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January 25, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t Has Fersonality,
iota Registrar; urton
Intercollegiate Athletics

to a request from The
ar E. B. Pierce of the
Minnesota has written

of

following article which gives
interesting personal news con-
n'g Michigan's President-elect,
n L. Burton.
ie Students of the University'of
:higan:
i have asked me to tell you what
link about President M. L. Buir-
My first impulse is to tell you
we think about his leaving
esota,h but 4nything that I might
>n that subject would not make
cheerful reading, so I shall try
Ick to the text.
those who have not seen Presi-
Burton, let me say that he is a
le person, six feet two inches
ind proportionately built, weigh-
00 pounds. One is not conscious
s bigness, however, until one sees
alongside other men. President
itus Cyrus Northrup was never
dered a small -man; however,
President Vincent came, we no-
with surprise how he loomed
a President Northrop. When Mr.
>n was introduced to us as Mr.
nt's successor, again we were
ed to see how the new president
ed above his predecessorp. Yes,
dent Burton is a large man, well
ip, active, virile, of pleasing ap-
.nce, and red-headed. A stock
idrum, much overworked during
rst year here, is "Why is Presi-
Burton like a piano?" and the
er to it is, "Because he is grand,
ht, and square, and has a ma-
iy top."' His air is not fiery
but a becoming auburn. I don't
whether Burton would , be
I handsome or not. I do know
ver, that he looks mighty good
is quite impossible for any one
innesota to analyse Mr. Burton
letely, for he has been here only
short years. The first year e
"studying ihe situation at Min
a; the second year was the pe-
f. the 'S. A. T. C., which doesn't
t (Mr." Burton =w ~'t' agree with
) and in the third year he was
L from us. Yet despite this all
hort period of service, certain
tteristics appear clearly definite-
have impressed themselves upon
Jniversity."
st of all, Mr. Burton is out and
. students' president. That was
almost from the beginning. I.
nber. his saying in one of his
addresses, "I am interested in
ing what the alumni are think-
I am interested in knowing the
of the faculty, but I am pro-
1ly concerned to know what the
nts are thinking about." 'Hiss
quent policies were fully consis-
with this statement. President
n sincerely covets contact with
tudents. He likes to mingle with
much as a big brother ould,
o boss the proceedings but- to
their comradeship. He, enters
ily into the problems of the stu-
is wonderfully expert in catch-
heir point of view, and,) having
it it, is so peculiarly able- to
lize for them the ultimate goal
eir strivings that presently the
e student body has caught the

vision of a finer college spirit, a clean-'
er campus, and a better Minnesota
in every way.
In the past we have heard lots of
talk about student self-government,
but during the last three years there
has been among the student body a
larged interest in the welfare of the
University, a more spontaneous con-
cern for the good name of the insti-
tution than ever before, and all this
without much talk or conscious m-
chinery. I knew the students love
President Burton. They like to have
him around. They respect him, and
admire him, and they are proud of
him.
President Birton is a firm advo-
cate of intercollegiate athletics. He
is athletic himself and enjoys all
sports. He never misses an intercol-
legiate football or basketball game,
unless he is away; he plays a good
game of tennis, is an enthusiastic
golfer, and thoroughly enjoys the out
of doors. I have never seen him ap-
pear weary. Always about him there
is an enthusiasm that is contagious.
His presence inspires activity. It is
utterly impossible for him to be an
indifferent spectator at a contest. He
is too red-blooded and human for that.
He always wants his side to win and
cordially lends his efforts toward toe
winning.
The faculty were, I think a little
doubtful about President Burton at
first. They thought that in some of
the things he said he showed too much
egotism. Mr. Burton did make a
number of promises and did assert
that he intended to do certain things,
all which may. hae sounded egotis-
tical but to the wonder as well as
to the satisfaction- of his critics he
accomplished in every instance :just
what he had said he would. I think
that this trait of his still creates sur-
prise. He has a most astounding fac-
ulty for carrying out his program re-
gardless of apparently insurmount-
able obstactes. He is tactful and dip-
lotnatic. He appreciates, the efforts
of others and doesn't hesitate to ex-
press that appreciation.He takes the
entire faculty into his confidence. He
has frequently called a mass meeting
of the teaching staff to set before them
the problems of 'the University, so
that all 'might 'understand thoroughly
the plans of the administration, par-
ticipate in their formulation, and
lend hearty co-operation in their ful-
fillment..
Presi'dent Burton has been wonder-
fully successful in presenting tne
needs of the University to the legisla-
ture. Practicilly alone in insisting
that "what ought to be done must be
done," he carried through success-
fully by all odds the biggest and most
far-reaching program for expansion in
the history of the institution. It was
not fighting methods that won the ap-
propriations from the legislators.
There was not ever a suggestion of
friction. It Was the overwhelming
conviction of a big leader, forcefully
expressed, that won the sympathetic
and cordial support of the individual
members of the legislative body fr
the (state's institution of higher learn-
ing. President Burton takes consid-
erable time in determining what is the
best thing to do, but once he has

made up his mind, he allows nothing
to interfere with the accomplishment
of his purpose. Nature knew has bus-
iness when she gave him that crown
of auburn.
President Burton is thoroughly hu-
man. His ,laugh is a whole-squled,
deep-rooted chuckle that shakes him
all over. He enjoys a joke and a
good story. He is full of appropriate
short stories and witticisms that
takes the tenseness out of over-
weighty conferences. One instantly
feels at ease in his presence. His
cordial good will and sympathetic at-
tention command instant and lashing
loyalty. He reminds one of Lincoln.
He honestly and sincerely likes folks
and always wants to have folks like
him. In this h* has succeeded won-
derfully at Minnesota.
The announcement of President
Burton's resignation brought a uni-
versal sense of loss among students
,nd faculty. We haven't yet quite
fully realized that he is going and
we don't like to think about it. We
congratulate the students and faculty
of t'he University of, Michigan upon
the acquisition of a splendid friend
and leader whom we relinquish with
genuine sorrow. It will be exceeding-
ly hard for a new man to fill the place
President Burton has won in the
hearts of the students and the facul-
ties of Minnesota.

V

SCHOOL OF
DANCING
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I 780-W
STUDIO PHONE '
1;422-J

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II

1'

Hearst' s

Magazine-a Liberal.

Education

BURIED TREASURE
BY F. Britten Austin, Hearst's for December

Hearst's Magazine for1920
HALL CAINE
INCE the end of the war released Sir Hall Caine
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Is Trinity Church
A Squatter?
Does the richest Protestant
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own its valuable real estate?
Should not this question be
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See Hearst's for December.

IN THE CYPRESS SWAMP
By Robert WChambers, Hearst'afor December
Armnies Too Big
To Fight
Will the Nations disarm?
Can the League of Nations
effect this? Ferrero, the i
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In Hearet's for December.
WHY I DON'T GO TO NEW YORK
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I-'
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The Little Things
That Count
Many marriages are unhap-
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Read "The Little Things
That Count," by Pertwee.
In Hearst's for December.

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