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February 25, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-25

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DAY AND N1
SEBV

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1920. PRICE

0

11 ll
VETO
0o BILL

UITY ARE ASIDE
ISLATION'S

i

RILL TEST
TUTIONALITY
ectIons Are 'Unfair to
and Burden to
overnmen
aciated Press)
aeb. 24.-Railroad la-
ight to ask President
he railroad reorgani-
memorial to be sub-
late tomorrow the
f the 2,000,000 union
luest the president to
iature from the meas-
an present a brief of
4y it sh'ould not have
al.
to Finish
the president's inten-
>rney General Palmer
ltty of the reorganiza-
d not deter the union
ir determined course
r claims of inequity
lation.were explained
L any question of the
bill and they, there-!
carry the opposition
finisah

DETROITERS HEAR BRUMM
Addresses Fathers' and Sons' Banquet
on Personal Responsibilities
Speaking at a fathers' and sons'
banquet held last night in the Wood-
ward Avenue Presbyterian church of
Detroit, Prof. John R. Brumm of the;
Journalism department gave an ad-
dress on the responsibility of the fa-
ther to the son;.
Professor Brumm described the
different types of fathers, including
what he called a "Santa Claus fa-
ther," who gave his children every-
thing they desired without thought -of,
the consequences. He ended his ad-
dress with a description of the ideal
father, "the one who is a real pal to
his boy."'
During the course of his speech,
Professor Brumm told how the aver-
age young man of today has no real
objective in life and 'how he was cod'-
tent to drift along without thinking
of the future. Professor Brumm stat-
ed that 80 per cent of the students in"
most universities came there without
any serious motives for their life
work.
Dr. M. C. Pearson, secretary of the
Detroit council of churches, was an-
other eminent speaker on the pro-
gram. He made an urgent appeal to'
the fathers and sons to stand 'by the
church and to support it in every
possible way.
Will Make Arrests Despite Lack of
Legal Sanction; Joined by
State Troops-
LEADERS EXPECT TO FIND NO
RESISTANCE AT IRON RIVER{

ion program.
ped definitely'
ed, is to test'
e law. Labor1
nittedly will
ailed by the
contemplates!
ection, which!
r to the tax
the govern-1
rision on the
r condemna-
ington
ison, consid- j

i

Chantion, Feb. 24.-Denied warrants
for the arrest of officials of Iron
county, Michigan, whom he charges.

.troversy, submitted by
ind Director General
largely per'unctory at
ling. Many of the del-
e of the general chair-
ht to leave Washing

Prom Tickets
On Monda
e the Soph prom strictly a
3 affair, the sale of tickets
11 be held Thursday night;
imited only to sophomores.
ag will be severely adhered
ling to Douglas Dow, '22E,
of the prom committee.
ket sale will begin next
vening at the desk in the
he Union. The number of
is -been limited to 200 and
be reserved. Appearance in
the Union Thuresday even-
cessary to insure getting
rhich are non-transferable.
been decided that although
will be a formal affair, the
dress for the men is op-
ween tuxedos and full dress
Enos, two saxaphones, in-
Eans" Sherman and "Jake"
two banjos, two violins, a
and traps comprise the well
orchestra of 10 pieces which
secured .-from "Sandv" Wil-
non Band Elects Officers
al business meeting was held
an band practice Tuesday
n University hall. Eugene
s elected business manager
Mefford was chosen as sec-
asurer of the band.
Wilson was unable to at-
ractice but will be in charge
next rehearsal. Professor
the rhetoric department
a short talk to the members.

wvth conspiracy to obstruct the pro-
hibition law Major A. V. Dalrymple,j
with a force of 35 men passed through
Champion tonight enroute to Iron
River, with the avowed intention of
making the arrests withoutwarrants
and recovering 11 barrels of wine tak-
en from federal officials last week.
Joined by State 'roops'
At Negaunee, Michigan, Lieut. A.
A. Downing, commanding the Michi-
gan State constabulary in the upper:
1peninsula with a half troop of his men
joined Major Dalrymple and his par-
ty of 16 federal officers. Five addi-
tional state troops at Castian, Michi-
gan, have orders to proceed to Iron
River tonight to join the party in the
morning.
No Resistance Expected)
The men whose arrest " Major
Dalrymple 'seeks are Martin McDon-
ough, state attorney of Iron county,
five deputy sheriffs, the chief and cap-
tain of police of, Iron River village
and three citizens.
Neither Major Dalrymple nor Lieu-
tenant Downing anticipated any re-
sistance at Iron River. The state
troops left their rifles in barracks and
like the federal agents carried only
side arms.
Regret "Misunderstanding'
Martin S. McDonough, state attor-:
ney for Iron River, today announced
that he had received a telegram from
Attorney General Palmer, regretting
that a "misunderstanding had arisen"
over the enforcement of the prohibi-
tion laws and expressing the hope
that the difficulty would be straight-
ened out. Mr. McDononugh was ad-
vised by the attorney general to get
in touch with District Attrney Walker
at Grand Rapids, in an effort to settle
the matter.
Former Naval Men Organize Club
Over-seas club, composed of Uni-
versity men who have served on for-
eign soil or with the NavyIn foreign,
waters, was formed last night at the
Union. The officers elected are Roy
Johnson, '20, president, William Sterl-
ing, '22, vice-president, Maurice F.
Cole, grad., secretary, and Edward C.
Masse, '20, treasurer.
The purpose of the club is the en-
tertainment of the members and plans
for a smoker are already bein; made.
All men who desire to become mem-
bers are requested to register at the

