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January 24, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-24

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ASSOCIATEL
PRESS
DAY AID N(MT 1I
SERVICE

..

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1920.

PRICE THREE

p { 1.41 V ... .L Y11L L'i2L .
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IT LOOMS IN
NKS OF PARTIY
1ER PACT FIGHT
LICAN SENATORS GIVE
rY NEGOTIATIONS SEVERE
SETBACK -
VER ULTIMATUM ON
'OSED COMPROMISE
4oloi1s Headed by Johnson of
lifornia, Object to. Letting
Up On Stand
(By Associated Press)
ington, Jan. 23.-Protest by a
roup of influential Republican
s against further compromises
rvations to the peace treaty to-
e the compromise negotiations
'e setback and senators de-
involved further- solidarity of
ublican party not only in the
ut in the nation.
Present Ultimatum
Republican senators headed
ators Johnson of California,
ah of Idaho, and claiming to
it other senators, called Re-
z Leader Lodge into confer-
d delivered. What was declar-
an ultimatum against proposed

COUZENS PRESENTS
$300 TO DEBAT4RS
Second Tryouts for Mid-West Debate
to Be Held This Morlilng
James 'Couzens, mayor of Detroit,
has given $300 to Michigan's Cen-
tral debating league team in the form
of $50 testimonials to each of the six
members of the two teams. Mayor
Couzens has made it his practice to
show his interest in public speaking
in this way, having made this gift
three times.
It is probable that the Alger med-
als which have not yet been obtain-
sd, will be awarded within a month,
according to Prof. Thomas Trueblood
of the oratory department.
The second tryouts for the Mid-
West debating squad is to take plaice
-t 8 o'clock this morningin room 3021
Mason hall. As the speeches at the
first elimination were given in alpha-
betical order, they will be given in
the reverse order this morning. At the
present time there are 16 persons on
the squad. Four will be eliminated
today.I

_ __ 1.

I

FOLOWING PLOT
Eighty-Five Communists Alleged to
Have Planned Overthrow iof Gov-
ernment by Violence
SOCIALISTS WILL RAISE
FUND FOR OUSTED SOLONS

t

DUTCH REFUSE TO GIVE UP KAISER;
NATIONAL HONOR PROHIBITS, CLAIM
Reply to Allies Handed Officials Says she is not a party, is learned here.
Holland Not Bound By Treaty Neither the Dutch constitution nor tra-

r S _.

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Jan. 23.-Eighty-five mem-
bers of the Communist party were in-
dicted today by the special grand jury
probing radical activities. Most prom-
inent among them is Mrs. Rose Pas-
tor Stokes, said to be a member of the
national executive committee of the
organization. The grand jury Wednes-
day indicted 38 officials of the Com-
munist labor party.
Alleged Conspiracy
The eighty-five indicted are named
in one genemal conspiracy indictment
charging them with advocating over-
throw of the government by violence.
All but three are named in additional
indictments charging violation of the
Illinois sedition law..

r

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 23.--The Dutch minister
delivered Holland's reply to the allied
demand for extradition of the former
German Emperor to the foreign office
at 5:30 p. m.
Holland's reply to the entante de-
mands for the extradition of Emper-
or William declares that she cannot
be bound by the peace treaty to which
FINAPERA TRYTOUTS
WILL BE HELD TODAY
NUMEROUS POSITIONS STILL OPEN'
FOR PROMISING,
MATERIAL

URGE CAUTION TO CHECK
SPREAD OFINFLUENZA
HEALTH SERVICE REPORTS FEW
MORE CASES; EPIDEMIC
POSSIBILITY

dition permit of her acceeding to the
demand of allied powers.
The national honor the reply de-
clares does not permit the betrayal
of the confidence of those who en-
trust themselves to Holland and her
free institutions.

