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February 17, 1920 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

wb.

WHAT'S GOING ON

-i

ig Suitings are

i

w ready, are you?

Karl Yaicolm

East Liberty St.

Malcolm Building

TUESDAY
8:00-Chimes board meeting in room
319 of Union.
7:00-Culver club meeting in room
316 9f Union.
7:00-Youngstown - Michigan elb
meeting in room 306 of Union.
7:30-Union orchestra rehearsal on
second floor of Union. Open to
everyone.
7:30-Freshman Mandolin' club re-
hearsal in Lane hall.
7:30--Michigan Dames meet in Lane
hall.
8:00-Alexander Watson gives series
of dramatic interpretations and re-
citals in Hill auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
7:00-Varsity band rebeargal In Uni-
versity Hall.
7 :30-Rocky Mountain club meets in
Lane hall. All. men and women
from Rocky Mountain states invit-
ed to attend.
8:00--Dr. John Haynes Holmes lec-
tures in Natural Science auditorium
before Intercollegiate Socialist so-
ciety.
8:00-1Mr. Edward A. Rosenblatt lec-
tures to Intercollegiate Zionist as-
sociation in Lane hall. Election of
officers.
THURSDAY
7:00-Reserve military aviators meet
in room 304 of Union.
9:00-Christian Science society meets
in Lane hall.
U-NOTICES
The next meeting of Fa Soidad His-
panica will be held March 2.
Geology 20 lectures by Mr. Leverett
will begin at 7 o'clock Thursday,
Feb. 19,4in room 321 Natural Sci-
ence building.
All students who work on campus
publications, TheDaily, Michiganen-
sian, Technic, Chimes, Students' Di-
rectory, Gargoyle, Athletic Program,
Law Review, whether on the busi-
nes or editorial side, are asked to
be present at 12.05 p. m. Wednesday
in front of the Press building for a
Joint publication photograph.,

,

Si

-7W-

t

Nickels Arcade

. ... .

%LEANERS '
--AND
)RESSERS
Zo1 E, WRS~lffoTQM
None 628.4

T uttle'S
Lunches
Nunnally's
!Candy
Maynard St.

ANN ARBOR CHOP SUE!Y
Excellent CHOP SUTEY from
11:80 a. mn to midnight
Steaks and Chops 814 S. State'

ed while

1AUMNIDICS
(Continued from Page One)
munity where U. of M. graduates find
themselves.
Ann Arbor to Be Center
"Of course the first place to turn
for organization is the student body
at Ann Arbor. Considerable work has
been done there already. The 9,000
students are being developed into en-
thusiastic boosters for Michigan and
they will be urged to boost when they
get back home for vacations and to
keep on boosting when they graduate.
By boosting class reunions on a larger
scale than ever and through college
publications we can also stimulate
spirit.
"Student spirit has 4been stirred up.
I have been out to Ann Arbor a great
deal during the past few weeks and
I must say the .re-birth and flaming
forth of Michigan spirit has been
most gratifying.
Athletic Outlook Better
"The work of organizing and im-
proving Michigan athletics has made
great strides. We now have the names
of 700 prep school athletes gathered
from every source and we will try to
enroll them at Michigan through fair
and legitimate means. The most en-
couraging news we have had since
Michigan defeated M. A. C. last fall is
that Tad Weimann, the great tackle,
will be back next fall and *ready to
play.aCoach Yost can do nothing with-
out a line and Weimann will be a
tower of strength to the line.
"One conference after another has
been held, at Ann Arbor with alumni
from Detroit and otfier centers pre-
sent. Results are being obtained.
Coach Yost will have at least seven
assistant coaches to aid him and sev-
eral more if enough candidates for the
football team turn out to warrant it.
The graduate athletic manager, Phil
Bartelme, will have more assistance
and the big crowds expected next fall
will be handled in an efficient man-
ner. The Athletic association is also
scouring the country for a first-class
trainer. There will be plenty of
equipment, and the complaints of last
year will be eradicated. An up-to-
date business method of storing equip-
ment, handing it out, and keeping
track of it, will be installed.
Plan New Grandstand
"An additional grandstand, to cost in
the neighborhood of $75,000, will be
built and we hope 'to kill the complaint
that thousands of people did not want
to go to the games because they fear-
ed they could not get a seat.
"The student body are working like
beavers to prevent a repetition of the
disastrous football season of last year.
$So many stars,,were, ineligible last
year because of scholarship that com-
mittees aienow formed to keep tab
on'all athletes in their studies and to
assist them in keeping up their schol-
arship. Another committee records
jobs, such as clerking, waiting table
and tending furnace, etc., for athletes,
who have to work their way through
college.
"Still another committee will1handle
publicity and will keep high schools
and prep-schools advised of the ad-
vantages the University of Michigan
offers.
Michigan Athletics Clean
"Now-there has been a little specu-
lation as to whether Michigan men
wil offnet material or extraordinary

