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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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DAY ANI

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1920.

PRICE

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CHOSEN

NEW

NEW UNIVERSITY
OFFICE CRELATED
A new .office, that of assistant sec-
retary of the University, was inaugur-
ated .an. 1. PaWl Buckley, '05L,
former deputy clerk in the supreme
court of Michigan, has been appointed
ot fill the position.
The' duties of the new office have not
been clearly outlined as yet, but it is
expected that they will be principally
to assist Sec'y. Shirley W. Smith.
New private offices for the secre-
tary of the University and purchasing-
ag'ent were completed and occupied
during the holidays. The entrance to
the offices is on the south side of the
secretary's main office.
Temporarily, Assistant Secretary
Buckley is sharing the office of Secre-
tary Smith. . /

P..RESIDEN
8 E E T' H I E O I N STUN I V E R S I T Y H E A D F O R P R E S I D E E D R E Y ( CI YMM

eaker at the Li-
cises to be held
ay afternoon in
take as his sub-
Democracy and
er, who was as-
s A. Edison in
imercializing the

REGENTS GRANT
Minimum Salaries Announced for Fac-
ulty Show Increase; Summer
Budget Raised $50,00
1919 J-HOP RECEIPTS GO TO
FUND FOR CAMPUS THEATER

I

The Salary increases ranging from $300
for assistant professors to $800 for full
professorships were granted at the
' December meeting of the Board of Re-
y, gents held Dec. 19 in Ann Arbor, and
lbert a budget of $123,876 was approved for
jum, the. summer session of 1920.
rary, $1,O0 a Minimum
fthe
will Minimum salaries for all members
nig of .the Uiniversity faculty were an-
of nounced by the Regents, $1,500 was
f re- set as the minimum salary for instruc-
k. tors. For assistant professors there
was an increase of $300, making $2,500
will their minimum salary. Salaries for
but associate professors were raised from
in $2,700 to $3,000, and those of full pro-
is fessors from $3,200 to $4,000.
Ned- The approved sum of $123,876 to be
10 set aside for the coming summer term
ines is an increase of approximately $50,-
seen 000 over the budget of last summer.
In Advanced salaries, additional equip-
ment and an increased staff are held
responsible for the larger outlay, it
was brought out at the meeting.

-----------
alpi mill ill

P

-HARRY B.

DR. MARION L. BURTON, WHO SUCCEEDS,

PRESIDENT

HUTCHINS ON JULY 1, 1920.

1920 MICHIGANENSIAN

is

on Page Five)

O ai

good sha
i of hig
timer E

jd Berry on Athletie Board
Vera Prof. C. S Berry, of the education
department, wes elected to the board
'n" 12 in control of athletics to fill the vac-
ancy by the resignation of Prof. Wait-
ape, lyrics er Fishleigh. Becatuse of the. success
h, quality, of the course in pubic health nursing,
Shuterthe course was nide a permanent
one. Prof. Dora Barnes will continue
Y to' take as director.
a will en- For the publication of the University
nday, Jan. Humanistic series, a gift of $1,100 was
accepted by the Regents from Paul
t who can Grey, of Detroit.
of clog or The 1919 J-Hop committee present-
to report ed $162.03't the Regents at the meet-
, in room Ang. The sum represented the bal-
g tryouts ance left in the treasury after all ex-
and it is penses were paid for the 1919 J3-Hop
youts will and is to be used as the nucleus for
the campus theater fund.

I

WILL HONOR HUTCINS
DEDICATION TO BE MADE TO
PRESIDENT FOR THIRD
t ~T
For the third time' in its 24 years
the Michiganensian will be dedicated
to President Harry Burns Hutchins.
The first dedication took place in
4898 when Dr. Hutchins was serving
\as acting-president during President
Angell's absence in Europe; the sec-
ond dedication was accorded by the
1917 volume of Michigan's official
yearbook; and the third will be sub-
mitted to the President by the 1920
Michiganensian in recognition of the'
completion of his long term of serv-
ice to the University.
Seniors Warned
With the opening of school after the
holidays, attention of seniors of all
classes is called to the matter of ar-
rangements for Michiganensian sit-
tings. Appointments with the pho-
tographers should be made at once as
the individual prints for the senior
class page panels niust be taken be-
fore February. Only by special per-
mission and an extra charge may sit-
tings be made after Jan. 31.
Time Extension Granted
Seniors who graduate at the end
of the present semester, and those who
will not graduate, until the end of the
coming summer term, are eligible for
representation in the 1920 yearbook.
For those organizations which were
unable to get appointments for group
pictures before Christmas vacation
additional tim of seven days is now
granted. All group photographs must
be taken and approved by Jan. 13.
Action Taken on Military Credit
All applications for military credit
have been acted upon by the commit-
tee on military cred and the results
are being mailed to the applicants to-
day, according to Dean J. R. Edfinger
of the literary college.,
Depauw Glee Club Plans Trip
The men's Glee club at Depauw un-
iversity, is ,planning a prolonged trip
through Illinois, Indiana and Michigan
Aivno n in yxrin-- 7Ica -ni rr

