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January 28, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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AY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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a. 90.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY,- JANUARY 28, 1920.

PRICE THR

il"a

VIES

COMMITTEE QUITS
FRATERNITY BODYBRI(E'S PLAY TO

PLANS FOR DISTRIBUTING "M'S" AND
AWARDING BLANKETS SENT TO BOARD

IN CABINET,
I EXPECTED
ARE NO GUESS WHO
TAKE LANE'S
PLACE

Athletic Board to Act Independently
of Interfraternity Council.

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to"" -".

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SSOR NAMED
RETARY LANE

Houston to Be Replaced by Meredith
as Secretary Rf Agriculture;
Ends Long Service
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 27.-Two more
changes in President Wilson's cabinet
were made today and a third is ex-
pected in the near future.
David Franklin Houston, of St. Lou-
is, who has been secretary of agricul-
ture since the beginning of the Wilson
administration, was given the treasury
portfolios and Edwin L. Meredith of
Des Moines was named to succeed
him as head of the department of ag-
riculture.
The third cabinet change expected'
soon is the appointment of a secre-
tary of the interior to succeed Frank-
lin K. Lane, who desires to retire to
private life. Mr. Lane's successor has
not yet been selected and officials
generally would not hazard a guess as
to whom it would be.

The withdrawal of the athletic com-
mittee of the interfraternity confer-
ence was unanimously passed on at
the meeting last night of the confer-
ence. This action was taken follow-
ing a report of the committee, in
which it was stated that the activities
of the committee had assumed Univer-
sity proportions and should not be re-
stricted to the conference.
Since the organization of the com-
mittee it has endeavored to unite the
student body, faculty, and alumni in
an effort to better athletic conditions.
It was the opinion of the conference
that the committee had progressed so
far that it should be a University= in-
stitution.
An interfraternity conference din-
ner was proposed at the meeting bud
the matter was left to be taken up
next semester.
FACULTY BEGI61NS
FORBUM DISCUSSION
Articles to Discuss Relation Between
Literary College and Pro-
fessional Schools
PROF. R. W..SELLARS SUGGESTS
RELATION IS ILL DEFINED

U SER BUFFET
1LLO0WINS J1"HOP
OMMODATE DANCERS
EARLY MORNING
MEAL

To accommodate those who wish a
buffet lunch after the J-hop, the Union
will serve one immediately following
the dance in the main dining room.
As a limit of 125 couples has been
placed, reservations must be made at
once with Dennis Donovan, steward.
The price per couple will be $2.25.
Furniture for the booths in the gym-
nasium must be provided by each or-
ganization. The committee announc-
ed Tuesday night that table lights
may be placed in booths, providing
that arrangements for conhecting them
be made in time.
Each organization must furnish its
own punch bowl and wafer basket, for
which the committee will provide
punch and wafers. Taxies will. drive
.up at the west entrance, between the
two gymnasiums, where a footman
will be stationed. In case of inclement
weather a canopy will be built to cov-
er the entrance.
Men's wraps will be checked in Sara.
Caswell Angell hall and women's
wraps in. the basement of Barbour
gymnasium.
Dr. Zwvemer To
ie Visitor Here
Dr. Samuel M. 7wemer, who is said
to be the greatest authority in the
world on Mohammedanism and Mo-
hammedan countries, will be here this
week end.
Dr. Zweier will speak, in several
churches and at several meetings
during his short stay here. There will
be a meeting of the faculties of all
the colleges Saturday evening at Lane
hall to meet him, and he will give an
address then. He will leave Monday.'
Dr. Zwemer is a native of Michigan
and spoke at the University several
years ago. He was one of the prin-
cipal speakers at the Des Moines Stu-
dent Volunteer convention where he
was invited by the Ann Arbor dele-
gation to visit the University of Mich-
igan.

BE GIVEN TONIGHT
Ruth Minor, '22, Has Lead in Show;
Part of Colonel Grey Taken
by Albert Jacobs
PRODUCTION OF COMEDY CLUB
READY AFTER 'SIX WEEKS' WORK

In order that the various points of
view naturally taken toward the re-
lation between the literary college
and the professional schools may be
indicated, the secretary of the Univer-
sity Forum has made arrangements
to have a series of articles publishb-
ed in The Daily. These articles will
be by representative men from four
of the colleges. It is hoped that these
articles will, like the present one, be
taken merely as suggestive.
A true forum should be a place for
the creation of views by the interplay
of ideas. Dogmatism and fixity of
standards should be avoided like the
plague. We members of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, proud of our place
and work, are desirous to educate
ourselves through friendly and intell-
igent discussion.
ROY WOOD SELLARS, Secretary.

