100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1920 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-ni

I11l ,I
1!lII
rrr'rq
Nir

SCUSSION TO JIECEE
VOTE ON PEACE TREATY

i

t WORN"

WHAT'S GOING ON

WEDNESDAY
12 :00-Newark, N. J. club
Michiganensian picture

to bave
taken at

1C1

!r /III +r~-'\ -
itif you invest it in one of those instru-
ave been wanting for a long time--a Vega,
1 or Tenor Banjo, a Gibson Mandolin or
n Saxophone.
cant the music from the new shows you
Christmas vacation, you know where to
a and hear the latest popular and operatic

Mrs. M. M. Ett
6111-605 East Etii att

(Continued from Page One)
en immediate nation-wide publicity,
the committee urges that every facul-
ty member and undergraduate study
up on the referendum and vote. Mich-
igan's showing an this first test of
student opinion on serious national at-
fairs will be watched by the public
and by other universities with the
Greatest interest..
A sample of the ballot follows.:
STUDENT BALLOT
Vote for one proposition only.
I favor ihe rattfication of the League
and Treaty without amendments or
reservations. ( )
I am opposed to the ratification of
the eLague and the Treaty in any
form.
I am .in favor of the ratification of
the Legue and the Treaty in any
with the secific reservations as vot-
ed by the majority of the Senate.
I favor any compromise under reser-
vations which will make possible the
immediate ratification of the Treaty
and the League.
I favor the government proceeding
to make peace with Germany at once
and leaving the question of a League
of Nations to be settled afterwards.
I favor a compromise of-the reser-
vations of such a character as will
"avoid the 'danger of defeating ratifi-
cation while still making clear that
America can only be involved in war
by a declaration of congress, that do-
mestic questions and the Monroe Doc-
trine are entirely outside of the jur-
isdiction of the League, that plural
votes of any member are all disquali-
fed in the event of a dispute wherein
we are disqualified from voting, and
that on deciding to withdraw we are
to be the judge of whether our obli-
gations have been met.
Situation Important
- President Harry B. Hitchins, Prof.
J. R. Hayden, and George Hurley met
Tuesday morning to discuss the ref-
erendum, and agreed that the situa-
tion was very important. In the first
place, the results will be noted very
keenly throughout the nation, and it
was felt that Michigan should "put its
best foot forward." Moreover, in view
of the great difference of opinion on
the matter throughout the country, and
the act that few even in the univer-
sities knew their own minds on the
matter, it was felt tha communities
everywhere should be awakened by
discussion of this sort to express
themselves and formulate opinion on
he great question.
Students Should Vote
In the co? ege and university bal-
lots, the three believed, was to be
found the opinion of the better class
of thejpeople. Students, in view of.
their citizenship duties, should in the
opinion of President Hutchin, Profes-
sor Hayden, and Hurley, awake to
their responsibilities and turn to se-
rious consideration of great national
problems. As 'every facility for scur-
ing information will be offered them,
the duty of availing themselvesqf this.
and voting intelligently in this first
referendum is emphatically urged upon
all undergraduates, and upon the fac-
ulty as well.

Spedding studio.
12:80-Saginaw club I officers have
Michiganensian picture taken at
Spedding studio.
2:30--Choral Union ushers report at
Hill auditorium for Library dedica-
tion.
3:00-Library dedication exercises in
Hill auditorium.
4:15-Bayonne, N. J. club, to have
Michiganensian picture taken at
Rentschler's studio.
7:00-Fresh Mandolin club practice
in Lane hall. .
N :00-Varsity band rehearsal in Uni-
versity Hall. Members requested to
bring music racks.
7:00--Sigma Delta Chi meets in room
304 of Union.
700--GrifflIns meet in Union towers
fifth floor..
7 :15--Commerce club meeting at Un-
ion.
3:00-Zionist society meets in Lane
hall.

I

THURSDAY
club rehearial at Lane

7:00-Glee
hall.

'i

(Continued from Page One)
the east side. This floor also has the
medical reading room and periodical
rooms on it. The third and fourth
floors are given oven almost entirely
to graduate seminary work.
Green Tint Used
The building is finished throughout
in a soft green tint. The woodwork
is of quarter sawed oak which has a
grayish green finish which was devel-
oped by Prof. J. F. Shepard of the
psychology department, who is a spe-
cialist in color psychology.
In building the Library provision
was made for future enlargement. Its
present size will take care of all needs
for some time as it can accommodate
1,000 persons at one time, and it has
room for 1,000,000 volumes. The book
stacks may be enlarged so that it will
hold twice this number of bpookg.
There is also much space about the
building which may be used in time.
The building was made possible by
two appropriations by the state legis-
lature, one in 1915 which gave $15,-
000, and the other in 1917 which add-
ed $200,000 to this amount. The total
cost was $615,000, the difference being
mde uip by the Board of Regents from
the general university fund. On ac:
count of war conditions, the con-
struction work was held up, and ope-
rations were carried on under great
difficulties. It is estimated that the
building would cost more than $1,000.-
000 if built at tfe present time.
ATHLETES HEAR OF MICHIGAN
THROUGH SECTIO14AL CLUBS

