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January 15, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGHT'
4 SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1920.

PRICE THREE

rr i YY ri w M I r . .++.. re i r I Yr '.. " I Y .w
T ,, r

SENIOR LIT CLASS
TO HONOR WENLEY
Prof. Robert M. Woniey is- tle
faculty member of the University to
whom the senior section of the Mich-
iganensian is to be dedicated it was
decided at a meeting of the senior lit-
erary clas Wednesday afternoon.
The lagest attendance of the year
marked the transaction of important
business including the appropriation
of more than $100 for the purchase of
jerseys for the class football team. A
report of the invitation committee
stated that covers for the invitations
have been selected. Roy Chandler,
'20, was chosen to write the class his-
tory.
The amount of class dues was de-
cided upon with the agreement that
in the future any further need for
funds would be met by assessment.
.]
ORGANIZTIONS' WORK
PRAISED 0Y HAYDE

NOTED BARITONE
HERE TONIGHT

. ;

A1L -COPMMITTEE
FOR I UNIlON opE
LEITZINGER, '20, GENERAL C
MAN, CALLS MEETIN'
FOR TONIGHT

Straccairl Will Offer Varied
gram at Hill Audi-
torlum

Pro-

red

ings

.I .r

d of I

S COMMITTEE AND DAILY
FOR ASSISTANCE ON
REFERENDUM

FAMOUS ACCOMPANIST TO
ASSIST' IN RENDITION
Three famous arias besides several'
groups of French, Italian, and Eng-
lish songs will distinguish the pro-
gram that Riccardo Stracciari, the
Italian operatic baritone, will offer
at the Choral Union concert at 8
o'clock this evening in Hill auditor-
ium with the assistance of Isaac Van
Grove, one of the finest accompanists
in the country.
A Linquist
Like most European artists Mr.
Stracciari is a linquist with a reper-
toire of Spanish, French, English,
Italian, and Russian. He did not
know a word of English until eight
months ago when he began studying
the language. His unusual proficien-
cy is a test of his linguistic skill.
Program Announced
The program is as follows:
Aria-"Oh, casto flor mi sospir,"
from "Re d'Lahore" ...... Massenetj
Cade la sera (Shadows of Even-
ing) ........ ........Mililotti
Star vicine (only smile, I will ask
nothing more).......Salvator Rosa
April ....................... Tosti'
Aria-"O de' verd' anni miei," +
from "Ernani".. ........Verdi+
Two Neapolitan Songs:
Mainella Mia .............'..Valente'
Canto per 'me ............ de Curtis
La Paloma...............Yradiery
Un donx lien.......Alfred Delbruck
Bonjour Suzon.............Delibes
Cause of You........ Frank Waller
Aria-"Largo al. factotum," from
"Barbiere di Siviglia" .... Rossinit

CRO:.,Di, MILES, AND GOSHKIN, WHO 'FORM
TIVE DBATING TEAM WHICH LEAVES
MORNING.

I I

MICHIGAN'S AFFIRMA-
FOR EVANSTON THIS

More . MeA Needed for
Dancing Parts,
Shuter

,. _

I

Editor, The Michigan Daily:--
Having had occasion'to observe the
r and operation of Tuesday's'referendum on
bring the peace treaty and the covenant of
treaty the League of Nations I feel impell-
;omor- ed to express the opinion that the
i lead- campus is under real obligations to
Mar- the Student council committee under
the chairmanship of Mr. Fred J. Petty
for the efficient manner in which it
handled the matter, and to The Mich-'
were igan Daily for the effective publicity
,lead- which it gave to the proposition. I
:hcock believe that nothing is more impor-
Oaager tant to the future of Michigan spirit
r Un- than the possession and regular use
Demo- of efficient machinery for the crystal-
Demo- ization and clear'expression of cam-'
orrow pus sentiment uponu any question
nes to which may effect the university.
emely Organizations Vital
Without such organization and such
leads activity the 8,000 individuals which
s pre- make up the campus community will
n re- remain a heterogeneous mass without
common desires, will, or purpose. And,
hough the creation of a keen group con-
tifica- sciousness offers, I believe, the real
d sev- solution of most of our University
ecure problems, including that of athletics.
epar-I f this be true the recent refrendum
artal was of value because it created and
ue of expressed the public opinion of the
it for group upon an important question.
- Public opinion everywhere develops
through use and atrophies through
. such disuse; the moral is obvious. The
e au- Michigan Union, the Student Council,
>f the and The Michigan Daily, with other
f sub- lesser organizations may render in
this connection a service of the high-
est order to the University.
S Expresses Opinion
If I may be allowed a few' more
[SM lines, I should like to express my own
opinion 'regarding the ratification of
'etary the peace treaty. T believe that it
te of would be little short of a'national ca-.
rticle lamity to throw the issue into the
ef in coming campaign; first, because it7
would delay a resumption of the
were "normal processes of our life" for at