James M. Barrie's "Alice Sit by the
Fire" will be presented #,t 8:15 o'clock
tonight at the Whitney theater by the
Comedy club.
Six weeks of almost constant} re-
hearsal, one dress performance on
Monday night, and final instructions
to the cast last night have prepared
the cast for tonight's production.
Work has been under the direction
of Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson of the en-
gineering English department, who
has acted as producer for- the Classi-
cal club and Masques plays.
Resolves into Game
Ruth Minor, '22, appearing as Alice
Grey, takes the part of a mother who
has never grown up, a mother who re-
sorts to strange means to trap the lat-
ent affection &f her children. The play
resolves itself into a game between the
mother and father, for the love of
their children. Albert Jacobs, '21,
plays the part of Colonel Grey* with
Mildred Henry, '22, and.Matthew Lam-
port, '22, as Amy and Cosmo, the chil-
dren.
In the supporting cast will be seen
Isabel Kemp, '22, as Genevra; Elwyn
Davies, '21, as Steve Rollo; Ann Mc-
Gurk, '20, as Richardson, Frank An-
drus, '21E, as James, and Harriet
Woodworth, '20, and Marjorie VanI
Norman, as nurse and maid, respec-
tively.I
To Be Two Scenes
Two sets of scenery will be used
for the play, one a dining room in
which the daughter has endeavored to
cenceal the purpose of the room with-
out detracting from its real useful-
ness, and the other the man's cham-
bers at night.
Ticket sales for the play tonight
will be conducted at Graham's book
store until 5:30 o'clock, when it will
be transferred to the box office at the
Whitney theater. The committee in
charge of the sale reports a large sale
for the performance.
Music for the play is to be furnish-
ed by Phil Diamond's six piece or-
chestra.
R COFFiCERSDEMOTED
Men Returned to, Rank Held Before
War; Same in Other Colleges

4
r

Presentation Should Be Formal Affair,
Says Carl Johnson, 'SO
Plans for a new method of distrib-
uting "M's" and for the awarding of
blankets to athletes have been .pre-
sented to the Board in Control of Ath-
letics by Carl Johnson, '20, captain of
the track team.
At present "M's" and "M" hats are
given out at the athletic office when-
ever they arrive and are called for
by those who have earned them. Ac-
cording to Johnson the presentation
of numerals and letters is made a sol-
emn affair at many universities, and
FUTU RE-HASh NS
Audience Throngs Auditorium of Nat-
ural Science Building to
Hear Professor
HARVARD DEAN SAYS TREATY
NOT YET A FINAL DOCUMENT

(By Prof. Roy Wood Sellars)
The program .committee naturally
desired to select as initial topic for
discussion in the University Forum
a subject of at once general interest ,
and constructive character.
Relation Ill Defined
It believes that it has found such
a subject in "The Relation between
the Literary College and the Profes-
sional Schools." The relation is at
present an il, defined one, depending
more upon past drift than upon ser-
ious reflection. Of course this was in-'
evitable.
Several of the professional schools
both within and without the literary
college have begin to stir in this mat-
ter and to seek to remodel their cur-
riculum with the idea of making it
more thorough and broader in scope.
In the literary college there is like-
wise everywhere an appreciation of
the needs and difficulties of the sit-
uation, and already the machinery
has been set in motion to meet it.
Suggestions Offered
"Yet a general discussion will sure-
ly be of advantage. In what follows
I offer for consideration suggestions
which have reached me.
(Continued on Page Five)
JOSEF HOFMAN, PROTEGE OF
RUBINSTEIN, TO GIVE CONCERT
Josef Hofman, Rubinstein's famous
protege will give a concert Feb. 10, in
Hill auditorium. This season's con-
certs have taken Mr. Hofman through-
out the middle east and middle west
and the Pacific coast.

