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February 18, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-18

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* ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1920.

,.
. _ .. .;

Of ENGINEERING CURRICULA CONTEMPLATED

Cooley Explains New Five Year
Course Planned by Faculty
)bable revision of the course of
es for Engineers, making an elec-
course of five years, after which
Master's degree would be con-;
1, is one of the important chang-
ntemplated in the discussion now
g place among the Engineering
ty.
Cooley Explains
regard to this revision of curri-
in the Engineering college, Dean
mer E. Cooley explained the pres-
tatus of the discussion, as fol-

"The opinion seems to be very gen-
eral both in the Engineering colleges:
of the country and the different na-
of tional societies that the present cours-
on es in engineering are too specific;
,ri' that the graduates, while splendidly
nal trained to do particular things, are not
°v- well enough trained to occupy the
ral higher positions of general responsi-
can bility.
"The situation may be likened to
ar- that of a military organization where'
of the officer has specific duties up to
ex- and including the rank of captain. He
by reaches what is called his majority
ny with the rank of major; from that
time on he is a general or field offi-
cer. What the engineering profes-
nt- sion needs is -more general and field
een
ch-
ar DUCAT IUI9flWESRE
ar-
ny
ard APPRO TED OF BY WOMEN

ONMEND PASSAGE OF BIL-
LION DOLLAR APPROPRI-
ATION

in- (By Associated Press)
ion Chicago, Feb. f7. - The national
in league of-women voters today*adpoted
we resolutions recommending the pass-
vill gge of pending legislation which pro-
rm vides for the expenditure of $1,000,-
,00,000 for education, the money is to
be'divided among the states.
up- Bills endorsed are the Smith-Tow-
ith ,ner. bill, the Kenyon bill and House
ad- bill and naturalization.
ee- The women of the league also ask-
be ed for an educational qualification for
ill ithe vote in- all states after all that
.qualified had had ample opportunity
to make good in lack of training. Com-
pulsory education, nine months of the
year for all persons between the ages
of 6 and 16 is recommended.
Y Two provisions for the education of
ct new comers and all others, who have
Ia- not been absorbed, into American cit-
th- izenship by education and training

officers. It is this need that the long-
er and broader course intends to sup-
ply. w
Committee Appo ted
"A committee was app inted in the
early winter of 1918-1919 to consider
conditions in the College of Engineer-
ing and to make recommendations con-
cerning any changes that might be
thought desirable. The report of this
committee was submitted Nov. 24,'
1919. The report is now being con-
sidered by the faculty.
"In order to secure the broadest pos-
sible discussion of the report the
faculty has resolved itself into a com-
mittee of the whole and has invited
teachers of all ranks to take part in
the discussions and vote on the, var-
ous propositions. This discussion is
likely 'to continue for some weeks,
but when finished the committee of.
the whole will report to the faculty,
after which the faculty will proceed
to adopt such of the recommendations
as it sees fit, and report them to the
Regents.
Fifth Year Elective
"It is impossible to say at this time
what the gutcome will be but the tenor
of the discussions seem to point to-
ward a broadening of the courses in
engine'ering by the introduction of
some general studies. In order to
do this effectively a fifth year may
be added for those who wish the
broader course. If a fifth year is add-
ed it will not be obligatory, but will
be elective.
Presumably not much more techni-
cal work will be given in the five
years than is now offered. Presuma-
bly also the bachelor's degree will be
given at the end of four years and the
master's degree at the end of five
years.,
MICHIGAN TEAM DOfWNSfi '
ASSMPTION -SEXTETTE
SPR TT STARS FOR' OPPONENT
KAHN MAKES ONLY
s SCORE
Michigan's informal hockey team
proved its mettle last night when it
defeated the' strong Assumption ag-
gregation by a score of 1 to 0. Al-
though the sport has not' been given
a place in University athletics, the
men have been showing unusual inter-
est, and need but a little practice to
produce one of the strongest teams in
this part" of the country.
Spratt, of Assumption, played the
best game, and Michigan showed real
class in stopping him. Richards,
Michigan goal keeper, deserves credit
for his stellar -work. Kahn .scored the
only goal in the first period and play-
ed a fine game throughout.
The teams lined up as follows:
Machigan. ' Assumption
Barkell.......C.....Spratt kcapt.)
Kerr (capt.)- .. . L.W......Heffernan
Anderson R.W.........Maone
Kahn .........C.P........Durand
.ollis...... .' Jocs
Richards......G.. ..Nicholso
Substitution: Badour for Jocks.
Goal: Kahn.
DARDENELLES OPENED BYf
ALLIED SUPREME COUNCIL
(By Associated Press)
London, Feb. ,17.-The internation-
alization of the Dardenelles, which had
been forcast, was decided upon defin-
itely by the Allied supreme council
today. The details of the control of
the waterway, however, have not been
worked out.

