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January 10, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
rung except Monday during the Univer-
n Control of Student Puhlications.
F THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ss is exclusively entitled to fhe use for
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
nd the kcal news published therein.
office at Ann Arbor. Michigan, as second
ier or mail, $3.50.
Press building, Maynard street.
)6o; Editorial. 2414.
to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
o appear in print, but as an evidence of
nts will be published in The Daily at the
if left at or mailed to The Daily office
s will receive no consideration. No man
unless the,writer incloses postage.
t ecessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
cations.
.Managing Editor
'hone-2414 or :oi6
........... .....Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2738
........ . ..Asst. Managing Editor
.~City Eaitor
.......... Sports. Editor
.~Women's Editor
................Telegraph Editor
ITORIAL BOARD
H. Hardy Heth
...Advertising Manager
Issue Manager
.~Office' Manager
... Publication Manager
....... Circulation ~Manager
Subscription Manager
...Music Editor
. ............ Literary Editor
.Exchange Editor
.Campaign Editor
.Efficiency Editor

S i , .L' V1 lt.i-31
cessful season not to be desired 'by an enterprising
university? Can the new respect and admiration for
Center college, which stepped so triumphantly from
oblivion into athletic supremacy, be completely ig-
nored? Surely'the brilliant showing of this dimin-
utive college signifies more than a stroke of luck.
No indeed.-The fact that a university does
achieve the "honor and glory" of athletic success
is, in itself, generally sufficient proof of the spirit
of service and loyalty to fully justify it. Even though
Professor Sleator challenges this spirit of obligation
to one's alma mater, he must admit there. is no
greater justification of the fidelity to friends, coun-
try, or religion.

b

ANNUAL SALE-
STATIONERY

Saturday Jan. 10

GRAHAM'S

BOTH ENDS OF
DIAGONAL WALK

I,.

Adams Brewster Campbell
hy John I. Dakin
L STAFF
>leski Dorothy Monfort
port Minnie Muskatt
rk- RJobert C. Angell
ithan . Robert D. Sage
Thomas J. Whinery

. A MENTAL CRUTCH
Too many students use their notebooks as a men-
tal crutch. Instruction in some classes has come
to mean an attentive' ear and a freely flowing foun-
tain pen rather than a careful consideration and
weighing of the facts and theories presented. It is
' so easy to become a sort of stenographer and to
translate ideas into words into a notebook without
thought. Then when examination time comes, a
few hours cramming place them into the mind long
enough that they may again be transcribed into a
quiz book and then straightway forgotten.
To get the real value out of a lecture or class
discussion is to listen with the mind as well as with
the ear, examining and concluding, and writing into
the notebook just enough to start the same process of
thinking again when the mind is confronted with
the notations taken. The best notebooki is merely
a shorthand report of what has been recorded in
the mind.-The Daily Kansan.
S
What's 'in a name? The Philadelphian banker
who will head the organization of Quakers in dis-
tributing food to Europe's hungry is called Alfred
Scattergood.
As the Indiana humorist so adequately expressed
it, where it used to be a disgrace to get drunk it
now is an achievement.
In the November, 1919 number of the Health Cul-
ture magazine is an article by Dr. D. H. Patchem.
Ha, gargoylish.
They're only a month away. You know what we
mean. A word to the wise, etc., etc.
The campus squirrel wanted to know yesterday
what has become of Professor Porta.

DETROIT JNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 'gtq)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited ard Express Cars-6 :zo a.
and hourly'to 9 : o p. M.1
*ackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48'
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bouad-6:oS a. m., g:os a.
m. and every two hours to 9:os p. n., o:So
. n. To Ypsilanti only, :i4i: . zna . o*
a. mn., end to ,Saline, chanige at gs~ilanitL
Ypsilanti.
Local,Car West Bound-- :48**a.*m.. and
1 z2:2o a. m.

DIARIES AND
DESK GALEI
WAHR'S

ov

a

Michigan Daily advertising it the
one recognized means of r aMS
student trade.

Give our GRIDDLE CAKES, TOAST and COF
a trial. Table and counter service: Our 35c and 40c Re
Dinners save you money.

Jllttlllll llll1111111l1111Itlltlfll

S STAFF

D. P. Joyce.
Robt. Somerville
Arthur L. Glazer
F. M. Heath

I

Sconcerning news for
ue editor; who has full

asemman r'.ruw r' 'iii
TALBOT- 2%si.
. YRONE --2s in.
ARROW
FoT lt COLLARS
are curve cut to fit the.
shouldcrs per cCtty
Cktttfeabocy &CoInc.9L akers

512 EAST WILLIAM STREET
Block and half from Campus

VIDAL'S-

as follows:

:. ,

night;
Sargent,

RY 10, 1920.
T TO WIN?
promotes football suc-
:s untenable, is the
Sleator of the physics
ation to The' Daily of'

I

ity"

i

The Telescope

NEXT WEEK IS TI
EAST WEEK OF OUR'
PRE-INVENTORY
CLEAUANCE

-
it '1 I
+ 'V

NEXT WEEK IS THE
LAST WEEK OF OUR
PRE-INVENTORY'
CLEARANCE

I

p .