R, 0, T, C, CAMPS
Large ajority of Michigan Unit to
Go in Training This
Summer
WAR DEPARTMENT ESTIATES
ENROLLMENT AT 10,000
"Although no definite figures will be
available, of course, until just before
the dates set for the R. 0. T. C. sum-
mer camps, it seems probable now that
there will be a large attendance of
mn from the R. 0. T. C. units here,"
stated Captain Arthur of the Uni-
versity R. 0. T. C. unit. "Out of the
first 19 . men questioned regarding
their intentions in the matter, 15 sig-
nified their expectation of attending
one of the camps this summer.
"There will be two of these camps,
one for the coast artillery at Fort
Monroe, Va.,. from June 17 to July 28,
an done for the signal corps at Camp
Vail, N. J., fom June 24 to Aug. 4."
Expect 10,000 to Aend
The war department has-estimated
total attendance at these summer
camps at 10,000 men from all R. 0.
T. C. units throughout the - country.
Captain Arthur stated that to quali-
fy for a commission a man should at-
tend two of these camps during his
R. 0. T. C. course. "If more than 10,-
00 men apply for attendance during
the coming summer," he said; "the
number to go from the junior units
will be restricted, giving preference
to the senior units."
Present enrollment in the R. 0. T.
C. in the University here now num-
bers more than 150, This is with rep-
resentation, since the beginning of the
second semester, fro'hi'the engineering
ar-d literary colleges and the law
school. "Enrollment for the present
semester will not continue beyond the
end of this month," Captain Arthur
states,' "except in accordance with
University practice In cases of delayed
registration."
Instructors Arrive
Material for the coast artillery is be-
ing received, which up to the present
has consisted chiefly of material per-
taining to the fire drill. The person-
nel of the department has also been
increased by the arrival of Sergts.
Benjamin Thomas and Joe Rodak and
Sergt. Delbert C. Smith. Sergeant
Thomas wil have charge of all office
work, Sergeant Rodak will take over
the demonstrating of artillery mate-
rial and Sargeant Smith will be as-
sistant in charge of motor transporta-
tion.
In addition to the progress in the
R. 0. T. C. school work, satisfactory
progress Is also being made in- the
social organization of the students in
theR.0O. T.C.
U. S. HEALTH SERVICE OFFERS
TREATMENT TO EX-SOLDIERS
Bill Provides That Compensation Also
Be Given to Disabled Dough
boys
As a result of recent government
legislation, the United States public
health service at Washington, D. C., is
-empowered to offer free medical aid
and treatment, and compensation if
merited, to all discharged sick, or dis-
abled soldiers.
Unfortunately, many ex-service men
appear to be ignorant of the provis-

E ons of this bill, and are either neg-"
lecting their injuries entirely, or are,
paying for their own artificial limbs
and other medical attention.
Hospitals have been establsihed at
convenient places throughout the-Un-
ited-States, where physical examina-
tions and suitable treatment are pro-;
vided. The government is desirous
of aiding these men, and' urges that,
they write for information to# the Un-
ited State public health service,
Washington, D. C.
EXPEDITION TO COLUMBIA
TO BE MADE THIS YEAR
An expedition to Columbia, follow-;
ing its authorization by the Board of
Regents at their last meeting, will be"
made thiq year under the supervision
of Prof. Alexander R. Ruthven, di-
rector of the zoology museum for the
purpose of securing specimens, as
soon as the plans can be worked out.
The expenses of the party have been
provided for by a gift.

DECISION IS REACHED
DISCUSSION WIT
CO] IITTEE.