inducements, such as the payment of
money, to induce athletes to enter
Michigan. Some of the greatest stars
in this state have been persuaded in
the past to enter other colleges by
what are politely called "extraordin-
ary inducements." We n1g& lose this
year some of the most celebrated stars
in the state, boys who should go to
Ann Arbor, but who have been ap-
proached with alluring offers, by
agents of other schools.
"But the University of Michigan
would rather loss all the high school
stars in the state than buy them, as
negro slaves were formerly bought on

the auction block by the highest bid.
der.
"Michigan is a public school and is
supported largely by the state. First.
we should organize the alumni in this
state to the last detail so that the
University gets all it needs from the
state legislature. Other middle western
legislatures have been getting more
money from their legislatures that we
have. Our legislature last session
showed a splendid spirit and gave the
University all it asked. But there
will undoubtedly) be a movement on
foot throughout the nation to cut down
taxes of all sorts and the University
may have to fight for its budget. Mich-
igan is the oldest ai% the biggest state:
university ail we should see that it
retains its standing.
To, Encourage Gifts
"Second, we should encourage gifts
and endowments from public-spirited
citizens whether they are graduates of
Michigan or not. There are 150 mil-
lionaires in this state and none of

to give money for special funds to
fight diseases, such as pneumonia and
the flu, develop medicine, develop eng-
ineering, aid the study of social and
political problems, buy books, increase
the salaries of instructors and pro-
fessors, or in a hundred and one ways
where the money would be spent to
wonderful advantages."
SUGGEST SEVERAL CHANGES
IN ATHLETIC MANAGEMENT
(Continued froni Page One)
tion. Chairman Aigler explained that
this organization would embrace three
types of work: (1) extension of the
work of the Intramural department;
(2) training students to go out and
teach physical education; (3) a sum-
mer course, to be made up of our in-
tercollegiate coaching staff,'to give the
same sort of work that is now being
given at Illinois.

you wait.

THE ,INN
1
AT LANE HALL
GOOD HOME COOKED
ME.A LS
Lunch and Dinner at $5.75 per Week
SERVICE "TABLE D'HOTE"

JUR SECOND SEMESTER

ORDER

Will receive our most Eanest and Courteous Attention

ext Books

ew and Second-hand for all Departments

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Student Supplies

appetite,
The flavor digestion' 1
lasts--ard. the/
electrically-
sealed/
Package
to You with all its
goodness Perfect-
lY Preserved.
4r
Sealed
Tight-
L
C EEC HEWING U
; , WR1LEY Q/

.2

luding Lab Coats, Aprons,' Shop Tools,

ose-leaf Note Books Etc.

.%

Engineers' Supplies

of all kinds - Some Real Bargains in Second
hand Sets of Instruments.

,a

Service

The foundation on which our rapidiy growing
business is built -
Every article, price and quality guaranteed at

AHRSU N IVERSITY
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WE ARE THE ONLY
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Statlonery, Fountain Pens
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