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February 18, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

hAIL UUUILII-
0 MEETING HERE

at

WILL HAVE CONFERENCE SHORT-
LY AFTER COMMENCE-
MENT

Vid a's

'
''

service1

nt to your soci
Cegular M
35c and4

I

The society for the promotion of'
Enginering Education has abcepted
food and the invitation offered 'by President
Harry B. Hutchins and the Board of
will lend Regents, to hold their next annual
meeting at Ann Arbor.
The meeting, which will take place
l chat. shortly after commencement, will
bring together the deans and depart-.
[eals mental heads of all important engin-{
eering colleges in this country.
At the last meeting, held in Balti-
more, about 250 were in attendance.
10C This year, due to in'creased interest
and the fact that the meeting is being
held in the middle west, a large num-
ber of representatives are expected,
, according to Prof. J. R. Nelson, of
the English department, who is a
L S ) member of the executive council of
the society.
T'he meeting, Professor Nelson be-
lieves, will hold added interest this
IAM year because of the nation-wide move-
pnent to .broaden the curriculum of
xlf from engineering colleges. ,
CLASS PARTIES
Will be reinstated at the Packard
every Tuesday and Thursday eve., 8
to 10. Chaperones will be present to
give introductions and see that proper
IIllillllllll dancing is done. The ban will be put
on cheek dancing and other improper
Detroit positions. Ladies 25c, Gents 35c.
RERE" =Couples 60c.-Adv.
HF11111lDlll l -' Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

DEAN COOLEY DENIES
RESIGNATION RUMOR
No truth in the rumor. Will
be eligible to retire under the
Carnegie Foundation this year,
but have done nothing to bring
it about and- do not intend to,
for the present. There is too
much going on in the Univer-
sity, particularly, in the college
of engineering, in which I wish
to have a hand to think of let-
ting go just now.
M. E. COOLEY.
TIhe Stage
THE WHITNEY
"On the Hiring Line," starring May
Irwin Saturday evening at the Whit-
ney, has been declared to be a "rol-
licking comedy that shoots its shaft
of wit through the back door of every
home." The book is the joint work
of Harvey J. O'Higgins and Harriet
Ford. George C. Tyler directs the play
while Miss Irwin is supported by such
favorites as George Howell, Sidney
Toler, Minna Gombell, Nyda Westman,
George and Howard Lindsay, and
Robert Hudson.
The Whitney booking for next week
include F. Ray Comstock and Morris
Gest's "Experience" to be presented
Tuesday and "Mis' Nelly of N'Orleans"
with Mrs. Fisk, to appear Thursday
night.

- ~ ~~ S
Overseas men will hold a get-to-
gether at 7:15 o'clock Tuesday night
at the Union in response to a demand
for such an assembly. Until organiza-
tion is perfected and a chairman elect-
ed, Carl Hogan, '20E, president of the
Union,.will preside.
Plans will be laid at this gathering
for future meetings and entertain-
ments of the overseas 'men... Many of
the returned soldiers have expressed
the desire to Union officials that a get-
together should be given in order that
the men may become acquainted and
exchange experiences.
Supporters ofthe meeting expect a
large attendance at the first meeting,
,s they believe there are more than
500 overseas men in the University.
Union officials expect to aid the men
in every possible manner. In case
a smoker is desired the main floor
reading room will be opened, and the
men may give a dance. The Union

U

1.11VI.. iUl Ia I II U 1 IW L11
BET-TOGETHER MEETING

RALPH JOHNSON, '20L, DIES
IN HOSPITAL OF INFLUE.
Ralph L, Johnson, '20L, died Ni
day night in the University hosl
of blood poisoning which set in
lowing influenza. He had been ill
three weeks.
Mr. Johnson took his A. B. degre
Oberlin College, after which he tat
mathematics in the high school
Akron, Ohio. On leaving Akrop he
came superintendent of schools
Hillsdale, Michigan, which positiol
left to take up the study of lave
Michigan. He is survived by his v
Mrs. Olive Johnson, '21L, who is
a graduate of Oberlin college, ar
daughter, Betty.
The funeral will be held from
Johnson's boyhood home, in Lon
Ohio.

Today and TI
ALFRED DUNH
A. Starr Best

WHITNEY THEATRE
THURS. FEB. 26

512 E. WILL
(Block and a ha

1,

The Screen

present
n
oonshine Madne
Il-

,,

yl

a Comedy of
SS and Wake-Believe

THE MAJESTIC

f and TOMORROW
y Allison

0 ,

- in-
Wal--Offs
n the Oliver Morosco Stage Success
By Frederic and Fanny Hatton

_

S.