LEACOCK LE"TUR 4'
SET FOR MONDAY
Stephen Leacock, the second of
prominent national men Ann Arbor
will be able to hear in: the next few
days, will speak at 8 o'ciock Monday
evening in Hill auditorium.
.His subject will be "Laughing with
Lftcock. Leacock is considered by
many to be the most prominent humor-
ist in Amercia today and has been
described as being a second Mark
Twain, His writings are published
currently in Judge, Vanity Fair, and
other important periodicals. Promin-
ent among his works are: "Literary
Lapses," "Novels," "Frenzied Fiction,"
and "Sunshine Sketches."
An interesting fact in connection
with Mr. Leacock is that he is a pro-
fessor . of political economy in McGill
university at Toronto, Canada. He'
will be introduced by Prof. J. S. Reeves
of the political sclence department, of
the local University.

A FOR 1EVNS TO N
"Government Ownership and Opera-
tion of' Coal Mines"
Subject
GOSHKIN, CROSSLEY AND
MILES MEMBERS OF SQUAD
Michigan's affirmative,squad leaves
at 8:50 o'clock this morning for
Evanston, where they are to meet
Northwestern in the Central debating.
league debate on the question of "Gov-
ernment Ownership and Operation of
Coal Mines."
Mr. Ray K. Immel, of the depart-
ment of .oratory, will accompany the
team on the trip. Prof. R. T. D. Hol-
lister, formerly of the oratory depart-
ment, will also be with the squad in'
Evanston. The judges for the de-
bate, which is to be held in Fisk hall,
are to be James P. Hall, dean of the
Chicago law school, Professor Sarett
of the University of Illinois, and"Pres-
ident Mac Michael of Monmouth col-
lege.
Are Experienced Debaters
Jack J. Goshkin, '22L, will be the
first speaker for Michiga,. Goshkin
graduate from Jefferson High School,
of Lafayette, Ind., in 1917, which
school he represented in several de-

TRYOUTS FOR
AND.CHORUS

Singing
States

CAST
WAN']

Committees for the coming U
opera, after having been ratified
the eligibility committee, were
nounced Wednesday by the Union
ficials. W. A. Leitzinger, '20, gen
chairman, has called a meeting for
the members of the committees, t
held at 7:15 o'clocli this evening
room 306 of the Union.
General plans for the productio
the opera will be discussed at
meeting. 9. Mortimer Shuter, dire
will talk briefly to the men.
Leads Wanted
Tenors, baritones, and basses
try out from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock
day'afternoon in room 308 of the
ion, so that selections can be m
soon for the leading singing and
parts. Mr. Shuter requests that
person, possessing a good voice,
out.
Further tryouts are being held fi
10 to 12 o'clock, from 3 to 5:30 o'cl
and from 7:30 to 9 o'clock for orien
eccentric, and clog dancers. Sey
good parts are still open.
'Need Chorus Tryouts
Men, desiring to. compete for
chorus, Ore requested to see
Shuter. They will be given an op
tunity if they do so at once. In
idual trys can be given now, wh
will afford men better chances I
in the collective tryouts later.
The committees as announced
General committee-William A. I
zinger, '20, chairman; Robert Gr
ley, '20E, Robert McKean, '21,
Edwin Krueger, '21E assistants; s'
manager--William P.' Favorite '
and Guy Shoemaker, '21E, Rich
Khuen, '21, and R. O. Kerr, '22,
be assistants.
Properties committee-Frederiel
Storrei, '21E, chairman; B. H. Log
'21, Pierce McLouth, '21E, and P
Eaton,, '21; costume committee;
W. Peattie '21E, chairman; I
Thompson, '23L, Fred Worcester,,
Robert M. Kerr, "21, and W. E. I
demer '22; publicity committee-Cb
ser M. Campbell, chairman; Jose
A. Bernstein, '22, Lee Woodruff,
EDurban Longanecker, '21E, Ja
Kennedy, '21, and Thornton W. qa
ent, Jr., '22.
King Electrician