CALIFORNIAl 'NINE
TO PLAY VAR5ITY
HEREONMAY2
BARTEL3IE CONFIRMS RITMOl
ABOUT BASEBALL
GAME

me of the senators in the confer-
with, Senator Lodge declared that
reception of the protests would
:t the Republican leadership and
y in the senate while one; Senator
man of Illinois, stated that he
d leave the Republican party and
. a third party if the Republican,
ort "emasculated reservations."
Prevents Meeting
.e conference with Senator Lodge
h lasted nearly three hours pre-
ed the scheduled sessiongof the bi-
san committee. This committee
meet again tomorrow but with
compromise prospects thrown in
usion by today's developments
mocratic interested in the com-
Lise reservations tonight express-
oncern over the turn of events
it the resultant possibility of suc-
4IDY CLUB SEAT
SALE1STATS TODAY

Slightly more serious is the aspect
which the possibility of an epidemic
of influenza now presents, according
to Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of the University Health service, in a
statement which he made yesterday.
While there is no marked increase in
the number of cases reported, yet it
is the belief of the Health service
that no surprise would be expressed
were an epidemic of the disease to
spread,-
According to Dr. Forsythe there are
some half dozen of influenza cases
among students which are of a se-
rious nature and others more mild in
effect. "While there is no desire to
create undue alarm or anxtey," said
Dr. Forsythe, "yet we believe that'
warning should be given all students
to co-operate with us in eliminating
the possibility of an epidemic."
F Urge Precaution
For this purpose Health service au-
thorities urge that great attention be
ziven the patient immediately any' ill
effects are noted. They advise that
he go right to bed and stay there, even
4f it necessitates the missing of class
work. According to them it is always
advisable to secure a doctor as soon
as possible.

New York, .Jan. 23.-Leading social-
ists meeting today at the' Rand School
of Social Science completed plans for
a four day drive commencing Jan. 27,
to raise $20,000 for the defense of the
five members of their party suspend-
ed by the state assembly and being
tried at Albany on charges of disloy-
alty Plans call for street corner
collections with mass meetings in va-
rious parts of the city.
Senators to Speak
The chief gathering will be in lad-
ison Square garden on Jan. 28, when
it was announced three United States
senators would speak. Their names
were not made public.
Announcement of plans for a de-
fense fund followed a statement in
Albany yesterday by socialist coun-
sel that any delay-in the trial -would
work financial hardship to their plans
whereas the prosecution had the re-
sources of the state on which to rely.
ORGANIZATIONS TO DRAW
FOR HOP BOOTHS TODAY

Today ends the competition for
Union opera positions. From 2 until
5:30 o'clock men will be given an
opportunity to try out before E. Mor-
timer Shuter, director, and Earl Moore,
musical director.
No other trials will be offered the
stidents, states Mr. Shuter, who also
says that there is still great opportu-
nity for any one with ability. Al-
though close to 400 have turned out
for the cast and chorus, most of
whom have displayed talent, a number
of good positions are yet unfilled.
Competition has been unusually keen
this year, according to the manage-
ment, and an unusual amount of good
material has been discovered. This
year's opera affords excellent chances
for dancers and singers, and Mr.
Shuter says that he has been success-
ful in filling most of the places with
capable men.
Plans for the spring trip are being
made by Homer Heath, general man-
ager of the Union. As yet the towns
to be played in have,,not been defi-
nitely chosen, but Union officials ex-
pect the opera to cover as much if
not more territory than last year.
PRoF$ RICHARD GRINER,
ENDS BRILLIANT CAREER AS STU-
DENT OF AFRICAN
ANIMALS

r
i
t

London, Jan. 23.-A dispatch from the
plague today reporting the Dutch gov-
ernment's reply to the allied note
demanding extradition of former Em-
peror William of Germany declared
the former kaiser can not be surrend-
ered to a third party except by request
of the German government.-
The foreign office is convinced that
the Dutch refusal will involve long
diplomatic exchanges.
The Manchester Guardian under-
stands that Holland indicates indi-
retty that there is a possibility the
former Emperor may be extradited at
a call from the League of Nations if
the tribunal which is to try him is
really international. Otherwise, ac-
cording to this newspaper, Holland
would refuse.
LEVITSKI GRHEETED BY
EXCEPTIONL PPLAUSE
C1ARACTERISTICS OF RUSSIAN
AND AMERICAN INTER.
WOV N