Rugged mountains and deep can-
yons form the background for the
scenes in "Told in the Hills," which
will be shown today and tomorrow at
the Majestic, featuring Robert War-
wick.
It is a story of Montana in the '80's
and is woven about a man who be-
comes known as "Genesee Jack," pro-
spector.. The tale is set in motion
when "Genesee" and his younger
brother promise their mother that they
will shield her ward, Ann Belleau.
The younger brother is untrue to his
trust and to save Ann's good name
"Genesee" marries her although he
does not love her. Then he goes to the
frontier where his only friends are
Indians, and lives apart from civiliza-
tion. Ann Little plays opposite War-
wick 'in "Told in the Hills."
THE ARCADE
May Allison ;in "The Walk-Offs," a
picturization of Frederic : and Fanny
Hatton's stage comedy of the same ti-
tle, will be shown today and tomor-
Fow at the Arcade. Appearing as
Kathlden Rutherford, a young society
woman, Miss Allison's hand is sought
by -a wealthy bounder, and a young
Kentucky mine owner. She under-
stands the former but does not love
him; her acquaintance with the other
ripens into a romance that is accom-
panied by excitement and uncertainty.
An imposing court scene, with its
action carried through in a satirical
vein is one of the amusing features
that comes early in the picture.
ELIGIBILITY COMMITTEE GETS
UNION OPERA TRY-OUT LISTS
Property to Amount of $12,000,Lostn
When Old Union Burns on
Feb. 1
Names of candidates for the Union
opera have been submitted to the elig-
ibility committee, and 'will probably
be returned by the end of the week, in
which case E. Mortimer Shuter will
commence rehearsals the first of next
week.
Less than two months is left before
the show will be produced in Ann Ar-
bor. Scenery has been ordered and'is
under construction, 'costumes are e-
ing made, the book is entirely com-
pleted, and all of the music for the
opera is in.
About a $12,000 loss was incurred by
the Union, all of v- ich was covered
by insurance, when a fire destroyed
the old Union building, Sunday, Feb.
1,. The principal damage was to the
old club, house and to opera scenery,
wheih was stored in the basement.
The entire building, including the
dance hall, will probably be ,torn
down, it was stated.

May

Iw in

In the latest satirical comedy, direct
Criterion Theater, N. Y.

from the

SEATS NOW BY
ENVELOPE INCLUI
LOWER FL
BALCONY

ON THE HIRING- LINE
By Harvey T. O'Higgins and Harriet Ford
(Direction of George C. Taylor)
COMPANY OF DISTINCTIVE MERIT

r/
WHITNEY THEAT
SATURDAY NIGHT FEB
AMERICA'S GREATEST COMEDIENN

George Homee
George Lindsey
i-ydia Westman;

Aobert Hudson
Minna Gombell *
Homer Lindsey
Lillian 'Weslman

' -LIGON THE WALK OFS'

Prices 75c to $2.00-Mail Orders N
W,,HI..'TNEY T.HEATRI
Tuesday, Feb. 24
F. RAY COMSTOCK and MORRIS GEST
Will Present
The Most Wonderful Play in America
By George V. Hobart
BIGGER AND BETTER THIS YEAR
THAN EVER BEFORE,
ENDORSED BY THE CLERGY NOW IN ITS SIXTH YEA
OF THE ENTIRE COUNTRY AS CONTINUOUS AND MA
A MORAL LESSON FOR YOUTH OUS SUCCESS
ELABORATE NEW SCENIC EFFECTS
AND COMPLETE NEW COSTUME PRODUCTION
NOTABLE CAST OF DISTINGUISHED PLAY
Lower Floor $2.00, Balcony $1.00.$1.50, Gallery 75c; War Tax
MAIL ORDERS NOW

:uld sew and dust
another world of
d never raised her
ed he would make

He was a Kentuckian and a "Cave Man."
He placed bets on women as he would on a
thoroughbred, but May Allison, as the beauti-:
ful young society woman, taught him a lesson.

I take a walk with "The Walk" .- Offs"
imedy "SOME SRIMMIERS" and Weekly
ws Begin at 2:00, 3:30, 7:00 and 8:30

Get your Furniture and -Rugs,
Koch and Henne.-AdY-.

at'

GER THAN DEATH"

Multiplex Hammond Typewriters,
new and second hand. Will accept
other makes in trade. Martin R.
Webb, 1214 Willard, Phone 1595-R.
Call between 6 and 7 P. M.-Adv.

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