.-t. r

author suggests inviting contributions from
lent body in defense of the above contention
smuch as The Daily itself has consistently
great confidence in the truth of the' thesis, it
resist attempting a defense itself.
e first place, Professor Sleator admit the
of "clean and sportsmanlike play." But he
t say how these benefits are to be gained if
e away success, the very incentive to athlet-
he element of, competition with a goal of
is just as indispensable to the securing of
in athletics as it is in living itself.
"the honors and glory which athletic suc-
nfers upon the university are imaginary,"
iot admit. Just as the world always has and
will admire the man who excels in a par-
line of activity, be it mental or physical; so
always admire the group q men whd excel
.rticular line. Call it hero-worshipif you
nd that form of worship, we are told, is not
ier without merit), but the fact remains that
l and mental prowess must be given its d.
uch a justification of "the honors and glory
etic success" is probably illogical and per-
nceited. It remains to be p.roved that there
efits far more tangible than honors and glory'
re conferred upon a university by its ath-
:cess.
: were the elements which went to make up
uccessful il9 football season for Micjhi-
n an editorial which appeared in The Daily
ember 23, 1919, seeking to correlate the va-
:asons, given for the disastrous year, it was
hat' it is "this attitude ' of irresponsibility
eeks to pass on the blame for a poor season
ext man" and that "we are confronted with
e -designed to prove the gross inefficiency of
factors, the lack of, business,, acumen of
and the outright indiff.erence of still others."
a was made, not for "the vapid and popular
on of duty which prompts a; man to per-
rtain obligations in an indifferent or even
c spirit simply because .he is expected to,"
er for that sense of duty which "makes a
out and look for the things' that he knows.
d but need not necessarily do."
if these are the elements responsible for an
ssful season, we may reasonably assume
iccessful season is not likely to find them in
e. In other words, a successful athletic sea-
reasonably be taken as an indication that

eIf We Pronounced Them Like We Spell Them
Oh! Wasn't I the mutt
-I pronounced' it debut.

And long ere I thought of marriage
I always pronounced it garage.
And well I remember we boys
Always called it Illinois.

We resurrected this one out of the 1830 edition of
the Army. Joke Book. Probably another one of the
reasons why "Sherman was right."
"What do you call 'the mule?".
"Vesuvius."
"Why? Because he's'so fiery?"
"No. Because he's got so many eruptions on
him."
The latest addition to the Royal Order of Oili
Cans is the bird who laugls before you get'to the
point in your story and then registers blank when
the joke is sprung.
When a man is mentioned a Vassar girl asks,
How much has he?
Michigan girl--What frat does he belong to?
Ypsi girl-Where is he?
West Hall's Only Rival
For Sale-One 1815 Model Ford.-Free Press
adv.
We now rise to inquire, What has become of the
y village -"cutup" who used to tell this one every time
a college man was mentioned?
Mistress (weeping)-Yes, Lenamy son has gone
to Yale.
Lena-I know: yust how you feel, mum. My
son's bane to yail nine times.
Dear Noah:
I find that I am. experiencing' considerable diffi-
culty in getting along with my studies. What would
you recommend? Ambitious.
For our own part we find that the best way of
getting along with your studies is to treat them just
as you would some people-never: bother them.
Pamous Closing Lines
"Bury me in the fireplace, so my ashes will min-
gle with the grate," said the dying.man.
NOAH COUNT.

Clearance Specials
in RedtoWa

Our Annual Pre-Inventory Clearance is the
cause of the many unusual bargains we.are offer-
ing in Women's Ready-to-Wear

A4

Blouses
Our complete stock of Blouses,
excepting tailored Crepe de Chines,
is selling at a discount of '20%.
This includes models of every sort,
taking in Georgette Crepes with the
Russian blouse effect and, many oth-
er new and entirely original concep-
tions-all at 20% less.
(Second Floor)

Scarfs
A special lot of regular $13.50
Angora Scarfs with a few slight
and not at all. noticeable imperfec-
tions make an exceptionally attrac-
tive Pre-Inventory Clearance Spe-
cial at $6.95 each--and a scarf is
a necessity this weather.
(Second Floor)

Middies $7.95
All wool regulation Flannel Mid-
dies, splendidly made, regular
$10.5Q values, all sizes for $7.95.
(Second Floor)-

Petticoats. $4.95
Jersey top Silk .Petticoats and
changeable Taffetas in all colors;
regular and extra sizes; values to
$8.50, very special at $4.95.
(Second Floor)

Many other values in broken sizes and short lines

,

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P,-"Vzwr-w --

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'f.'Y far. .:

Entrance 124 S. Main

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