/

DAILY PLANS TO PUBLISH
LISTS IN HOP
EXTRA

BERKELEY TEAM CALI
STRONGEST ON zpl
Golden Gate Team Schedules S
teen Contests for Eastern
Invasion

}

BOOTH I

TO BE FOURTH
'S WORKS, BY
AAIZATION.

OF

J-HOP LISTS WANTED

Reserved seat tickets for "Alice-Sit-
3y-The-Fire," the Barrie drama to be
resented on Wednesday night at the
Vhitney theater by the Comedy club,
vill go on sale at 9 o'clock this morn-
ng at Graham's bookstore. Reserva-
ions may be made there at any time
efore 5:30 o'clo'k Wednesday, when
he sale will be transferred to the box
fice of the Whitney.
Ne'W Method of Disposal
The policy adopted this year by the
lub in the disposition of the tickets
Jffers radically from that heretofore
mpoyed, as tickets have 'always been
old about the campus and reserva-
ons made after purchase. The in-
onvenience of such practice led to the
hanged methods.
David D. Nash, '20, is chairman of
ie committee on sale of tickets, and
ill be assisted in his work by Frank
uechner, '21, and Walter Riess, '21L.
Successful Play
Wednesday night's performance
arks the fourth production by the
omedy club of a play by James M.
arrie. "Alice-Sit-By-The-Fire" en-
yed its first success in New York
t the Empire theater, where Ethel
arrymore appeared in the leading
>le. Since that time the drama has,
een made popular throughout the
>untry by the road company starring
oselle Knott, Irnest Truex, Vivian
artin, and Fred Truesdale. As a
ehicle for stock companies the play1
is been extensively used.
Beg Your Pardon
An article in yesterday morning's,
sue of The Daily concerning an in-
rview with Prof. David Friday of
e economics department gave the er-
neous impression that Charles
vans Hughes was a socialist mem-
r of the New York state legislature.

Attention has been recently called
to certain rules, the observance of
which aid toward avoiding the spread-
ing of the disease. Dr. Forsythe men-
tioned them again, paying particular
attention to the first, that of strictly
aviding the use of improperly ster-
ilized eating and drinking, utensils. He
said that experience had proved that
infection caused through the using of
a patient's dishes, cups, etc., by an-
other not infected -to be the most vir-
ulent source, of contamination.
Rospital Excludes- All BRut Flu Cases
According to additional information
secured yesterday, the University
hospital has shut its doors to any
more patients save those who are be-
ing treated for influenza. There are
about 50 cases registered already,
among which are some of a serious
nature.
Dr. Forsythe said that it would be
the policy of the Health service to
keep any students who may become
infected isolated in their respective
rooms rather than bunch them all to-
gether in the hospital.
The Health service urges that all
cases of illness be reported for im-
mediate treatment and asks the co-,
operation of the student body; in the
matter.

Lists of girls who will attend
the coming J-Hop are wanted by
The Daily as soon as possible.
The lists which will appear in
the J-Hop extra should give the
girls' names, together with the
cities from where they come and
the number of the booth where
they will be during the Hop.
This applies to independents as
well as fraternity men.
The lists should be addressed
to Hugh W. Hitchcock at The
Daily office, Press building.-
Booths for the 1921 Hop will be
drawn at 1:30 this afternoon in the
Union. It is essential that all or-
ganizations who intend to secure
booths have representatives present'
at this time.
The charge of $25 for the booths is
payable at the (time of drawing as
well as the fee of $5 for the decora-
tion of them. Although the commit-
tee does not require that any organi-
zation decorate they feel, that it is
highly desirable that this be done in
order that the entire scheme of dec-
oration may be carried out.' No indi-
vidual decoration will be allowed this
year.
At the meeting last night in the
Union, all independents who are to
attend the Hop and all who did not
expect to be in any organization booth
were organized into two booths. It is
desired that all who were present or,
represented at this meeting commu-
nicate with R.' Dillon, '21, chairman
of the Hop, as soon as possible.
Special Program in Tap Room Tonight
Two pianos and a novelty act will
feature in the special program to be
given this evening in the Union tap
room. E. S. Larson, '20, is in charge

