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January 30, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-30

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1920.

PRICE THREE CEI!

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16E CUT

EASE

BILL .
PIRACY
fUnion, At-
th Gomp-

NEWLAS TO RESISTER
Will Organize Classes for Students
Entering Next Semester
Students of the literary college who
intend entering the law school next
semester are requested by Dean HAn-
ry M. Bates of the Law school to hand
in their names at the secretary's of-
fice in the law building immediately.
A large number of new students,
according to Dean Bates, and sever-
jal new classes will have to be or-
ganized to handld them.. As it is Im-
possible to organize the schedule un-
til the number entering is ascer-
tained, it is essential that the office.
be notified at once.
A series of lectures will be given
in the law building next semester by
Arthur H. Ryall, who is considered
an expert lawyer and eminent practi-
tioner. Mr. Ryall will lecture on "The
Law of Public Utilities and Practice
Before the Public Utilities Commis-
sion." These lectures will be open to
students of the law school, the po-
litical science, and economics de-
partments. The first will be given
Feb. 16.
FLU EPIDEMICAUOUT
OVER SAYSWESSINBER
ONLY 25 CASES REPORTED YES-
TERDAY COMPARED TO 62
WEDNESDAY

ANNOUNCE RULES
GOV1ERNING 1-HOP

House Parties to Begin Friday
ernoon and End Sunday
Afternoon

Aft.

British Drama ist Says Moral
Will Save World from
Itaterialism

Idea

I

ted Press)
. - Direct charg-
roads" were plan-
es as soon as the
di to private own-

ident of the Brotherhood
ive Firemen and Engine-
ing before the National
ation here today.
denounced the Cummins'
fore the senate and join-
muel Gmpers, president.
ican Federation of Labor,
k on compulsory arbitra-
r
s>me of Conspiracy
amins' bill," he said, "is
of a conspiracy to reduce
v their present inadequate
the roads are returned to

s, he con-
cut in pay
tterpt its
prosecu-

ORINKWATE H LAUDS
IDEALS OF LINCOLN

idence furnish-
of certain rail-
have said that

strike on
it is pro-

ich an attitude of the
in the coal strike."
r., Jan. 29. - Walker
ctor general of rail-
ress before the Trans-
here tonight, urged a
ess earnings of rail-
is above a reasonable
to protect the public
earnings -of very pros-
s and to insure a fair
ads.
general urged also the
isolidation of all the
antry into a few large
ggested"the participa-
blic and labor in the
the railroads.
7B TO BECOME
ENT ORGANIZATION
ines' club of the Uni-'
a permanent organi-
lenced at the second1
society held last Wed-
the Union when about
bers of the Marine
ted to adopt a consti-
plans to carry onthe
ranch of the service.
'23, was elected ser-
It was decided to
taken of the members
ganensian at 12:15

'Only 25 new cases of influenza were
reported in the last 24 hours, thus
showing quite a decrease from the 62
cases reported on Wednesday," said
Dr. J. A. Wessinger of the city
health department yesterday after-
noon. "I expect that the epidemic,
will be over in a week."
Two new cases of pneumo'nia de-
-veloped from thy 25 influenza cases
and one pneumonia patient died in the
hospital. The rest of the cases were
mild.
The University health service re-
ported 35 new eases the same as the
day before and no new cases of pneu-
monia.
Yesterday The Daily stated that the
city health service had 35 new cases'
on Wednesday, but later reports rais-
ed the' number to 62. This, with the
35 cases from the University health
service, made 97 the total number of
new cases Wednesday in Ann Arbor.
Compared with the 60 cases reported
yesterday afternoon this shows a de-
cided improvement.
Insurance Open to Ex-Service Men
Ex-service men may still be rein-
stated in the war risk insurance, ac-
cording to Director R. G. Cholmeley-
Jonies of the government bureau of"
war risk 'insurance. Reinstatement
can b'e obtained by a payment of only
two months' premiums within- 18
months of discharge.
Craftsmen to Meet Tonight
All student Masons are invited to
attend the dinner of the Craftsman
club at 6 o'clock tonight in the Ma-
sonic temple. The third degree will
be conferrd as there will be no meet-
ing tomorrow night.