One of the big questions to be decid-
ed is the policing of-the straits, and a
knotty problem is as to who will furn-
ish the necessary troops,
Further than deciding that Constan-
tinople is to remain under Turkish
control, the council has not drawn a
definite boundary line. Details such
as the exact frontiers remain to be de-
cided.
Three commissions were set up by
the council today .in 'connection with
the Turkish peace. One is to decide
upon the boundaries of the Armenian
ILepublic, another is to report on the
Turkish finances, and the third is to
examine-into the Greek claims in the
Smyrnas territory, which were dwelt
upon atlength by Premier Venizelos
in his statement of yesterday.' All the
commissions are expected to report to
the council the latter part of the
week.

"Y" i818TORE[A
IN PRES ENT DRIVE
Thomas Evans Says Chief Function
of Y. M. C. A. is to Serve
Churches in City +%
ORGANIZATION SETS $500 AS
GOAL IN CAMPUS CANVASS
In an All-campus campaign for the
promotion of good feeling between
the students, the church, and the "Y,"
the Y. M. C. A. is planning to reach
every man in the University this week
through a corps of 200 vounteer
workers.
The secondary purpose of -the move-
ment is to create an interest in re-
ligious education and to raise $5,000
to be expended for the work of the
University Y. M. C. A. and the local
churches.
Faculty Behind Movement
Neal Ireland, '20L, general chair-
man of the campaign stated that its
main purpose was to put the religious
work on the campus in the proper
light. Prof. Morris P. Tilley of the
rhetoric department, asserted that the
majority of the faculty members are
behind the movement in speaking be-
fore the campaign committee Monday
night. He said: "This is not only a
local. issue, but a national one. The
Y. M. C. A. 'is endeavoring to bj1iild
up the religious life of the nation."
Program Unique
Mr. Thomas A. Evans, secretary of
the University Y. M. C. A., said in re-
ference to the campaign: "The 'Y'
program this year has been unique at
Michigan and, in fact, quite new to the
whole country. Michigan is one of the
pioneers in the field of church co-op-
eration through student organizations.
Its chief departure from the standard
program of the past years lies in the
recognition of the fact that the 'Y'
should not exist.as a religious organ-.
ization apart from the churches.
"Y" to Serve Churches
"The 'Y' is here to-serve the enurch-
es, 'not to-lead an independent.exist-
ance.. The, University Y. M. C. A. is
the logical centralizing agency for the
work of the churches among the stu-
dents. Hereafter, it is hoped, students
will be approached but once for their,
financial and active support of the
campus religious agencies. One sub-
'scription, covering the budgets of both
church and Y. M. C. A. will save the
student from the annoyance of several,
calls from various organizations."
PRt PIO iKIRETURNS