BRITISH FEELING FOR
S WORLD LEAUE WH TE.
SEES SOLUTION OF IRISH DIFFI.
CU1TY THROUGH VIEWS
0 CONSERVATIVES
"The change in sentiment 'towardl
the English position .in the world is
without doubt the greatest of all
changes in Great Britain during the
last four or five eyars of warfare and
reconstruction," states Hon. Alexander
Frederick Whyte, member of the
Brtish parliament, who spoke on
"Changing England" in the Natural,
Science auditorium Monday afternoon.
Outlook Broadening
"The rank and file of British de-
mocracy have altered their opinion of'
England's 'splendid isolation' policy
in favor of the greater international
policy-the League of Nations. The
intensity +f belief in the league as a
guarantee against war has been caus-
ed by the five million young men who
fough in the war for five years and
do not care to undergo such awful
experiences again."
Three Changes Noted
Mr. Whyte brought out three other
great changes in England as a result
of the conflict, the general accept-
ance of woman's suffrage, the differ.-
ent attitude toward labor and the la-
bor party and the Irish question.
The solution of the Irish 4ifficulty
Mr. Whyte foresees in .the nar fu-
ture. The canging sentiment is caus-
ed not by a y action of Ireland, but
by the new views taken by the Con-
servative party, which, adopting a
policy of independence'}and assistance
to small European states, could not
overlook the conditions so near, at
hand and have hence altered their
feeling toward home rule.
Babe Ruth Goes to Yanks
New York, Jan. 5.-The purchase of
Babe Ruth of the Boston Americans
by the New York American club was
announced tonight by Colonel' Jacob
Ruppert, president of the New York
club. Colonel Ruppert refused to state
the price p'aid for the champion home
run hitter.
clen4 funseni Pn lanneda t+ Caaliarnsta

NOTICE;
On account of the dedication
of the new Library' building, all
University exercises will be sus-
pended from 2 to 6 o'clock Wed-
nesday afternoon, Jan. 7.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President..
M"IMPROVES IN I
Wolverines Win Three in Five From
State's Strongest Basketball
Quintets
BASKET SHOOTING AND TEAM
PLAY SHOW IMPROVEMENT
"Michigan's playing in the holiday
basketball trip was highly satisfac-
tory and the result was even better
than was anticipated by Coach Math-
Such was the statement that Captain
Rychener made to characterize the
holiday trip made by the Michigan
court five during the vacation.
rOn the first' night of vacation the
~Wolveriues dropped a disappointing
game to the Western Normal quintet,
'27 to 14. The Michigan forwards were
able to throw only three field baskets
because of the brilliant defense that
the teachers displayed.
On Dec. 31, Michigan played the
'Oakland Motor team at Pontiac, win-
ning 20 to 9. The feature of this come-
back was Michigan's strong five man
4efense that the auto makers were un-
,able to pierce. Rea and Dunne prov-
ed to be excellent scoring machines
and threw the majority of the bask-
ets.
Flint Team Defeated
On New Year's day the Varsity went
to Flint and, played the Champion
Ignition team, one of the most pow-
erful fives in the state. On account
of Michigan's accurate basket shoot-
ing, and a good five man defense the
Varsity gained a favorable verdict, 34
to 15. Dunne and Rychener were the
bright stars of the gam, the former
throwing six field goals. M. A. C. was
forced to play five minutes overtime
the previous Monday in order to win
from the Flint team, 29 to 28.
The two games played in Detroit
were the most satisfactory of the trip.
In the first Michigan overwhelmed the
Detroit' Athletic club 36 to 17, with
Dunne, Henderson, and Rea featuring
on the offense and the entire team
playing well defensively. Michigan
gave further signg of superiority over
M. 'A. C. owing to the fact that the
Aggies were defeated by the D. A. C.
team, 24 to 11.
Ray, Game Closer
The holiday series was finised in
the game lost to the Rayls, Jan. 3,
19 to 14. Michigan held the hard-
ware team even until the last few min-
utes of play, when the Detroit tea
went into the lead. As the Rayl team
is one of the strongest in the country,
Michigan's showing is highly gratify-
ing to followers of the Wolverine court
,game. On Dec. 26, Chicago played the
Rayls and were" defeated 33 to 21,
which gives Michigan a slight edge on
the Maroon five. J
The five games played this vacation
show that Michigan has made 'an im-
provement in every department of the
,game. Henderson, Rea, and Dunne