THREE PICTURES OF DANCERS
TO BE TAKEN DURING DANCE
Rules relative to organizations and
fraternities holding Hop house parties
have, been announced by Prof. Louis
A. Strauss, chairman on the Commit-
tee on Student Affairs. They are:
1. House parties shall commence
not earlier than Friday morning and
end not later than Sunday afternoon.
2. The selection of chaperons for
house parties is left entirely in the
hands of the group concerned. The
chaperones should be definitely in-
formed' that there shall be no danc-
ing at the house after the Hop. Aft-
er a reasonable time for refreshments
and rest the party should break up.
Dances and other festivities on Sat-
urday night should end promptly at
midnight.
Announce Chaperones
The general chaperones for the Hop
are: President Harry B. Hutchins
aVd Mrs. Hutchins, the Regents and
'their wives, the Deans of the different
schools of the University and their
wives, Assistant Dean Charles W. Ed-
munds and Mrs. Edmunds, Assistant
Degn William 'H. Butts and Mrs. Butts,
Registrar A. G. Hall and Mrs. Hal,
Treasurer Robert A. Campbell. and
Mrs. Campbell, Secretary Shirley W.
Smith and. Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick P. Jordan, Prof. Louis A.
Strauss and Mrs. Strauss, Prof. Rob-
ert M. Wenley and Mrs. Wenley, Prof.
Morris P. Tilley and Mrs. Tilley, Prof.
Evans Holbrook and Mrs. Holbrook,
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler and Mrs. Aig-
ler, Prof R. E. McCotter and Mrs. Mc-
Cotter, Prof. R. W. Bunting and Mrs.
Bunting, Prof. George W. Patterson
and Mrs. Patterson, Prof. H. H .Hig-
bee and Mrs. Higbee, Dr. W. E. For-
sythe and Mrs. Forsythe, Dr. Hugh
Cabot and Mrs. Cabot.
To Take Three Pictures
Three pictures of the Hop are to'
be taken by Spedding. They will be
a picture of the "M" which is to be
formed at te end of the grand march,
one which will be taken of the dance
floor during the evening, and one of
the gymnasium during the afternoon
after the decorations have been com-
pleted.
Group pictures of the different or-
ganizations will be taken in a room
which will be provided for the pu'r-
pose. These pictures will be put in
folders on which the're will bea
photograph of the University. The
price of the folder will be $1 and $1
for each picture. Orders will be tak-
en during the evening.
The formal invitations for the Hop
will be mailed to ticket holders so1
that they will be received by Satuir-
day.
Grad Addresses Phi Sigma Soeiety1
Members of the Phi Sigma society I
met last night in the Natural Science
building. "The Hypothesis of Form-1
ative Stuff" was explained by Ernest
Reed of the Graduate School.j

ALLIANCE BETWEEN ENGLAND
AND AMERICA RECOMMENDED

(By Samuel Lamport)
I "The moral idea of Abraham Lin-
coln is the sole thing that can oppose
the materialism which is threatening
to bring the world to saster," said
John Drinkwater, the English poet,
last evening in Hill auditorium.
. Defines Moal Idea
This was defined by him as "indi-
vidual liberty growing in the soil of
national unity." He stated that the
political and social well-being of the
world could best be secured by a
spiritual and intellectual alliance be-
tween America and England. He de-
clared that a military or political al-
liance would not afford' it.
"The fundamental significance of
Iincoln's character lies in his public
service," the speaker stated. "Any
president of the United States is con-
fronted by a mass of paper facts which
is apt to make him forget the living
facts behind them. No one since 011-
ver Cromwell has been comparable to
him in his possession of human sym-
pathy besides Abraham Lincoln. This
fact, and not his salvation of the
American union or emancipation of a,
subject race is the chief significance
he bears to all the people of the
world.s
Reads Parts of Play
The reason why poets, artists, sculp-
tors, and novelists are finding in Lin-
coln material for their purpose was
explained by the lecturer to be due to
his character corresponding to the ex-
perience of artists. Mr. Drinkwater,
who is the .possessor of an extraor-
dinarily clear and melodious voice,
entertained his audience by reading
several poems and parts of his play,
"Abraham Lincoln," at the beginning
and conclusion of his address.
ASTRONOMERS BELIEVE1
VE NUS SIGNALING EATH
SCIENTISTS DISCOUNT MESSAGES
SAID TO COME FROM
MARS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 29. - If wireless
messages are being received on' the
earth from some other planet as sug-
gested by William Marconi it is not
Mars sending the signals but most
probably Venus, says Dr. C. B. Abbot,
director of the Smithsonian Astrophy-
sical observatory and assistant secre-
tary of the Smithsonian institution.
Dr. Abbot makes no claim that the
mysterious wireless signals do come
from another planet but says if they
do Mars is eliminated as a possibil-
ity because known conditions on that
planet probably would not permit the
existence of any form of living crea-
ture.
"In the first place," says Dr. Ab.
bot, "on account -of the greater dis-
tance nearly two and one-half times
less radiation from the sun reaches
Mars than reaches the earth. It is
probably 100 per cent colder on the
averageton that distant planet than on
'the earth. Knowing how low temper-
atures occur on this earth in the win-
ter season it will be readily realized
that what 100 degrees colder would
mean. In the second place even if any1
form of life could withstand that de-
gree of cold it is known by the inves-
tigations of Director Campbell of
Look Lick observatory that there is
practically no water vapor in the at-
mosphere surrounding Mars, which
fact crosses out the possibility of that1
planet supporting any vegetation or
any form of food for living creatures.
"The planet Venus, on the other
hand, shows every condition necessary

