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January 23, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-23

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'I

itr au

xilx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
)AT AND NIGHT WIlt
' 1sRYll CE

-1

_,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1920.

PRICE THREE i

PRCiHE

___________:_____

TENSE MOMENTS FEATURE HEARING OF SOCIALISTS
Counsel for Defense Threatens tO Jng partly as evidence, partly for
Quit Case Because of Evidence identification the following docu-

SONGS Of ORIENT
SUNG, INJAMOREE

IRITISKI IS AMERICAN

Artist Wh Plays Tonight
Piano Study at Six

Began

"uu

ED

RTESJ
ermans
of

(By Associated Press)
Albany, Jan. 22.---There were tense
moments today at the trial of the five
suspended Socialist assemblymen when
it seemed that defendants and coun-
sel would "walk out"s on the assem-
bly judiciary committee.
Twice counsel for the defendants
threatened to quit the,,hearing during
the course of arguments on the admiss-
ability of evidence marked by person-
al exchanges between Morris Hill-
quit, chief defense counsel, and mem-
bers of the committee.
Despite objection of the Socialist
forces, committee counsel finally ob-
tained adjournment until next Tues-
day Ito-review evidence introduced to-
day. Seven witnesses were called,
includifng one agent of the department
of justice working for the joint leg-
islative committee investigating rad-
ical activities in this state, and com-
mittee counsel succeeded in introduc-

ment:
Constitution

d directed the
merican prop-
e Rio Grande
to documen-
fore the sef
stigating the

and by-laws of the na-I

Cosmiopolitan

wit .

Cl.'ub Actors

rting to show
highest Mex-
.e program of_
were carried
of "Clan of
late as June,
.ving encour-
those partici-
border towns
of testimony
rnment ofil-
"Plan of San

,;
'}
"
;

[

DRAMALE['SS THIRD
I PARTY IS NAUGHT
--STEPIIWN LEACOCK.
"Amy" in Comedy Club's Play "Ailce-
SIt-By-The-Fire" Supplies the
Essential
RESERVE SEAT TICKETS TO BE
PLACED ON SALE TOMORROW

tional, state and New York County
Socialist organization, a copy of a
Hebrew book written by Hall R.
Rogoff. and published by the Jew-
ish Socialist federation of New (York,
a pamphlet entitled "Bolsheism,"
written by Dr. B. Hoffman and pub-
lished by the Russian Association
Federation, a report of a speech in
New York by Assemblyman August
Claessens. a defendant, and court
records in the case of Scott Nearing
and the American Socialist society.
Prof. David Friday of the economics
department, when cjuestioned as to
his attitude on the expulsion of the
five socialists from the New York leg-
islature, one of whom was Charles
Evans Hughes, former governor of
New York and justice of the Supreme
Court of the United States, stated that
their actions are absolutely: assinine
and that he has no sympathy with
them. Professor Friday goes on to
say:
"I have been., opposed to that sort
of autocracy exercised by the mem-
bers of the New York legislature ever
since I arrived at the years of discre-
tion. .
"The very fact' that they are refus-
ing admittance to a delegation head-
ed by a former governor of the state
and a former justice of the Supreme
Court of the United States, shows
that the majority realize the weakness
of their position."
Dispatches from Yellow Republic Says
North and South Factions
Ready for Union
CANTON GOVERNMENT READT
TO GIVE UP INDEPENDENCE

Customs and. music of Pekin, South
American dances, prohibition laws of
the Sahara, and campus bolshevism
formed a few of the many unique sub-
jects offered at the All-Nation Jam-
boree given last night in Hill auditor-
ium. Music from many lands made up
a large part of the program, while
dancing and comic sketches completed
the bill.-
Portray Chinese Life
The entertainment was opened byl
"La Sorella" and "Hindu Rose" played
by the Girls' Glee club. "On the Road
to Pekin," an interesting little sketch
presented by the Chinese women of the
Univorsity, provided Chinese music
and a glimpse into the quaint street
life of Pekin. ^ ,
"The Desert Moon,",an oriental song
composed by K. Horillchi, '21E, was
sung by Rita Ireman, '21, who also
offered 'a dane number, "Sahara," to-
gether with J. M. Powers. The Amer-
icanized Chinaman's view of the Unit-
ed States was humorously set forth in
"Westernizing the East," a skit pre-
sented by S. Katsuizumi, Grad., and
S. Yonemoto, '21P.
Does Philippine Dance
"La Carinosa," a graceful Philippine
dance was given by R. Capishome,
'20L, and Yuki Asowa, 120. Jazz was
offered in plenty by Phil Diamond's
nine-piece orchestra and a novelty was
furnished by the 16 striking students
who, behind bushy beards, 'paraded
across the stage bearing signs of the
14 points for which they were striking.
The latter half of the program con-
sisted of "bos Gauchos," a song nuM-
ber, "The Joys of Love," danced by;
MIle. Kean'ette IXruszka, mandolin se-
lections by A. E. Elkind, 19, and a
travesty on prohibition entitled "His
(Continued on Page Eight)
NO MOECODSA
GAMES SYS BARTELME

