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January 21, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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,It 1 #410,

a

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1920.

PROF. A. P. NEWTON
TO SPEAK TODAY
A. Percival Newton, professor of
imperial history in the University of
London, will lecture at 4:15 o'clock
today in the auditorium of the Natur-
al Science building on "The British
Empire. Professor Newton states
that his purpose for coming to this
BLS country is to interest American un-
iversities in sending advanced students
to Englishuniversities and to arrange
for sending English students here,

of

e '

ria.l,
oust-
loos-
h we
vored

also for the exchange of university'
professors.
Prof. Claude H. Van Taype of the
American history department, states
that Professor Newton is known by
most of the American scholars who
go to England for study, particularly
those who do any research work in the
British. archives. "He often times
goes out of his way to assist these for-
eig1i students," said Professor Van
Tyne. "He assists. them in every way
he can and a great debt is due him
by these scholars." Professor New-
ton is said to be an authority on his
subject and officials in charge of the
lecture hope that the students will
give him a good hearing.
KNOTY TO SPEAK AT
MEMBERSHIP DINNER
PRESIDENT H. B. HUTCHINS, AND
DEAN H. M. BATES ON
PROGRAM

tA Edwin Denby. '96L, of Detroit, has
n- been s, ured to speak at the Union
ig dinner for members at 6:15 o'clock
n' Thursday evening in 'the assembly hall
on the first floor of the new building.
Mr. Denby is one of the prominent
v- citizens of Detroit, being an attorney
there, and h is also well known
e throughout the state and is considered
a possible candi'date for governor on
a the Republican ticket. le has served
1- as a congressman from the Detroit
h district.
y During the late World War he en-
liTted as a private 'in the United
beStates marines and was discharged as
_ a major. He also served in the Span-
h- ish-Americans war. He was the prin-
as cipal speaker at the first meeting of
to the present season of the Detroit U
of M. club at the time of the M. A. C.
;ame.
he President Harry B. Hutchins and
ar Dean Henry M. Bates will be on the
y program with Mr. Denby. President
nt Hutchins speaking first, followed by
er Mr. Denby, while Dean Bates will con-
ae clude the program.

FLUTSREAS T
Epidemic Re u es Height in Chicago
with 2,514 Cases Reported
in Single Day
MALADY, IS MILD DECLARE
ARMY OFFICIALS, OF CASES
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Jan. 20.-The number of
new influenza cases in Chicago today
passed the high pint for any one day
of last year's epidemic. A total of
2,514 cases was reported to the board
of health today with 26 deaths. New
pneumonia cases numebered 297 with
57 fatalities. The greatest number of
influenza cases for a single day last
year was 2,400. Health Commissioner
Robertson said today that the peak
of the epidemic had been passed.
Penetrates to Army
Washington, Jan. 20.-Influenza has
become epidenic in several army
camps, particularly in the middle
west, Surgeon General Ireland an-
nounced today, and it has made its
appearance among American troops
in Germany.
While the disease is increasing
among the civilian population it has
not reached epidemic, form and Sur-
geon General Blue of the public
health service said today there was
nothing in the situation to cause
alarm.
The malady as it has appear d both
among soldiers and civilians Is of a
mild type and the resulting death
rate proportionately has been far be-
low that of the war time epidemic.
Situation in Control
Surgeon General Blue said the state
health authorities apparently had the
situation in hand wherever the dis-
ease had occurred.
The army camps infected are Grant,
Ft. Sheridan, Love Field, Texas and
the Great Lakes Naval station.
Jlanuary Gargoyle
AppearsToday
Showing no claws and w th malice
toward none, the. initial 1920 number
of the Gargoyle makes its bow to the
public today. While no offense, of
course, is intended to the "female of
the species," many amusing and Parth-
ian shots are directed their way..
Campus tppics in general are com-
mented upon and the rapidly ap-
proaching J-Hop provides material
for many of the drawings and jokes.
The art staff has turned- something
new in "The Adventures of Polly, the
Co-ed and Her Pals," and in many
other clever features.
Much interest is being manifested
in the coming college nu) ber of
Judge in which the Gargoyle ishop-
ing to be well represented both in
drawings, jokes and stories.
DELEGATES TO DES MOINES
CONVENTION ORGANIZE
Students who were delegates to the
Des Moines Student Volunteer conven-
tion have formed an organization for
the purpose of encouraging the growth
of the missionary spirit in the Univer-
sity. Lionel Crocker, '20, is chairman,
and Roswell Dellon, '21E, is secre-
tary of this organization, which will
hold meetings at least once a month.