(By Associated Press-)
Chattanooga, Tenn., Jan. 23.-Prof.
Richard L. Griner, African explorer
and scientist, died at a hospital here
last night.
Professor Griner spent 30 years in

(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Ann Arbor concert enthusiasts sel-
d'dm pay homage to an artist by stand-
ing at the conclusion of a program
and applauding until he favors them
with innumerable reappearances and
encores, but that is what happened
to Mischa Levitski when he played
last night before 0Iill auditorium's
usual rather conservative audience.
It is surely gratifying to know that1
the pianistic field can also boast of a
first class musician of the younger
generation as well as that of the vio.
linists. American freedom, spontanie-
ty, and democracy, are interwoven with
the inherent reserve, intensity,' rand
subdued emotion of the Russian in
the, personality and playing of the
22 year old Russo-American.
Has Singing Quality
There is a singing .quality that is
unusual in his playing that stamps
.him as an individualist. He is able
to command the most powerful of for-
tissimos and still preserve the theme
without losing it in a maze of sound
termed noise; that is a fault so prev-
-alent among his contemporaries.
\is technique both on the keyboard
and with the pedal are noticeable
qualities, of his unquestionable mu-
sicianship. Levitski 'has a rather re-
grettable habit, however, of always
preceding his numbers with superflu-
ous improvisations that invariably end
in promiscuous trebles.
Continually Delicate
The program opened with the bold
and pretentious "Organ Toccata and
.Fugue in D minor" of Bach-Tausig's
followed by the "D minor Melody" of
Gluck Sgambati with its dreamy, vel-
vety, softnesses. Levitski preserved
the trend of thought by bridging over
the movements of Beethoven's "Sona-.
ta Appassionata". with sustained fin-
al tones, thus keeping the continuity
of the delicate trills that melted into
(Continued on Page Six)'
REV. F. F. PETERSON
TO SPEAK SUNDAY

Confirmation ''of rumors prevale
for some time that the University
California baseball team would me
the Michigan Varsity some time th
spring was made in an announceme
issued yesterday by Athletic Direct
P. 0. Bartelme that the game w
assured for May ,25 at Ferry field.
wire was received yesterday closin
the agreement.
The California team will lea
Berkeley about May 12 and will pla
Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Kansas, Ml
souri, Illinois, Chicago, Northwes
ern, Michigan, Cornell, Syracuse, Ha
yard, Dartmouth, Yale, Columbi
Princeton, finishing at Pennsylvan
about June 12.
This is thefirst time thata Ca:
.ornla team has invaded the East, a
though they have been represented
the intercollegiate track meets. A
cording to advices received from the
athletic director, the ball team ha
been the leading intercollegiate nii
on the Pacific coast for several year
and the 1920 team promises to equ
:the record of its predecessors.
Athletic Directors Meet Today
The board of directors of the Athle
ic association will meet at 3 o'clo(
this afternoon' in the athletic offie
1he new method of electing manager
for the athletic teams as formulate
by the Student council will be acte
upon, and the report of the committe
appointed to codify the by'laws
the association will be read:
Representatives of the "M" clu
<and 'the University of Michigan clu
of Detroit, will address the candidate
for athletic teams at 11 o'clock Sui
day morning in the Union.
It is expected that they will discus
the athletic situation in general fron
the athlete's standpoint, and impreg
upon the men the necessity of keepin
up their scholastic work.
SHIP CAUIGHT ON ICE
ASKS AEROPLANE IM