Portray

Customs of Native Lands in
Annual Shot

PROCEEDS TO NE ADDED TO
'NATIONAL CONVENTION FUNDS

:untered
y sympa-,
ring the
drift to-

Mischa Levitski, the 22 year old
pianist who'plays at 8 o'clock thh
evening in Hill auditorium in the extra
concert series, is an American, al-
though he did happen to be born in a
town near Kieff in southern Russia.
His father had previously resided in
America and had become fully natural'
ized before returning to Russia.
His musical education began at six
when he was given a small violin,
for there was no piano in the home. A
friend of the family uAdertook to give
him piano lessons when he was seven
years old in secret. Soon afterward
the family again moved to America
where Levitski began his real study of
the piano under Sigismund Stojowski;
Later he studied with Ernest Dohnanyi
in Berlin and when still a boy in his
teens he came back to America where
he was hailed not as a prodigy but
,as a genius. His successes since then
have but deepened that impression.
The program will consist of 12 num-,
hers including the difficult Beethoven
sonata appassionata.

'
c
3
I
t
E
i

PRESIDENT HUTCHINS AND D
BATES REVIEW HISTORY
OF ORGANIZATION
CALL NEW BUILDING
"HOME OF STUDEN']
Two Orchestras, Varsity Quartette,
Soloists Ado to Success
of Get-Together

in

, was placed
g enough to
the director
as one of
i Eckhardt
ng the war.
b was to see
es from the
ihijitary af-

.n Diego,
into the

Texas, NeW Mexi-
Ina, and California
imultaneousiy witl
an and negro cif-
.can side. A sepa-
to be established
to Mexico request-
tes, contiguous to
p be carved out of
o be formne4 into a
der the protection'
to be accoTmplish-
ganner. All male
ag 16 years pf age
,self consisted of
?000,(H0 dditions
n4. 21.-Erectignpf
buildings tq the
al seminary, cost-
2,000,000 is tlie aim
tees, as annguced

(By P. A, S.)
"Without the inevitable 'third party,'
the modern drama is as naught!" de-
clared Stephen Leacock a few nights
ago in Hill auditorium.
And ready to back his statement to
the last trench, stands Amy, the senti-
inehtal young lady who will appear at
the Whitney theater Wednesday night
I to demonstrate how easy it is to sup-
ly this "third party"-made to order-
i~n casehe does not appear of his own
volition.
If Amy had not crammed her head
s) full of evening clothes, secret clos-
ets, and clandestine meetings, per-
haps she would have realized that it
was possible for her mother to have
friends without becoming unconven-
tional. Besides, the appropriate oc-
cupation for any mother wak to quiet-
ly sit-by-the-fire and turn over the
responsibilities of the household to
heif eldest daughter. At least, so
thought Aiy and her bosom-friend
Genevra. And if Steve Rollo-but who
are all these people? Ah ha! The
secret's out!
)ate of Play, Jan. 28.
Comedy club presents "Alice-Sit-By-
the-Fire,'' by Sir J. M. Barrie at 8
o'clock next Wednesday evening, Jan.
28, at the Whitney theater. And Bar-
rie himself will be present-not in
flesh, of course, but after the ultra-
modern fashion of his countrymen.
Sirs Oliver Lodge and Conan Doyle-
in the spirit. For the spirit of the-
whimsical sponsor of Daisy Ashford
and her "Young Visitor," is promised
to hover in every line of the play.
Barrie roles are famous for the fin-
esse with which they must be acted
and directed. And it was with full'
cognizance of this fact that Michigan's
largest dramatic organization secured
(Continued on Page Eight)
ALL HOP TICKETS
HAVE FEEN MAILED
All tickets for the 1921 Egp have
been sent out, acpop4ing ' to Robert
McKean, '21, who has charge of the
ticket sale. Refun4s to persons who
dA not get the tickets applie4 for
will have been sent out tgqay. Mc-