PHUSI L EDUCATORS
HOLD DISCUSSION HERE
THREE DAY SESSION OF STATE
COUNCIL TO CONVENE'
IN UNION
The State Council of Physical Ed-
ucation will convene at 8:30 o'clock
this morning in the Union for a three
days' discussion of plans t+ formulate
a, uniform system of physical educa-
tion for all the schools in the state.
The council, of which F. A. Rowe,
state physical director is the head,
is the outgrowth of the Millen bill
passed at the last meeting of the leg-
islature. The bill compels all towns
of 3,000 or more people to have a
full time teacher of physical educa-
tion and. a gymnasium. The results
of this convention will be incorporated
into the next state course of educa-
tion. .

VUITE TY TERETURNS-
CAUSE MUCH COMMENT
PROFESSORS BELIEVE BALLO,
HAD BENEFICIAL
EFFECTS -

d gradua
recent a
e his beli

Comment on the result of Tuesday's hates.:V. Crossley,'2Land Earl
student and faculty referendum on the Miles, '21, are the other two men on
peace treaty was the rule everywhere the team.
on the 'campus Wednesday, and 4 live- Crossley is a graduate of Ferris Jn-
ly interest was manifested in the re- stitute, which he represented in the
turns from other universities through- Interscholastic debate. He also rep-
out the country. Early returns indi- resented Michigan State Normal col-
cated that Michigan's vote would be Ilege in two interscholastic debates
representative of the other schools4 while a student there. In 1916 Cross-
which took ballots, as Cornell was the 'ley was very active in the campaign
only large institution heird from for statewide~ prohibition.
which did not vote for the cornpromise Given Final Workout
proposition, Michigan's choice. *Pontiac is the high school from
Favors Compromise which Miles comes, havingg been in'
The significance of the ballot was 'debates for that school twice. He now
still a matter for guess-work. "It is is president of the Alpha Nu literary
hard as yet to see what -the returns society. A final workout V0as given
signify," said Prof. William A. Fray- the squad last night in Hill audi-
er. "I certainly am in favor of such torium when the two Michigan squads
a compromise as was voted here, but met in a head on debate.
as yet the national returns do not
seem to be unanimously for this, and HAROLD TITUS ADDRESSES
I note that Cornell has favored an- PUBLICATION STAFFS TODAY
other proposition. I do, however, be-
lieve that the idea of holding such 'a Harold Titus, .'11, who will speak
vote and arousing. student interest in at 3 o'clqck this afternoon in room
national. affairs is an excellent one." five of the Press building and before
Commends Attitude members of the publications staffs,
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves of the po- was active in campus journalism while
litical science department said that in the University. He served as man-
his only regret was the small turn- aging editor. of The Daily and also
out of students and faculty. "I be- as literary editor of the Gargoyle.
lieve the ballot was very successful," At 4: 15 o'clock Mr. Titus will",ad-
he said, "and it will be quite signifi- dress a maeeting of Sigma Delta Chi,
cant nationally if the majority of the of which he is a member, on the third
colleges and universities adopt the floor of the Union.

l
t
r
t
t

-u

spap:er writing.
>le," he declar-
iembers of the
rate the. stand-'
so educate the
their class will
ly necessary to
ance of news-
Jr. White serv-1
higan Daily for
'as founder and
f The Gargoyle
s of The Wol-
chool newspa-
ier f 1916 Mr.
n of assistant
in the Uni-

least 14 months, second, because it
would be impossible to obtain any
conclusive mandate from the ,people
upon the subject, and, third, because
it would inevitably tend to submerge
and obscure the other issues of the
campaign, many' of which are, of vital
and urgent importance. I believe,
with Mr. Bryan, that inasmuch as the
Republicans have the majority in the
senate, andtherefore the responsi-
bility, the Democratic senators should'
recognize the necessity of compromis-
ing upon a Republican and not upon
a Democratic basis. If the president
then refuses to accept the compromise
and pigeonholes the treaty he will be
in a position of political isolation on
this question,-nor will it be "splen-
did isolation."
Discusses Reservations
As to the Lodge reservations, I re-
gard the principle involved in one of
them, that on article X, as vital. I be-
lieve that this article was intended to,
and that it would morally bind our
government, including congress, to
interfere in the affairs of other na-
tions if advised to do so by the coun-,
cil of the League as provided by the!
article. Do we wish to be so bound'
for the future? If we intervene in any
given case, do we wish to do so be-
pause we believe the course advised