seem to have located the basket and
are dropping in five or six apiece in

MINNESOTA FACULTY REGA
LOSS OF PRESIDENT BURTO
AS A CALAMITY
ALUMNI'ALSO APPROV
SELECTION OF BOA
Pres. hutchins Will Conclude
'Years' Work at. higan Whe
He Gives Way to Successor
Aaculty opinion is unanimous i
hearty approbation of the Reg
choice of Dr. Marion L. Burton, I
ident of the University of Minne
as a successor to President Harr
Hutchins yesterday. "We have "
his office July 1, 1920.
"I consider Dr. Burton the i
man for the position," said Presi
Hutchins yesterday. "We have 1
warm personal friends for a nut
of years, and I believe he posse
that combiation of qualities mos
strable for the position."
An All-Round Man
A faculty member 'of the Unive
of Minnesota says in a letter to a
fessor in the University: "As I
leaving Chicago, I heard that P
dent Burton had accepted the p
dency of the University 'of Mich
This we regard as a calamity. I t
he is the strongest all-round'ma
the whole bunch of American tnI
sity presidents. He may not be i
,lutely prfect in any one regard,
he combines in a larger measure
'of the necessary qCalIties than
other man I know."
Alumiji Express Approval
Regent Juninis E. Beal received.
following telegram Wednesday:'
University of Michigan club of
England extends hearty greetings
the Board of Regents and congi
lates ,them on their wise choice C
m6st distinguished and worthy
cessor to our beloved President Hi
ins. It is a great augury for the
tinued growth of prosperity of ou
Alma Mater."
The University of Michigan clu
Detroit sent the following telegra
President "Burton: "Detroit ahi
through the University of Mich
club of Detoit wish to congrati
you upon your selection for and
ceptance of the presidential chai
our b'elovd Alma Mater. Alumni
have finally awakened to the nece
of real concerted action upon t
part, and we feel confident that
will be willing to assist us in ou:
forts toward any plan for bette
the University. We wish you the g
est possible success in your
work,' and assure you of our sit
support in every University matt
which we may be of assistance."
A Leader, and Organiser
Dean Henry M. Bates of the
school expressed himself as I
much pleased withthe acceptan
Dr. Burton. "He ha&\iiade a n
for himself as a leader and orgat
and will usher in, I believe, a
era of progress and prosperity fo
University," said Dean Bates.
Dean John R. Effinger of the Co
of Literature, Science, and the
said that he was much pleased
the choice of toe Regents.
"I am willing to be quoted bii
perlatives," said Registrar Arthi
Hall yesterday. "I believe he is
ideal candidate, possessig all th
sirabilities of all the other men
posed-'for the( offce. He is y
enough so that he can guide the
'tny of the University for I
years}"
Sympathies Broad
"President Burton has the un

sal and unreserved approval of
engineering staff," said Assistant ]
William H. Butts of the College
Engineering and Architecture,
night.. "While ie is not trained a
technical lines, his sympathies
known to be broad and not limited

TRI

EATY VOTE PLANNED

accordance with a proposed na-
wide plan, a referendum vote of
aculty and student opinion of the
ersity on the question of the
y of peace will be taken next
day.
Action Requested
is was decided upon by the Stu-
council at its last meeting be-
the holidays and a plan for tak-
the vote was adopted..Action fol-
d the receipt of a telegram by
ident Harry B. Hutchins from
erick P. Benedict, editor-in-chief
.e'Columbia Spectator, asking that
University of Michigan hold such

political discussion in Hill auditor-
ium, the meeting will consist simply of
a formal explanation of the referen-
dum and of the six propositions on the
ballot, as well as the history of the
circumstances leading up to the
League of Nations idea."
To Conduit Forums"
"Informal and unofficial student
forums will be opened at the Union
from time to time, and students will
thus have an .ppportunity to air their
own opinions. A sample ballot will
be printed in The Daily so that all
may understand the issues."
"All plans for leading up to the ref-
erendum will be decided on at a meet-
ing of the JStudent eouncil committee
Tuesday afternoon in the Union."
Speakers Sought
C. E. Bottum, '20E, appointed by F.
1. Petty, '21, chairman, to secure
speakers for the Hill auditorium meet-
ing, says that several good authori-
{n "n ~~~ - M- . "-,

1 au11in spingI1 va i n. Wee natJIV-ilripspGl u. I mulmK~1"mu nib lt' IL44 1 m.YLI

I

gn of Information
al campjaign of informa-
-in with a general mass
ay, Jan. 9, in Hill audi-

_-... - - --'- - - -- r' La '_every game
to towns in Indiana are under con- Adjacent to the campus of the Un- Michigan plays at least two more
sideration. iversity of Southern California the preparatory games before opening the
greatest museum, of natural science Conference season with Indiana here,
222 Princeton Men Decorated in the United States is to be establish- { Jan. 17. 'Hillsdale will be Michigan's
During the past war 222 Princeton ed. Specimens of every mammal and opponent Jan. 11; Albion may be se-
men won 287 decorations and citations, greatest museum of natural science ,cured for the following evening, and
including two congressional medals 'of every bird that lives in the United Western Reserve will come to Ann Ar-
honor. States or its territories will be there. bor Jan. 16.

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