(By Associated Press)
Honolulu, Jan. 22.-Unificatipn of
the North and South factions of China
is imminent,. according to cable ad-
vices received here today from Can-
ton via Shanghai by the Hn Man
Bo, a chinese language newspaper.
Ready for ieae
The dispatch reported that the rev-
olutionary government at Nankipg,
South China, had iWdicahed readiness
to establish peaceful relations with
North China and is about to declare
cancellation of its independence and
unite with the Peking government.
The division between North and,
So.ith China, while an outgrowth of
the political difference sogn after thel
creation of the . republic by the reyo,
lution of 1911, assumed a mgost defi-
nite form in May, 1918, Wheq the
Southerns, or Constitutionalists set
up Ian independent mnilitary gqyern
ment and parliament at Canton knownl
generally as the South or Nkhling
government..
Finances Brlpg Aet
Throughout 1918 desultory parti.g
occurred between the Nortb and
South. Inability of the Northern gav-
ernment to make headway and finan-
cial embarrassient of both parties
led to plans late il 1918 for a peae
conference at S0agghi ip Febrtary,
1919:
The meetings brok up in disgr -
ment and outbreaks gpcurred at times'
during the past ya. .
EX-MAJItNES Q 1ANIM CTAJ
W1L 4POPT CONSTITUTION

IWO YANKSDI;
CAPTURE 6GENERAL
Clash Between American and Russian
Troops, Reported, Gives Cos-
sacks Worst of Deal
FACTIONAL FIGHTING BREAKS
OUT AS U. S. TROOPS WITHDRAW
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 22.-Two Amer-
ican soldiers were killed and one sev-
erely wounded in a clash with a Russ-
ian detachment with General, Semen-
off's forces on Jan. 10, near Posulsa-
kaya, while five Russians were killed,
one wounded and 65 captured, includ-
ing one general and six other officers
who still are held.
In reporting the clash to the war de-
partment today Major General Graves
commanding the American eipedition
in Siberia, said the Russians in an
armoured car made an unprovoked
attack -on the Americans who were' in
a similar car.
Americans Capture Car
The Russian attack was repulsed
and the Americans then captured the
car and its occupants. General Graves
said he believes the incident could be;
peacefully adjusted with General Sem-
enoff, "who could not have been re-
sponsible."I

[BlAMES ,i'lXAN OF JANITORS FOR
CONDITION AT INDIANA
CONTVS
Tegarding admission to basketball
games, Athletic Director P. G. Bar-
telnie naltes the following state-
ment
"After it was announced that a or-
tame number would be admitted to
basketball games on tickets which
wed e received in exchange for cou-
pons, it seems -that some who held
tickets were turned away, and that
many experienced difliculty in secur-
ing admission to the Indiana game of
last $aturday,
Crowding Due to Mistke
' "The Athletic association regrets
this and assures holders of tickets for
the balance of the Conference games
that this will not re-occur. Janitors of
the Uniyersity, in entire good faith
but contrary to any understanding
which has previously existed, took
charge of the door and rigidly en-
forced a plan of their own of admit-
ting only in single file.
1in the games which follow, not only
will those holding tickets be admit-
te4 at the regular entrance at the
southwest end of the gymnasium but
the entrance at the northwest end will
be open for admission as well as exit.
The remaining five games will com-
mence at 7:30 and the two doors will
be open at 7.

"The Michigan Union has d
more than any other one influ
to put the University of Michiga
the map," stated President Harr
Hutchins, the first speaker at
membership dinner held last nigh
the assembly hall of the Union. "0
'universities are now following M
igan's example and are ,uniting t
alumni as we have done. The An
Ican University Union in Pa
France, .took as its ideals many
those of Michigan and is now e
paigning for a huge endowment f
to perpetuate its work among A
ican students in Europe."
Says Union Is Students' Hom
President Hutchins went on to
that the Union is the home of the
dents and that it should be tre
as such by the members. The ,
dents, he said, need more than
classroom work and the Union fu
this need of recreation and social
dulgence. In the 'beginning of
talk, President Hutchins recalled
own student days in the Univer
and showed how different it was t
from conditions of the present ti
Dean Bates Speaks
Hon. Edwin Denby, '96L, sched
as the alumni speaker, was unabl
be present. Dean Henry M. Bates
the Law school was the only ot
speaker of the\ evening. As
of .the originators of the Union M
ment, he discussed authoritatively
progression of the campaign for m
hers and a building from its in
cy. The first part of his speech v
given over to a history of the Un
in which he said, "The greatest c
paign among alumni ever condu
in America has resulted in the c
struction and equipment of the
est building in the world of its leiR
From a few class room meetings
1903, the campaign spread, he
lated, over all parts of this cour
and even into foreign fields.
"Greater drives are now being c
ducted in the East for endowno
funds but only among a limited ni
ber of wealthy alumni, on wh
shoulders the financial burden res
continued the dean. At this t
Dean Bates paid a tribute to Hoi
Heath, who he said was one of
most enthusiastic and untiring wc
ers in its early days of an al
unsurmountable problem. He el
(Continud on Page Eight)
EXHIBIT PASTELS
IN MEMORIAL HA
Pastel sketches from the crayor
.lames Scripps Booth of Pasad
Calif., are now on exhibit in Alu:
Menmorial hall. The pictures, wl
are made with a special type of c
on special prepared paper, inel
interior sketches in the artist's ho
views of California woodlands,^
several landscapes and architecti
drawings. Though the number
sketches is limited; and includes n
of his portrait studies, Mr. Boo
versatility of expression is cle
shown.
Mr. Booth, who is a native of M
igan, has until a few years ago, divi
his time between his art and nmech
cal work on automobile designs.
later work since making his hom
California has been entirely devote
sketching, the work shown here
that recently exhibited at the Det
Athletic club being among his mn
recent sketches.
Prof. Rufus to Address Volnt
Prof. Carl W. Rufus, of the asti
omy department, who was formeri
missionary in Corea, willspeak at