f
t
t
I

Speakers Announced
The business sessions will be held
from 8:30 to 12 oiclock, from 1:45 to
5:30 o'clock and from 7:30 to 9
o'clock on Thursday, and Friday. A
social gathering will be held from 91
to -11 o'clock Friday evening. Sat-
urday the business session will be held1
from 9 to 12 o'clock after which a
luncheon will be given.
Today's speakers and their subjects
are: Morning--C. Ward Crampton,
"Posture;" C. F. Tambling, "Educa-
tional Methods Applied to Physical
Education;" W. P. Bowen, "Sports-
manship in Athletics;" and Dr. G. A.
May, "Value of Formal Work ii Phy-
sical Education.".
Talks at Meals'
Afternoon - L. 0. Grant, "Shall
Health and Hygiene Subjects be In-
cluded in Physical Education?";
Charles Hedgecock, "What Place Has
the Teaching of Leadership in Phy-
sIcal Education?"; and Elmer Mitch-
ell, "Plays in Relation to Educational
Aims;" Lloyd Olds, "Soccer in Public
Schools."
Prof. A. S. Whitney of the educa-
tion department, will speak at lunch
today and Senator George Millen and
Representative Charles A. Sink, of
Ann Arbor, will balk at dinner this
evening.
The speakers for Friday will be an-
nounced in tomorrow's issue of The

Program comiittee--Murray, Gard
ner, '20E, Henry Whitin5, '21, Ma;
Covell, '21E, Russell Persing, '2'2
George Gregory '22, Edward Priehs
'22, and Sidney Sarasohn, '22; make
up committee-Kershaw Harms, '20E
E. K. Armstrong, '21, and Frank Lee
'22; music committee - Lewis 3
Schindler, '20E, and Howard Weeks
alsitant. Chief electrician is G. I
King, '20E, with Morris Norcap, '221
as assistant.
ROAD ENGIIt EERS
HEAR BLANCHARI

same conclusions as Michigan, favor-
ing adoption as soon as possible with
proper reservations. The interest in
the treaty caused everywhere on the
campus is a good thing, and I hope
the present attitude toward public af-
fairs continues."
ADELPHI REPRESENTATIVES
TO CHOOSE TRYOUTS TODAY,

MEDICS AND SENIOR LITS
HAVE PREFERENCE THIS WEEK
Senior lits and engineers will have
first choice on Friday night's dance
tickets at the Union until 1 o'clock
today when the sale will be opened
to all 'members.
Medics will have the privilege of

LOVEJOYI

Arthur H. Blanichard, professor c
highway engitieering at the Unive
sity, on last Friday evening addres
ed the Rhode Island F igineering s'
eiety on the subject, "The Developmer
of Highway Transport in the Unite
States." On Saturday he spoke c
"Relation of Highways to Motor True
Operating Costs," before the New Yor
highway transport conference.
On Monday, he delivered a lectui
at the University of Minnesota on "Tl
Economics Design and Utilization c
Bitiminous Pavements." At the r(
quest of President Burton, a confe:
ence was held with university officia
relative to efficient methods of cc
operation between the university* an
the Minnesota state highway depar
ment. The university authorities ei
pect that the people of the state wi
approve at the 1920 elections a bon
issue of $100,00Q,000 for the improve
ment of state highways.

es, and still more
e program of the
smoker held last
try club rooms of

- I buying tickets for Saturday night be-
Following the lead of the Alpha Nu ginning at 5 o'clock today and end-.
debating society which held its Mid- ing at 1 o'clock Friday.
Rest debate tryouts last Friday, Adel-
phi House of Representatives will. Rhodes Scholar Arrives in England
hold a special meeting at 7:30 o'clock j Ralph M. Carson, '17, former in-
this evening on the fourth floor of Itructor of rhetoric, who left as a
University hall to choose its Mid- Rhodes scholar, has arrived safely in.
Western tryouts. All members are England according to a cable receiv-
requested to attend the meeting. ed here yesterday.

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