Speaking before an audience that
thronged the Natural Science auditor-
ium, Dean Charles H. Haskins uf the
Harvard Graduate school yesterday
afternoon told of the work of "The
Peace Conference," in . which, as a
member of two of its commissions, he
had an active part.
Professor Haskins termed the
League of Nations "the great piece of
constructive work of the future" and
said that some form of international
organization had become a necessity
because the common life of the world
had outgrown its political organ~iza-
tion. He stated that the League was
required to fix the state of world af-
fahi'
League Will Be Amended
"The League of Nations is not a
final document," he concluded. "It
will undoubtedly have to be amended.
However, it looks more to the future
than to the past."
At the beginning of his address, Dr.
Haskins discussed the difficulties un-
der which the Conference was held,
resulting mainly from the fact that its
members had frequently to turn from
their more technical problems to pro-
vide for feeding the people and the
conditions of anarchy that existed in
Russia and other countries.
Nations Freed by Treaty
The lecturer pointed out that the ar-
ticles of the peace treaty called for
the liberation of many nations that
Germany had conquered, and -also
bound her to maintain peace. The
latter was accomplished by taking
away, the Teuton's navy, reducing her
formerly vast military organization to
200,000 men, demolishing her fortress-
es, and setting up Allied guards for
10 years in her territory to prevent
future outbreaks.
Speaking of the reparation terms de-
manded of Germany, which amounted
to a loss of 16 per cent of her terri-
tory and vast economic losses due to
relinquishment of iron, potash, and
(Continued on Page Six)
FOOT TROUBLES
TO BE DISCUSSED
"Foot Efficiency" will be the subject
of a talk to be given by Dr. S. R.
Thompson of Chicago at 7:45 &'clock
this evening in room 316 of the Union.]
The entire University public is invited
to attend.
Dr. Thompson, v;ho is a specialist
on foot troubles, will illustrate his talk
with motion pictures. He is a strong
advocate of correct walking, and he
impresses its value by means of
slides.
During the war Dr. Thompson serv-
ed in the army as a member of the
board that designed shoes for soldie'rs.

the plan suggested would tend to
make such the case here.
Plan Outlines Presentation Exercises
As outlined, the plan calls for pre-
sentation to be held in the spring out
doors. The steps of the Library have
been mentioned as a suitable place, as
there is space here for a large por-
tion of the student body to gather and
witness the awarding of the letters.
It is believed that were this plan
carried out, and if the affair were ac-
companied by a campus sing, the "M"
would have a greater 'meaning than it
does at present, and athletes would
be more likely to wear them on the
campus.
Seniors to Win Blankets
~Johnson also believes that the pre-
sentation of blankets would be an ad-
ed incentive to athletes. These blan-
kets wbuld be presented to seniors
who had completed their competition.
Had a. man competed in more than
one sport and won his letter, the
blanket would carry the special "M"
designed for each sport, and beneath
the letter there would be a star for
each year it had been won. Blankets
would be presented at the same cere-
mony at which letters were given out.
WESSINBER SEES END
TO INFLUENZA SCARE
EPIDEMIC WILL CEASE WITHIN
WEEk, SAYS HEALTH
OFFICER
"In a few days, we will be through
with the influenza scare, I believe,"
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health , of-
ficer, said yesterday afternoon. "It
will not continue longer than a week1
in my opinion. During the past week'
only one case of -pneumonia has been
reported outside of the hospital, which
in itself tells the story."
-2 Flu Cases Reported
Dr. Wessinger stated that 25 influ-
enza patients had been reported dur-
ing the previous 24 hours, some of
whom were not even confined. "The
attacks were exceedingly mild with
few exceptions," he said.
No pneumonia deaths have occurred
in Ann Arbor except at the hospital
where two or three patients, who had
been operated on for other diseases,
died as a result of complications.
Forsythe Discusses Disease
Dr. Warren E. .Forsythe of the Uni-
versity Heat~h service, spoke before
representatives of various house clubs,
fraternities, sororities, and other or-
ganizations Tuesday"noon in the Na-
tural Science auditorium.' He dis-
cussed the care of influenza patients
and means of preventing the spread
of the disease.
"We know of no good preventatives
yet," the doctor stated, "and the only
thing that can be done is to take pro-
per care of the patient. Influenza is,
not contagious - unless some one.
coughs in another's face, yet it is ad-
visable to stay away from the sick
room as much as possible."
All medical classes in the hospital
have been discontinued because of the
influenza. This includes all senior
classes and most of the junior ones..
Those that are held in the Medical
building are being conducted as us-
ual.
BIG TURNOUT FEATURES
SAGINAW CLUB SMOKER