travel in the French Congo and other
portions of South and Central Africa
studying the lives and habits of ani-
mals as a representative of the
Smithsonian institution of Washing-
ton, New York Zoological society and
other organizations for research for
natural history.
He attracted wide attention in 1905
when he announced that he was go-
ing to West Africa to study the means
of communication used by apes. He
made several trips in an effort to re-
duce the ape language to writing and
last May announced here that he had
found a monkey in the Congo that
talked to him..
.HOOVER NITS ON DEMAND,
Will Not Consider Presidential Cavi.
paign Unless Public Wants Him
New York, Jan. 23. - Julius H.
Barnes, president of the United States
Grain corporation who intimated in
a speech two weeks ago that Herbert
Hoover, former food administrator,
might be "drafted" to the presidency
announced in a statement today that
"there is no authority or sanction for
any organization work in the form ofa
Hoover. clubs or other similar organ-
ized effort.
"There is not a dollar of campaign
fund and Mr. Hoover will not per-
mit his friends to organize sentiment
on his behalf. I do not believe he will,
permit himself to become a candi-3
date unless there is unmistakable ev-
idence of spontaneous and popularl
demand for him."

TWO MEMBERS OF CREW RISK
LIVES IN SUMMONING
HELP
Chicago, Jan. 23.--Officials of the
Great Lakes life saving station here
appealed today to the Naval training
,station to send a hydroplane to the re-
lief of the crew of the lal e steamer
.Sydney 0. Neff, imprisoned by the ice
six miles off the Chicago harbor.
STwo imembers of the crew made
their way over precarious footing af-
forded by fio#ting cakes of ice to the
four mile crib.
Ice Squeezing Ship
They said the ice was slowly squeez-
ing in and the boat might be crush-
ed.
The vessel already had -been raised
four feet above the water line it show.
ed when imprisoned Monday night,
they,. reported.
The life saving officials said there
was open water near tlie boat where
a hydroplane could "light."
Will Try Flight
An attempt will be made to remove
the members of the crew by use of the
hydroplane, they said. -Two could be
carried each trip.
The wind will have to shift, blow-
ing the ice cakes off shore before the
vessel can be freed.
STUDENTS INVITED TO HEAR
JANE ADDAMS TOMORROW

Detroit, Jan. 23.-Seven hundred six-
ty new influenza cases were reported
to the health' officer here today, b'ring-
ing the total to 1,523. One death from
influenza was recorded and there
were 13 from pneumonia.
Cards May Be 'Filed by Noon Today
Any student in the literary college
who failed to file his classification
cards because of any unavoidable de-
'lay such as Anability to consult with
professors, wilJ not have to pay the
extra fee of $1, if their cards are filed
before this noon.

Rev. F. F. Peterson, of Boston, isI
to be here Sunday and Monday to aidI
in increasing the effectiveness of re-
1ligious education. The Y. M. C. A.,
and Y. W. C. A., in co-operation with
Rev. J. M. Wells of the Baptist
church, have asked Rev. Peterson's
assistance in the hope that his sug-
gestions will prove beneficial to all
churches.
"Success in Religious Education"
will be his subject at 10:30 o'clock
Sunday morning, and he will talk on
"A Better Crop of Boys and Girls" at
6:30 o'clock in the evening at the
Baptist church.
All pastors, student pastors, Sunday
school superintendents, and teachers
are invited to lunch with him Monday
noon at Lane hall, and overyone inter-
ested in Sunday school work may hear
him at 7:30 Monday evening in Lane
hall.

The Women's league invites stude2
and all others interested to Jane
dams' lecture at 7:30 o'clock Sun
evening in Hill auditorium. Th
will be no charge. Miss Adda:
subject will be "Women and Thy
Relation to Immediate Problems
+h0 ndv_

of the arrangements.

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