for maintaining life. From this it
may be concluded that if any planet
is trying to signal our earth it is
Venus and not Mars."
SIGNING OF ESTHONIAN
PACT SCHEDULED YESTERDAY
Copenhagen, Jan. 29. - A peace
treaty between Esthonia and Soviet
Russia was to have been signed to-
day according to a. Reval dispatch;

Editor's Note.-The following is' the
third of a series of articles,'concern-
ing the relation between the literary
-college and the professional schools
of the University, which have been
written by prominent members of the
faculty for The Daily. This topic will
come up for discussion at the meet-
ing of the University forum to be held
next week,
(By Prof. W. C. Hoad.)
President Vincent once made the re-
mark that modern engineering edu-
cation had substituted the newer ideal
of service to humanity for the older'
college ideal of personal culture. This
remark may be taken fairly to repre-
sent the general purpose underlying
the educational programs in the col-
lege of engineering here at Michigan.
In these programs of study the stu-
dent is led into, or at least'toward, an
appreciative understanding of men
and 'their institutions and needs, and
into a sound knowledge of scientific
principles and of constructive mate-
rials, and finally into the power of
effectively applying these . principles
and materials to the uses of mankind
Programs Vary
The several programs of study vary
somewhat in content, but ordinarily
include carefully planned courses in
English and at least one other mod-
jrn language, 'in history, literature or
philosophy, in chemistry, physics,
mathematics, geology, mechanics, as-
tronomy and political science, in the
constitution, manufacture, properties,
and uses of the more important eng-
ineering materials, and in the prin-
ciples of sound engineering design and
administration.
The average student's program cov-
ers 145 credit hours (140 credit hours
'being the minimum), and requires
nearly if not quite 10. semesters of
work for its completion. This is about
the same length as the "combination
courses in the literary college and
Law school.
Favor Definite Programs
Under the leadership of the Society
for the Promotion of Engineering Ed-
(Continued on Page Eight)
HOFMAN REVEALS
HIS AUTHORSHIP
Much interest has been evinced in
the identity of the composer of "Pen-
guine," "East and West," and' "The
Sanctuary," ascribed to Dvorsky, but
Josef Hofman who plays in Hill aud-
itorium Feb. 10 has finally admitted
that he is the compser and will in-
clude these numbers in his program
here..
The program:
Sonata in C major, Op. 53 .. Beethoven
Allegro con brio
Molto adagio
Allegretto moderato
Soiree en Grenade ........Debussy
Perpetuum mobile .......... Weber
Ballade in F major..........
Valse in A flat major, Op. 42 ...
Nocturne in F major.........
Polonaise in A major........Chopin
Penguine...................
East and West..... ......
The Sanctuary...........'Dvorsky
"The -Bat" Valse.............
.Strauss - Godowsky

C T. HOLMEVISITS HERE
Australian Professor Visits Michigan
on Way Home from England
Capt. E. R. Holme, professor of
English in the University of Sidney,
Australia, and who recently served
as chairman of the administrative
commission of the Australian univer-
sity in London, was a guest of the
University yesterday. Captain Holme
is returning to his home in Australia
and is visiting American universities;
on the way.
The deans of the various colleges
of the University met AWith him yes-
terday following his arrival here, in
the office of President Harry B.
Hutchins, for a conference in which
the problems of higher educational1
instittiions in Australia and America
were discussed.
IDEALS OFSERIEARE
ESSENTIAL TO ENGINEERS
-PROF. W. C. HOAD.
STUDENTS TAUGHT TO UNDER .
STAND MEN AND THEIR NEEDS
AN A FUNDAMENTAL