English Interpreter of Kipling
Barrie Holds Audience.
Spellbound
.4

NO CLSSES MONDAY
Washington's Birthday to Be Observed
Throughout University
Although February 22, Washington's
birthday, falls on a Sunday this year
Michigan will commemorate the 178th
birth and anniversary of America's
first president by suspending classes
in all colleges of the University on
Monday.
Definite announcement to 'this ef-
fect is expected this week when Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins issues his
usual proclamation regarding the ces-
sation of classes for one day in hon-
or of, the "father of his country."
No general Washington birthday
services have been planned so far by
the University as a whole. Sen. E. B.
Sutherland, Utah's member of the up-
per house of cong ess, has been se-
cured by the Law Achool as the chief
speaker at its annual Washington ex-
ercises.
Services in most of the churches in
the city will be devoted Sunday in
memory of Washington. The usual
Washington day dinners, dances and
entertainments will be held Monday.
W TS'CHIEVES
U NIQUE SUCCESS

and

Declares

Morale of European
tries Is Wonderful

ADRI

0WILSO

Coun-

N DANCES
L IN EFFECT

will meet
in Room

g build-I

Following a meeting of the health
authorities with President Harry B.
Hutchins, held yesterday afternoon,
the president announced that it was
deemed advisable to continue the ban
on student dances under University
control for the remainder of this
week. It is expected that the ban
will be raised next week.
Both the University and city health'
officials agree in the belief that the in-
fluenza epidemic in Ann Arbor. is
practically over. .No new cases have
been reported. The officials state,,
however, that it is still advisable to
take every precaution against the dis-
ease.
STUDENT COUNCIL MEETS TO
ARRANGE 'CLASS ELECTIONS
Among the questions to be brought
up at the meeting of the Student coun"
cil to be held at 7:15 -o'clock tonight;
are: -
Arrangements for the election of,
J-lit, J-law, J-engineer and Graduate
council members, and also for the
replacement of members who may be
graduated in February; the election
of a corresponding secretary; the
setting of dates for Spring events, and
the laying of plans for the work o
the semester.

Prof. F. W. Pawlowski, head of the
aeronautical department in the Engi-
neering college, has returned from Eu-
rope, where he has been engaged in
aeronautical research for the )Polish
government.
Professor -Pawlowski left for Eu-
rope last summer, returning to Ann
Arbor only last week. He says that
although he found Europe badly dis-
organized, traveling conditions most
unpleasant, and the cost of traveling
ubusually high, yet the morale of the
countries is wonderful.,
Courses in general aviation, theory
of aviation, design of aeroplane mo-
tors, theory and design of propellers,
and laboratory in aero dynamics will
be offered this semester.
About 12 students have elected a
straight aeronautics course, while
many students from other departments
are taking courses in the aeronauti-
cal department.

STRONGLY ADVOCATES CAMPUS
TREATER FOR UNIVERSITY
Holding a large audience in Hill
auditorium spellbound for an hour
and a half during a recitation of se-
lections from the works of Barrie and
Kipling was the achievement last
night of Alexander Watson, the Eng-
lish interpretative reader, in one of
the finest readings given here.
Immitates Bell '
Mr. Watson opened his program with
a selection from Barrie's "A Window
in Thrums" and "Auld Licht idylls,"
and"A Holiday in Bed,' 'each of which
was received with tumultuous ap-
plause. The remainder df the recital
comprised a varied assortment of Kip-
ling~s 'poems, including "The Bell
Buoy," "If," "The Marriedi Man,"
"Boots," "Mandalay," "The Ant," and
"Fuzzy Wuzzy." Mr. Watson's perfect
imitation of a bell ringing at sea in
"The Bell Buoy" astounded the audi-
ence.
The selections rendered by Mr. Wat-
son furnished him with a splendid op-
portuiylty to display his varied tal-
ents thvoughout his entire program.
His finished gestures and power to
simulate the voices of different peo-
ple, particularly during the Barrie
passages, added greatly to the pleas-
ure derived from the speakers mag-
netic voice.
Excells in All
Whether he represented the fighting
qualities of "The Married Man," the
monotony of infantry marching in
"Boots," the Englishman's disgust of
the camel in. "The Ant," or the Brit-
isher's admiration for courage in
"Fuzzy Wuzzy," he equally excelled in
,expression or gesticulation. The audi-
ence showed its admiration by greet-
ing the conclusion of each piece with
an unusual amount of applause for
such performances.
Dramatic Activities Invaluable .
"I believe that students at tle Uni-
versity of Michigan can make much
use .of a campus theater,' said Alex-
ander Watson, in commenting on the
move ent to establish a campus thea-
ter at the University.
"Cambridge, Oxford, and English
public schools have their dramatic so-
cieties but they have to rent theaters,
often for a week, in which to present
their productions. I consider dra-
Inatic activities to be invalualble to
university .students, provided it is not
overdone, because it furnishes them
with a wide knowledge of life"
Mr. Watson stated that the aenefit2
of a campus theater such as is being
planned here would depend greatly
on local conditions.
Italian Officers Suppress Newspaper
Rome, Feb. 17.-(Havas).-Govern-
ment officials occupied the offices of
the newspaper Idea Nazionale last
'eight, it being alleged that it had
printed an article hostile to France