.HIGHWAYNIES HERE
Representatives Addressed By Pres.
Hutchins at First Meeting
The conference of Michigan road
builders who are meeting here this
week, opened Monday afternoon with
an address by Pres. Harry B. Hutch-
ins.
Because of the heavy snows of Sun-
day night it -has been impossible for
a number of the delegates to appear.
Thus far 110 representatives have ar-
rived.
At the informal dinner given at the
Michigan Union last night Charles T.
Bennett gave an illustrated lecture on
the efficient methods of snow remov-
al. Mr. Bennett is state highway com-
missioner of Connecticut and, accord-
ing to Prof. A. H. Blanchard, is one
of the few highway commissioners
who has remained in office inn spite
of the political situations which have
arisen.
Thenmeetings today will be held at
9 and 1 o'clock in room 348 of the
'Engineering building. Prof. A. H.
Blanchard will give an address this
afternoon on the subject, "The Rela-
tion of Highway Transport Surveys
to the Economic Design of Highways."
UiVERL T RAI N IN0
CUT PROM ARMY SILL

(Special to The Daily)
Washington, Feb. 24. - Universal
military training will be omitted from
the house army reorganization bill
and be the subject of separate legis-
lation at the next session of congress,
beginning in December. This was
agreed on tonight by Republican lead-
ers and Chairman Kahn of the house
military committee, after two days' of"
informal conferences.
The agreement is looked upon as
eliminating any possibility of Re-
publican action in the house which.
might be interpreted as a stand on
universal training in the coming
presidential campaign, and will leave
the parties attitude as possible sub-
ject for consideration in framing a
platform at the national convention.
1SEW FELLOWSHIP OFFERED
BY CLEVELAND FIRM
The Ric-Wil company, of Cleveland,
Ohio, builders of underground' heating
equipment, have offered a fellowship
for the purpose of obtaining informa-
tion concerning the loss of heat by
underground pipes.
Three years ago, W. A. Warrick, as-
sistant In- the mechanical laboratory,
made extensive tests concerning heat
absorption by the ground. The results'
as obtained by his experiments were
later used as a basis for a master's
degree thesis. As yet this fellowship.
has not been assigned, but the re-
search, when commenced, will con-
sist of experiments to determine. the
heat loss of a pipe at different depths
in the ground, with and without insu-
letion, and possibly with soils of dif-
ferent composition.
3. E.'LAB ORDERS FIVE AtO
ENGIlNES FROM GOVERNMENT
A telegram was dispatched yester-.
day morning ordering five aeroplane
engines from the government for ex-
perimental use in the mechanical en-
gineering laboratory.
These engines are rebuht motors
which are consdered too old to be
used with safety for flying. The Nome.
a rotary type, six cylinedr Mercedes,
eight cylindered Sturtevant, Hal Scott,
and a Lawrence are the engines which
have been ordered.
ADELPHI TO DISCUSS CITY
MANAGER PLANIN DEIBATE
Speeches on topics of national and
international interest were discussed
at the meeting of the Adelphi house
of representatives last night in Uni-
versity hall. The subject for debate,
at the next meeting of the' club will
be: "Resolved, That the city manager
plan of government be adopted for all
cities exceeding 100,00 in population."
Visitors will, be permitted to partici-
pate in the discussion of the bill.

AFTER

PRESERJVATIONOF INDEPENBENCE
FRIEDOM OF ACTION ESSENTU

THINKS UNION SPLENDID IDEA;
CALLS BUILDING FINEST
. HE HAS- SEENI
SAYS COLLEGE VOTE ON
PACT REPREENTATI VE
Expresses Self as Strongly Favoring
Strict Regulation of immi-
gration
"Nothing that I have seen in my ex-
perience with colleges compares with
the Michigan Union in size or mag-
nificance, in t e line ,of a university
men's club," said Hon. George Suth-
erland, '83L, yesterday.
. Mr. Sutherland expressed himself
as without words to show his admira-
tion for the 'Union and for .what it
stands for. He said, "The idea is
superb, the place for the men to get-
togther for good clean amusement and
in such a building is wonderful; I
cannot express my appreciation 'of
such an institution. I believe that it
'should do an inestimable amount of
good in providing a place in which
the men can congregate, with good as-
sociations, with the best of' facilities
for enjoying themselves and at the
same time in an -atmosphere of the
best kind possible.".
Notes Changes
Mr. Sutherland, remarked how the
Universtiy had changed since he was
here in the early eighties. "When I
was here," the said, "there were about
1,500 students. Now I find that it has
more than 8,000 students and is at
the present time, undoubtedly, one of
the greatest universities in the world.
"There has always been a peculiar
,fact about Michigan in comparison to
"bther universities, that of the purpose
of its students. There are now and
there have been as long as I can re-
member, a greater percentage of men
and women in the University of Mich-
igan who have come here forthe pur-
pose of getting all that is possible
out of their college !career than in
any other university in the country."
Comments on Legue
Asked his opinion on the recent na-
tional college vote on the 'league of
nations, Mr. Sutherland said, "Two-
thirds of the votes cast were against
unqualified ratification of the treaty.
This was true all through the coun-
try and expresses the gradually grow-
ing sentiment, as the country under-
,stands better the provisions of the
treaty, that it is not the thing to have
as it stands now.
"Personally I do not like it at all.
,I believe that it would grow on us un-
til in the end it would threaten our
national safety. It is a well known'
fact that men, when they get across
the water, thousands of miles from
home will be affected by the men
around them, and will in a measure
absorb the European point of view.
As a result they become more inter-
ested in the settlement of the pro-
blems before them than in the welfare
of theor own nation. The American
.ls a straight-thinking' animal and
when he comes in contact with the
European he is out of his element.
The age old cunning and craft and
,ntriguing will always be too much
for Americans.
Says Attend to Own Affairs
"We dominate this hemisphere. Let
Europe continue its brawls and in-
,triguing and let America attend to its
own affairs not mixing into affairs
where we annot possibly benefit and
where we m aylay ourselves open to
immeasurable harm. America has al-
ways been known to do the right thing
when it became evident what was to
be done, but 11 cannot become recon-
ciled to a treaty binding the future