CLASS Of 1920 TO
HEAR BURTON AT
COMMENCEMEN',

ANNOUNCED YESTERDAY
INVITATION WAS AC.
CEPTED

TO MEET WITH BOARD
' OFREGENTS FEB. 24
To Talk Before University of Mieh,
igan Club in Detroit,
Feb. 19
President-elect M. L. Burton of the
University, has accepted 'an invitation
to speak this spring at the commence-
ment exercises of the class of 1920.
Announcement of this fact was made
yesterday by President 'Harry B
Hutchins. President-elect M. L. 'Bur-
ton, upon his appearance at the com-
mencement exercises, will for the firsi
time, be presented to the students'of
the University.
To Meet Regents
Coincident with this announcemeni
came the word yesterday, that Presi-
dent-elect Burton will take part it
the official business of the University
for the first time on Feb. 20, when he
will meet with the Board of Regents
The business of the meeting has not
been announced. It is thought, how-
ever, that it will relate to the new
administration.
President-elect Burton is scheduled
to speak before the University o
Michigan club of D'roit, Feb. 19, al
a banquet to' be held at the Detroil
Athletic club. Following the ban-
quet, Mr. Burton will come to Ann Ar-
.bor for his meeting with the Regent.
. Seniors Pleased
The announcement that he will be
one of the spekers at the commence-
*ment to be held June 24, is greeted
by the officers of the graduating class
as a signal honor.
"We are very glad to hear that the
President-elect of the University is te
be our commencement speaker," Wil-
liam Hinshaw, president of the sen-
ior lit class declared last night. "Al-
though we will not be in school under
him, we will have had the honor of
hearing him deliver our commence-
ment address."
Waldo McKee, president of the sen-
ior engineering class, voiced similar
opinions.
"I am indeed glad to hear that
President Burton is to be our com-
mencement speaker," McKee said.
A S K RELEASE OF 4
RED CROSS WORKERS

TH

Public Presentation Of Athletic
n ia Approved 'By Faculty Ien

ne students in th
planning to joi'
e invited tobe i
according to th

D IN HOP LISTS!
lists giving number of
ames and addresses of
ests for publication in
in extra should be sent

0 Universal approbation of a cere--
e mony at which "M" sweaters and let-
n ters will be formally given out is the
result of 'an extensive investigation of
e the opinon of men prominent on the
_ faculty. This affair, it is hoped by
- those undertaking the planning of the
details, may become an annual event
and in time be classed among the
honored traditions of the University.
No Ceremony Now
At present the athletic awards are
given ,out without any public recog-
nition on the part of tl(e students, al-
though steps toward establishing
such a formal custom has been hint-
ed at in the annouliting of the recip-
ients of the "M's" at the last football
dinner held in the fall. This, how-
ever, covers only those who get the
insignia for work in football, while
the new plan will include a more gen-
eral presentation of athletic honors.
Prof. John R. Effinger, dean of the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, expressed his approval of the
general idea in the following words,

"I remember the public presentations
which took place at the time of the
annual Michigan Union dinner in
Waterman gymnasium. It seems to
me that some such ceremony might
well be revived."
Dean Cooley Favors Plan'
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of th4 en-'
gineering college also favored the es-
tablishing of such an exercise. He
said, "The occasion for giving the
"M" should be dignified and public.
The presentation exercises in the past
were considerable affairs and I sup-
posed that they would be continued.
In my opinion, the 'M's' might better
be kept in the cellar than to have no
ceremony for such an auspicious oc-
casion for both athlete and student."
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman of
the Board in Control of Athletics, was
in sympathy with such a plan and
stated, "If it is possible to work out
a plan so that all branches of athletics
can participate in such an affair it
would be a dignified and inspiring
ceremony."

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 29.-Request for
the release of the four American Red
Cross workers recently captured by
the Bolshevik in Siberia already has
been forwarded to the Russian Soviet
authorities ,through the Czechs Red
Cross headquarters were informed to-
day by representatives from Vladivo-
stock in a cablegram which also stat-
ed the prisoners are not believed to
be in any danger.
The cable advices explained that
the expression of optimism concerning
the safety of the Red Cross person-
nel was founded on reports from the
newly conquered parts of Siberia.
Dream City to Hold First Election
Port Huron, Jan. 29. - Marysville,
the "dream city" as it has become
known, will hold its first election
Thursday, Jan. 29. The election, how-
ever, will be a formality as only/one
candidate for each office had filed nom-
inating petitions when the ,time for
recording these papers expired. Wil-
liam H. Watkins will be village pres-
ident; J. B. Pierce, clerk, and the
following' four commissioners: Mrs.
Grace A. Peck, Ferris D. Stone, Jay
Morton and J. C. {Barron.
These officials will hold 'office one
year.
Baggage of Ex-Service Men in N. Y.
Detroit, Jan. 29. - Vive thousand
pieces of baggage belonging to Mich-
igan ex-service men are in New York,
according to estimates made by the
Knights of Columbus. State Deputy
Ernest A. O'Brien, of Detroit, is urg-
ing all Michigan ex-service men to-
communicate with the "Lost Baggage
Department" of Knights of Columbus,
at 461 Fourth avenue,. New York.

lies to iae-
the Hop as

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