FROM SENAT
ANSWER TO BE S
SUPREME COUN
President Holds Key to T
age; May Release It f
cation Upon Own In
(By Associated Pi
' London, Feb. . - T,
embassy was engaged ton
ing ,and forwarding the
government a reply of t
council to President Wils
,note, which will be in ti
the Washington governn
row.
The council made it k
daily semi-official commt
the \newspapers that it d
pose to make public the
ence, so 'that the question
the text pf the note will
the- world rests with Presi
The council issued' an e
nial of French newspaper
it was persuadied to modi
en the first draft of the n
ident Wilson by intervent
ed by Viscount Grey, Lord
cil and Austin Chamber
Washington, Feb. 17..
supreme council has been
President Wilson,'it was d
day, that if the proposed.
tlement through which tb
government is not a party
force, the United States
to consider withdrawing t
Versailles from senate cC
Not a Threat
.The president's ommI
not in the nature of a ti
common sense of the term,
that it was merely a ta'
situation in which the U
might find itself if asked
to agreement in which it']
in the making and to whc
posed. ,
The explanation was t
cial quarters that the le
tions was 'to be the ins'
'enforcing various agreem
boundaries and the likfe an
United States becamie a p
treaty of Versailles that w
scribing to the enfor.ceme:
nments to which it had not
its approval or consent.
Treates linsepah
It was explained furth
Anglo-French-Amnrican
the treaty of Versailles ,
ered inseparable so far a
tion was concerned.
PBES. IIJUTHNS TO H4
~DR. M. L BURTON J
President Harry B. H
give a dinner in honor o
elect Marion L. Burton Th
at. the Union.' The deans4
ous colleges will be the
guests at the affair.

DR. J. G. SCHl
AS PRES

for
. be
this
the

LIT-MEDICS, NOTICE!2

'
r
11
1

Ithaea; N. Y., Feb. 17
Gould Schurman, preside:
university for nearly 28
dered his resignation to
sity's general administra
tee at a meeting of, that b
IL CIRCOLO D'ANNUNZ
MEET MONDAY IN
Il Circolo D'Annunzio,
ganized for those students
terested in Italian literatu
at 7 o'clock Wednesday
'18, in Lane hall. Candida
bership are especially inv

hed will
ver ad-
eceived.
in cop-
be re-

Attention of students in the
combined medical and literary
course is called to the'fact that
two years of Latin is necessary;
before entering the school. This
may be filled by taking special
tuition courses, Latin Y and Z,
both of which will be given this
semester. Latin Z will be given
in Summer school for students
Latin Y th semester, but Latin
Y will not be repeated in Sum-
mer school. A. G. HALL,
Registrar.
, - .

TRY-OUT

e

Albrecht Dies Sunday.
Feb. 17.-Duke Johann
Mecklenburg-Schwerin,
rad, Mecklenburg, on

i
i

Any'men wi
The Daily si
should report
o'clock any af

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