COACH YOST
PLANS FOR
FOOTBALL'

I

MENTOR HERE TO INVEI
ELIGIBILITY OF VARSI'
MEN
SPRING TRAINING W
START EARLY IN A
Confers with Athletle Offieials
nation; Expects Big Sq
to Report
Coach Fielding H. Yost, whi
pectedly arrived Tuesday mor
Ann Arbor, will lay plans for
training and he will look in
eligibility of men, whom he exj
develop into Varsity materia
fall. Hedwill remain in thee
several days.
The Michigan Mentor spent
conferring with athletic offic
the situation for next fall, an
oughly went over all matte:
looked around-the campus, and
with prospective-candidates :
1920 team.
To Start Practice In Ar
Concerning the spring
Coach Yost said, "'the weath
mitting, I will start football V
this Airil, immediately after
vacation. In this drill I 9xpee
custom all new material to m
ods so that there will be no d
this next fall. The men, w(
up well in the preliminary p
will no doubt be invited to th
practice next fall."
Refuses to Predict
* With the excellent material,
he has bn hand, both from this
squad, the ineligible list, at
freshman squad, Michigan sup
.lodk for Yost to develop a gre
en. As usual "Hurry-Up" is t
timistic, refusing to make an
casts as to what the Wolverin
do in the fall.
r
HaskinsFavtor
L " am for the League even
promise is necessary, but I am
ed to its rejection or to the
ance of the Lodge reservationi
the statement made by Dean I
H. Haskins of Harvard uni
when interrogated by a Daily r
on his attitude towards the Lei
Nations' covenant. "The ony
I ask is that, we should acc
League at once."
Dr. Haskins, who is dean
Harvard Graduate school, sere
Important commissions in Fr
connection with the formula
the articles of the peace treat
was a member of a commis
three, which investigated the
tions that should determine ti
posal of the Saar valley, and
suggestions *ere acted on 1
committee of four, consisting o
ident Wilson, David Lloyd I
Premier Clemenceau, and P
Orlando. He was also a men
a commission of two which invi
ed Belgium and Danish affairs
SPHINX AND TRIANGLE M
TO EFFECT UNDERSTA:

II

Demotion from lieutenant colonels
to captains has come to Capt. John P.
Lucas , and Capt. Robert Arthur
through' receipt of orders from the war
department. Exchanges from various
colleges show that this is nothing un-
usual, as demotion has come to prac-
tically all professors of military sci-
ence and tactics in different colleges
and universities.
Restored to Old Rank
"The rank of lieutenant colonel,
which both Captain Arthur and my-
self held, was purely an emergency
one held during the period of the
war," declared Captain Lucas yester-
day. "This move of demotion is far
reaching in restoring the rank held
before the war to those, who during
its action, received a higher rank of
an emergency nature. The move is
not unexpected."
Captain Arthur reverts from his
emergency rank of. lieutenant colonel
of field artillery to that of captain of
coast artillery. Captain Lucas as-
sumes his previous rank of captain of
cavalry instead of his emergency one
as lieutenant colonel l in the signal
corps.
rloth Men Serve Overseas
Both men have served overseas, Cap-
(Continued on Page Sig)

More than 50 students attended the
Saginaw club smoker Tuesday night
in the Union. The big spring party
or spring sprout, as it is called, was'
discussed at length, and it is planned
to make this the biggest event of its
kind ever held in Saginaw. During
the Christmas vacation the Saginaw
club co-operated with the alumni of
the two Saginaw high schools in an
endeavor to bring promising men to
the University.

In an effort to create a b
derstanding between the jun
ary and engineering classes
junior literaryhonorary soc
Triangle, junior honorary en
society, will give a get-togeth
at the Union at 6:15 tonigh
The dinner is to be the I
series of monthly get-togethe
two societies. Prof. R. M. We
talk. Dunbar Longnecker, '2
be chairman.

-_

TO-

NITE

Comedy Club 's
"ALICE SITBY=THE-FIRE"
Directed by Professor J. Raleigh Nelson '.

If,

Seats at Graham's until 5:30; after 5:30 at Whitney Box Office

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