Prof. Nelson Talks on Staging Play
Mast ues held a called meeting at 4
o'clock yesterday in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson
gave a short talk on the staging and
costuming of "Alice-Sit-By-The-Fire,"
the Comedy club play which he is
directing.
Death Takes Mrs. H. C. Anderson
Mrs. Henry C. Anderson, wife of
Professor Anderson of the Mechani-
cal Engineering department, died at
11 o'clock Tuesday, after many years
of ill health. '

ADRIA9TIC. QUESTION UNSETTLED AS COUNCIL ENDS

Nitti Declares He May Demand Ex-
ecution of Secret British Treaty
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 20.-With the disband-
ing of the supreme council without a
settlement of the Adriatic question,
Premier Nitti of Italy, declared he
stood by his ultimatum that if the
Jugp-Slavs did not accept Italy's
terms tonight he would withdraw his
compromise offer and that "Italy will
demand that France and Great Britian
execute purely and simply the treaty
of London of April, 1915."
Prior to the breaking up of the
council the Jugo-Slav reply to Italy's
demands had been presented and the
Italian premier declared the terms un-
acceptable.
The Jugo-Slavs accept international-:

ization under the League of Nations
for Fiume and Zara, and cede to Italy
the islands of Lussin and Pelagoza,
and agree to the demilitarization of
the Adriatic islands, with the condition
that the islands of Lissa remain Jugo-
Slav.
The right of the Italians in Dalmatia
to choose Italian/nationality 'without
leaving Jugo-Slavia is recognized by
the Jugo-Slavs, who also agree that
Italian national rights in Dalmationa
industries shall be guaranteed by an
international convention. They refuse,
however, to make any alterations of
the line drawn by President Wilson.
Premier Nitti left: this evening for
Rome and Premier Lloyd George will
depart for England. tomorrow. M.
Clemenceau indicated this evening
that he would turn over the affairs
of the council tomorrow.

All-

U

I

LYA SONKOLNIK TO
GIVE VIOLIN RlECITAL

WOMEN ATENDING HOP
MAY STAY IN NEWL UNION
BY-LAWS AMENDED BY BOARD
- MAKING ARRANGEMENT
POSSIBLE

Song, comedy, musi
be the predominating
all-nation Jamiboree t
der the auspices of I
club at 8 o'clock Th
Hill auditorium. A
talent has been -disco
foreign students sand t
cured to put on the 12
indication of providin
ansual interest.
. .Pres. Hutchins En
Pres. Harry B. Hu

PRESIDEN~
-ENDOF

1-

SOPH LITS HOLD SMOKER

it plain that
the socialists

Song, Con

MATINEE MUSICAL CONCERT WILL
BE hELD TONIGHT AT HIGH
SCHOOL
Ilya Schkolnik, the Russian ,con-
cert-meister of the Detroit Symphony
orchestra, will appear in a violin re-
cital with Mrs. George B.. Rhead as,
piano soloist in the Matinee Musicale
series at 8 o'clock this evening at
Pattengill auditorium in the Ann Ar-
bor High School building.
Several individual types of musical
composition will be represented on
the progam: the sonata; concerto,
aria, and minuette besids a few mis-
cellaneous numbers all by standard
composers.
The program will be as follows:
.Sonata...................Handel
Concerto Op. 64....... Mendelssohn
Allegro
Andante
Allegretto non troppo
Allegro Molto vivae
Aria ..................Pergolesi
La Chasse .........Cartier-Kreiler
Minuet (in olden style) .. Hochtein
Scherzo-Marentelle Op. 16.....
.Wieniawski
Introduction and Rondo Capric-
closo, Op. 28.........Saint-Saens
ALL-DENT SMOKER
SET FOR TONIGHT
An all-Dent smoker is to be held to-
night at the Union, preparatory to the1
inauguration of the new Dental so-
ciety of the University of Michigan.
The purpose of the smoker is to get
the society started on its way.
Among the speakers for the evening
will be Drs. M. L. Ward, R. W. Bunt-
Ing and U. G. Rickert. The music
will. be furnished by Diamond's or-
chestra and the regulars to such an
affairs will be there in the form 'of:
smokes, cider, and doughnut .
FRESHMEN LITS TO HAVE
FIRST DANCE SATURDAY
The first social gathering of the
class of 1923 will take place Saturday
afternoon, when the Freshman Lit
GJass will hold a .dance in Barbour
gymnasium. Due to the small capac-
ity of the building the attendance has
been limited to 250 men and 250 wom-
en. Both the receipt for class dues
and dince ticket must be presented
at -the door of the gymnasium.
According to Dean Myra B. Jordan
the purpose of the dance is to create
a democratic spirit anong the mem-
bers of the class. She also stated
that upon the conduct of this dance
depended planning o further social
affairs. Committeemen announced
last night that only 100 tickets re-
main for girls.
ZIONIST SOCIETY TO HEAR
DETROIT ENGINEER TONIGHT
Mr. Samuel Heyman, a Detroit en-
gineer and a member of the Detroit
Zionist District board, will speak be-
fore the Zionist society tonight at 8
p. m. at .ane hall on the subject of
"Engineering Projects in the Pro-
jectedJewish State of Pal'estine."
jected Jewish State of Palestine." Mr.
Heyman is a graduate of the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Techhology and
holds an honorary degree from -Har-