open meeting of the Student volunte
at 7:30 o'clock Saturday evening
Lane hall. His subject will be "'

Vladivostok, Jan. 2 ,- - Factional
fighting has broken out throughout
Siberia. American forces are with-
drawing from along the Suchan minel
railway and are reported to have been
engaged in skirmishes with Siberian
partisans.,
Preparing to Move
A detachment of Colonel Morrow'sI
regiment, which was preparing to
move out from the Baikal district, was
forced to intervene in factional dis-,
turbances on Jan. 12, according to al
report from the Czech staff.
The only Americana now remaining
in the danger zone, where disorders
are prevalent, are those belonging to
Colonel Morrow's regiment. Their ar-
rival here depends on railroad condi-
tions which daily are growizg worse,
WILL HOLD PROM
APR. 9 AT UNIONA
The 1920 Soph Prom will be held
April 9 at the Union according to the
announcement made by social com-
mittees of the sophomore lits and en-1
gineers, at a joint meeting held Wed-
nesday a'fternoon, Plans were also
made for a Sophomoro party, to be
conducted after the fashion of the
freshman mixers, from 2:30 to 5:30
o'clock Yeb. 23 in the Union.
Arrangements are now being made
for decorations and a 15-piece orches-.
tra for the Prom. The committeel
plans to make the Prom, which willl
be formal, a rival of the J-Hop, ac-
cording to Maynard Newton, '22, chair-.
man.' Dancing will continue from 9
to 2 o'clock. The grand march is to
be led by James D. Dow, '22E.
For the party to- be given Feb. 28
a limit of 450 single admissions has
been set. Punch and wafers will,)be
served.

CJANCE FOlI..
TO PAY )UES

last oppor-
f the senior
class dues.
in corridor
ill be open}
ock in the
to 4 o'clock

f the class is call-
versity ruling that
ast be paid before
dinloma will be is-

Kean also requests that q11 pOex's1 --Asks Students' Co-operation
who have tickets which they q -Ppt E -liarines UOw attending the Uni-1 "We would ask students not to crowd
want return them to bma, versity met in room 306 of the Mich- through the doorways and entrance
A meeting of all independents who igan Union Wednesday night and or- spaces between stands, for unneces-
expect to attend the Hop, and of all ganized. The following officers were sary crowding might prove to be dan-
persons who do not expect to be in elected: president, F. S. Franklin, gerous. Would also 4sk that each one
any organization booth, will be held '23; vice-president; A. C. Hirth, '23; occupy no more. seating space than is,
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the Union. secretary, P. W. Gordon, '22L; treas- necessary for comfort, for it was very
urer, F. M. Greenwood, '21; public vident at last Saturday's game that
South Haven Alumni May Organize ity, E. W. Batty, '22E. if this thought had occurred to all
South Haven alumni are planning The presaidemt was quthorize4 to many more might have been accom-
the formation of a University of Mich- appolpt a enaitutional committee to inodated in the stands.
igan club according to, a statement, be haded by t4e vice-president, Al ' Shprtly after the examinations,
made by Registrar 4rthg p. lall, Uirth, '23. Angther meeting will be tickets still remaining undistributed
who returned from there yesterdgy. hel4 ip the Union next Wednesday will be given out in the main corridor
Registrar Hall states that the ppose night, at which time the constitution of" University Hall. Watch The Daily
of the club is to. epcourage high school will be voted on and an official name for announcement on the date and
men to come to the University. for the club adopted. j manner of distribution.'"

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