generations to a policy of European
meddling and interference. Let the
generations of the future decide their
own problems instead of us trying
to settle their destiny for them. They
will handle their difficulties as we
have handled ours."
Mr. Sutherland. epressed himself
as strongly in favor of a restricted'
foreign immigration with two prin-
cipal regulations.
Favors Literary Test
"First," he said, "I believe in the
literary test. It is not perfect but
J believe it is as nearly perfect as
. ' (Continued to Page Six)

DECLARES ART. X OF LI
MIGHT LEAD T ENTAN
ING ALLIANCES
GENEROSITY AND GI
A WORLD COMBINA
Paet Seeks to ake Poltica
Permanent; Intriglie Won'
Make This Impossible
"I, for one, firmly belipve t
shall not only serve our own
ests best, but 'that we shall a
the welfare of the world mosi
doing so we shall preserve uni
ed the attitude of complete fi
and independence of action
hitherto maintained, leaving nu
and succeeding generations t
charge the duty and responsibi
their wisdom may from time
direct, unhampered by any cot
which would result from the
weaving of our destiny with I
the old world," said Hon.
Sutherland, '83L, in Hill audi
yesterday, speaking of the attit
believed proper for this country
gard to the League of Nations.
Mr. Sutherland brought .ou
salient facts in his address e
"The Supreme Allegiance" yes
The first was, that patriotism
country should come, above all
fuil "Internationalism" bel ef
loyalties that, are being spoke
often in regard to the necessl
League of Nations, and the
was, that article X of the pr
League of Nations contained
sions that have possibilities of
entanglingalliances About w1
United States may 4ell cnsid
before entering into a. act
binds it to such agreemients.
Internationalism Dangeroi
Of the first, he said, "No m
remain loyal to his own count
be willing to_ imperil her insti
and organic existenge for son
or fancied obligation to serve
kind' in general. Any philosophy
teach'es us ,td sacrifice these ir
to serve the world is a shame
fraud. Not only can the wor
I be served in any such way, but
tempt it will be to sow the see
divided allegiance which will
tably ripen into national desti
"To admit such a spirit of i
tionalism as this into the body
nation would entail consequenc
filar to those which folldw the d
ment of that mysterius thing
'multiple personality' in the b
an individual-a tangle of utt
wilderment and confusion. I
with every atom of my intellig
doctrine so filled with menace. I
anxious as anyone for the wel
of the world, but if if am as
promote the well-being of the
at the risk of undermining th
dations tp the Republic, every
ment of reverence and attachm

fidelity to American
ests bids me stand
even at the cost of
w orsld."

ideals a
for the
hardshi

Comments on Article'X
"Of the second point, after qu
article X he said, "The obligati
will be seen, is not merely to
spect-which requires us to re
only our own predatory desire
operations-but it is to preservi
property of our neighbors, whii
quires us to restrain the pred
operations of others, a far dil
and a far more onerous oblig
since the former involves. no
more serious than the exercise
fair degree of self restraint, whi
latter may call,'for the exercise
very high degree'of expensive an
agreeable and more or less trag
firmative action.
(Continued to Page Six)

CHIMES WANTS TI
Sophomore3 wishing
out for the Chimes
staff may apply at th
office in the Press bui
tween 1 and 2 o'clock

l

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