Women attending the J-Hop will, if
properly chaperoned, be accommo-
dated at the Union. Changes to this
effect were madt in the house rules1
by the Board of Directors at a meet-
ing Tuesday noon.
The board so amended the by-laws
that in addition to relatives of mem-
bers, women guests will be housed in
the fourth floor rooms on special oc-
casions, which will be determined by
the house committee. Reservations
must be made by written application
at the main desk. As many as 30
women can be accommodated if the
occasion demands and a great per
tent of the rooms have already been
reserved for the Hop.
Other changes in the rules regard-
ing women were made. To provide1
refreshments to the dancers, the main.
dining roomi was opened to women on
dance nights and special occasios.
This .will take the place of the tap
room, as soon as the dining room is
completed, all the equipment not yet
having arrived.
Hours for showing resident women
through the building were set at 10:30
to 12 o'clock Saturday and 11:30 to
1 o'clock Sunday. Non-resident wom-
en may be conducted through from
11:30 to 1 o'clock Sunday and, 0:20
to 12 o'clock week days.
Desk space in the new student of-
fices was granted to the interfrater-
nity athletic committee.

Several acts of
will serve to c
oriental costumes
troduce music pl
struments of man
the dance numbe

the

ineer
of e:

ment has tne er
versity authorit
tion of the pr(
priated for de
of the conventd
of Cosmopolitar
held in Ann A
"The member

to furnish
be both i
They are
ment and
dents and

TECNCOBE OUT-

kthe commu
Program '

Effinger,

Campbell and Bramm Among
Speakers

i of the;

lay and that
d and that
express its
that are to
^t

Emphasizing the value to be de-
rived from campus activities, Dean
John R. Effinger touched upon several
phases of the newer Michigan in his
talk before the sophomore lits at their'
smoker last night in the Union. Soph-
omore lits to the number of 300 met,
sipoked, ate, and listened to addresses

t the de-
a party
nes de-

¬ętl

on of discussing the responsibility of their
omen- position as second year men.
bring- "Getting Your Money's Worth Out
olence of the Sum I Take from You" was the

Geysers Is One of Subjects Dealt with
in Engineering Magazine
Technic, the magazine of the engi-
neering school, will appear the latter
part of this week.
The frontispiece will be a picture
of Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of' the
engineering school, and there will al-
so be an article of appreciation. of
him in the issue.
Some of the subjects that are dealt
with are "Industrial Pyrometry," "En-
gineering Organization," and "The
Engineer in the Community."
Prof. William H. Hobbs of the ge-
ology department will have an article
explaining the phenomena of geysers,
while 'Prof. John E. Emswiler of the
mechanical. engineering department
has an article entitled "Heat and
Work," which supplements the course
in E. M. 3.
DEAN BATES DENIES RUMOR
OF MINNESOTA PRESIDENCY

9, first Tuesday 8-12;
Tuesday 8-12; at 11, fi
12; at 1, first Wednesd
first Friday 8-12;. 'at2
day 2-6.
1Tuesday at 8, first';
at 9, first Thursday 8-:
Monday 2-6; at 11, first
at I, second Wednesday
and Thursday 8-12; at
'nesday 8-12.
Military science, first
shop 1, first Friday 22-6
a
ond Tuesday 2-6; shop
nesday, 2-6; shop 4, firs
drawing 4, first Wednes
ing 5, first Tuesday 2-6
first Tuesday 2-6; C.E.
day 2-6; M.E. 3, firs't N
E.E. 2, first Friday 8-12
la, first Monday 8-12;- ;
Wednesday 2-6.
,(Continued on Pa

and

conspiracy to
estroy the in-
and overturn
constitutional

NOTICE

the Gradu-
y from oth-
s of the Un-
ire as soon
transcripts
ate courses
a or regis-

theme which Treasurer Robert A.
Campbell developed in his talk. Prof.
John R. Brumm spoke upon the atti-
tude to be taken toward the gaining.
of an ideal University education, say-
ing, "Only the man who has- come to
Michigan with the view of increasing
his own knowledge, to be of use to his
fellow men, and to make the world
better and happier, can truly suc-
ceed." George Hurley, general secre-
tary of the Union, brought out the
co-operation necessary in every step
of University life to mould and de-
velop successful individualities. "Hon-
ors, campus, class, or academic are
but empty and valueless unless they.
are the result of honest achieve-
ment," he .said. Charles Eades, class
president, closed the program with
an appeal to the class for unity at
all times.
Music was furnished by an orches-
tra of 12 pieces, and two ex-Keith
circuit men, "Rans" Sherman and
"Glen" Otto, presented a novelty act
+hnt Airnw ga .t a otmiomic

"I

rom

Dean Henry M. Bates of the
school has denied the prevalent
mor that he had been offered

law
ru-
the

en-

NOTICE!t

s for

presidency of the University of Min-
nesota, to succeed Pres. Marion L.
Burton, who will come here as execu_-
tive in July.,
Student Council to Meet Tonight
The Student council will meet at
7:15 tonight in the council rooms on
the third floor of the, Union.,, This is
the first meeting held in two weeks,

lected betwee
and 12, and 1
Thursday, an
main corridor
The-dues am
Attention o:
to the Unive
such dues mu
fore a man ca
uation diplon
nfl an nti

Due to an error of the pub-
lishers, the price of army shoes
to be sold by the University
was advertised as $5.00 a pair,
.while the actual price is $5.50.
I /

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