JHop
suitable Woolen's for-FULL
It takes time to tailor Dress

ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Miss Moses wish to announce
that their third term of dancing les-
sons-in the Michigan Union Annex will
begin Monday, January Eleventh.
The "Beginner's Class," fo those who
have had no previous instruction or
practice, will meet Monday and Wed-
nesday from seven-fifteen to eight-fif-
teen p. im.-
The "PRE-HOP Class," designed
specially for, but not limited to, those
planning to attend the Junior HIop, will
meet on Tuesday and Thursday. This
class is for those who know how to
dance and wish to learn the latest
steps and variations. It will start
Tuesday, January Twelfth, (at seven-
fifteen P. M.) and will end with a com-
plimentary, formal party Friday eve-
ning, January thirtieth.
Enrollment for women will be held.
in Newberry Hall, and for men in the
Michigan Union Annex from three to
five o'clock p. in., Thursday and Fri-
day.
Classes are exclusively for Univer-
sity men and women, who are cordially
Invited to join.--Adv.

FRIDAY
'0:30--Settions 59 and 590 -of U. S. A.
A. S. hold banquet inUnion.'
7:30 - Baptist guild sleigh ride.
Couples only.
7:30-Polonia Literary circle meets in
Lane hall.
U-NOTICES
The meeting of the Girls' Educational
club has been postponed until Wed-
nesday, Jan. 13.
.hoge desiring to go on the Baptist
guild sleigh ride Friday jevening if
weather permits, 'all. Whitney at
Lane hall or Way, 1391, before
Thursday noon.'
Class presidents of all classes are in-
structed by the Michiganensian to
have their class offlcers individual
pictures taken immediately for the.
class pages of the yearbook.
All class treasurers are asked to.
make arrangements with the Michi-
ganensian at once in regard to con-
tracting for the dedication, history,
and class officer page space.
Organizations which have not as yet
had' group photographs made for
the 1920 Michiganensian must have
their pictures taken before Jan. 13.
Seniors may make appointments for
Michiganensian sittings now, te
time limit for this work being
Jan. 31.a

(Continued from :
holidays by the Roche
New York. This smo
primarily to arouse I
athletic situatioA at E
the alumni, and plans
banquet for graduating
students during the spi
Committee wanti
As yet it is impossil
letic coinmittee of the
conference to give a
but they request that
secretaries turn in imm
of prospective athletes
been gathered by men :
As soon as this is don
ready to start an intel
to bring thes'e men to:.
also request that inde
names of athletes to t
of the Interfraternity
leave them at the desi
for the conference corn

e One)
r club of
was given
est in the

Los

i for a
school

Tsts

ne of NEW VESTING
look is to buy.

Wishing You

A Happy New Year

'alcoim

Malcolm Block

Typewriting, promptly, neatly and
accurately dbne. O. D. Morrill, 17
Nickels Arcade.-Adv.
Read -he Daily for Campus News.

RIii.,Ma r7a, RI tic! cnm hnn

ement and Invitation

new Betsy Ross Shop is now practically
:ed and we extend a cordial invitation to
:riends to come in and see it. ,Students,
townspeople, all are included. No mat-
:her you want to buy or not, come in and
)und. We want you to see our drapes,
ons, lighfing effects and especially our
)n features and comfortable upholstered

OFFICERS ARREST 15 IX RAID
ON COMMUNIST MEETING
(Continued from Page One)
i-ine radicals rose in a body from
dinner and rushed "movie" men off
the premises. On the return of the
camera men with seven burly in-
spectors, the women charged again
and swept the place clear after a
spirited fight. The casualties were
one man badly scratched and another
decorated with a black eye, the result
of a "left swing," by a girl who said
she had fought in the Russian wom-
an's battalion of death.
DETROIT REPUBLICANS FAVOR
LOWDEN AS 1920 CANDIDATE
Detroit, Jan. 6.--Gov. Frank C. Low-
den of Illinois was given the prefer-
ence for Republican presidential nom-
inee in a poll of the annual meeting of
the Detroit Republican clu, at which
plans were formulated for the club's
participation in the 1920 campaign.
Other possible candidates were sup-
ported In the following order: Gen-
eral Wood, Senator Poindexter, Sen-
ator Johnson, General Pershing, and
Charles F. Hughes.
May Delay Exchange of Ratifications
Paris, Jan. 6.-It is reported in dip-
lomatic 'quarters that while -it will
not be impossible for the exchange of
ratifications to take place Saturday,
the ceremony may be delayed until
Monday, Jan. 12.

SCHO,0L OF,
DANCING
516 E. William St.
1ANETTI KRUSZKA
RESIDENCE PHONE
1780-W
STUDIO PHONE
1422_J

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Organized 1803 -
FIRST ANN ARBOR MEMBER
OF THE FEDERAL RIESERVE
SYSTEM
OLDEST NATIONAL BANS
IN MICHIGAN
3 Per Cent Paid on Savings
Deposits

Nickels Arcade

r>

,
3

For Satisfactory Amateur
Finishing leave your Films
at

I

MR. AND MRS. W. F. RAY.

Quarry's. Drug

. 1

m 4r

'amnuR Wawa raar3 fh

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan