert and Dr. A. S. Beak, Sunday even-
ing in the Presbyterian church, made
an urgent appeal for action obn the
part of the Aerlcan people td prevet
further massacres of .Koreans. The
following resolutions, expressing the
convictions of the 660 citiens of Ann
Arbor who attended the meeting ar
as follows:
Whereas, During the forty centuries
preceding 1910, Korea was an Inde-
pendent nation;
Whereas, The United States of
America,' recognized her independence
and made a treaty, agreeing to exert
her good offices if other powers dealt
unjustly with Korea; .
Whereas, From the deliberations of
the United States Senate, it is perfect-
ly apparent that Korea was taken by
Japan In 1910 by fraud;
Whereas, Japan has since 1practiced
unjust and inhuman methods i,; her
dealings with the Korean people, es-
pecially with the Korean Christians;
Whereas, On the'first day of March,
1919, the entire Korean population
unanimously declared their independ-
ence from the Japanese'rule, and or-
ganized a representative form of gov-
ernment, and promulgated a ne condi-
tion, making her a self-governing,
democratic, Christian nation;'
Whereas, The Japanese government
has been employing the most bar-
barous methods in suppressing the
Korean people in their aspirations to
be free and independent; therefore,
be it
Resolved, By the people of Ann Ar-
bor, assembled in the Presbyterian
church, that we do solemnly protest
against conditions created by Japan
and existing in Korea. as being anti-
Christian, autocratic, cruelly oppres-
sive to the Korean people; and be it
further
Resolved, That we ask the Govern-
-mbnt of the United States to take such
measures as will secure the fulfill-
ment of our solemn treaty obligations
entered into between the United States
and Korea in May, 1882, wherein this
country declared that "there shall be
perpetual peace and friendship" be-
tween the said governments, and that
the United States would exert its goo
offices if other Powers dealt unjustly
with Korea; and be it further
Resolved, That a copy of thee reso-
lutions be transmnitted to the Presi-
dent of the United States, the members
of the Cabinet, the members of the
United States Senate and House of
Representatives, and also be published
in the newspapers of Ann Arbor.
Signed
- John M4. Wells,
President of the Religious
Federation of Ann Arbor.
Chas. T. Webb,
Secretary of the Religious
Federation of Ann Arbor.
-MXULLISON'S SADDLE LIVERY
Call 87 for horses and cutters or

WHITNEYATHEATRE
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26

W
f1 1 I - wmwpp
Messes
rCobaft&Varn's

Ex-service men who hav
their insurance to l4pse ma
instate it any 'time befor
according to a recent ann
of the bureau of war risk
Regardless of how long
er service man may have
charged, his insurance may
stated on the following cot
(1) Two monthly- premit
amount of insurance to be
.must accompany the appli
(2) The applicant must
good health as at the da
charge, or at the expirati
grace period, whichever is
date, and so state in the api
This is the latest provis
bureau of war risk insurar
former service men keep t
ance, and is ,much broadeni
ings on the payment
ance, compensation, and th
ment of the beneficiary gr

il

y.-

"!

1,4 :

>'

.

I
- . :,.

in a Comedy of
joonshine, Madness and Makcem
Is WELLYoFIIORLE

Patronize our Adv

i

0

bLAURENCE E
Dire-ction I4ARRISON GREY F

r

.I

ms's .

THE ARCADE

WILL WANT TO SEE-JACK
AS CHAD IN THIS HUMAN
)RES
T DRY AND DRY,"

Jack Pickford secretly cherished a
hope years ago that he would, at
pne "time or another,, appear in a
dranatization of John Fox's popular
"Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come,"
and he has at last realized his hope.
'The Little Shepherd of Kingdom
Come" is Jack Pickford's first Gold-
wyn starring vehicle and will be
shown today and tomorrow at the Ar-
cade.
Although Jack Pickford's new role
of a mountain boy is a change from
his usual interpretations of the parts'
of young society men, the change has
had highly gratifying results. Sup-
porting Mr. Pickford are Pauline
Stark, Edythe Chapman, and others.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION BILI
INTRODUCED BY SEN. CAPPER
Washington, Feb. 24. - Physical
education for children under 18 years
of age is proposed in a bill introduced'
yesterday by Senator Capper, Repub-
lican, Kansas. *
The measure would appropriate
$10,000,000 for the work which would
be carried out through the bureau of
education of the department of labor.
It is the opinion of Senator Capper
that physical education would give the
country most of the practical bene-
fits argued for military training with-
out the undesirable effects of compul-
sory training in the later. The bill
was referred to the education commit-
tee.

SEATS NOW SELLING
LOWER FLOOR $2.50
BALCONY $1.00-$1.50-$2.00
WHITNEY TH EATR ESE
ONE N6 T ONLY
RETURN ENGAGEMENT
NEW SCENERY NEW COSTU
BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER
SIXTH SEASON
Charles Dillingham's Greatest of Musical Comedies
ONLY COMPANY PRESENTING

With WAL

WILLS and ROY

LL '

ORIGINAL' NEW YORK GLOBE THEATRE PRODUCTION

at

CHESTRA EVENINGS
Children 10 cents
3:30, 7:00 and 8:30
nd SATURDAY
1 "Sooner or Later"
RS ON THE ARCADE CALENDAR IN

Two years in. . Y. City

.WITH ITS WEALTH OF NOVEL EFFECTS AND WONDERF
SCENES, INCLUDING THE FLIGHT OF THE PAGODA A
AIRSHIP
Caravans of Pretty Girls-Company of 70-Tingling-Jingling Nun
- And the Famous -
TOM BROWN'S CLOWN SAXOPHONE BAND

Two years in N. Y.

Prices: 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00
MAIL

Sale

teams on double cutters.

-Also, in II

pleasant weather, 'fr saddlers.-Adv.

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