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October 04, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1919.

PRICE TH:

PRIE T

F

MICHIGAN SPIRIT

I

IS

Michigan spirit has been known nation-wide for many a year,
and Michigan has been noted for its men ever since it was old
enough to be known for anything. Just what Michigan spirit is and
what Michigan men are it is difficult to define, but there are a few
outstanding characteristics with which men new at Michigan should
be acquainted. And today is a day that is auspicious for the enum-
erating of a few of these'characteristics.
First of all, Michigan has always been sportsmanlike. Maize
and Blue teams have a reputation for square play and clean fight-
ing. Michigan students have a reputation for showing good sports-
manship wherever they may be and whatever the conditions, wheth-
er the team is winning or losing. Loyalty to the team and the
University it represents is taken for granted, but from time to time
men new on the campus do not realize whkt true loyalty means. It
is considerably different than what ordinarily passes for loyalty
at high schools or small colleges.
Loyalty to a Michigan teamr neans that it must be supported in
" its square play by just as square rooting and cheering methods.
The opposing team must be given equal opportunity to play the
game. There must be no hooting down of signals, no jeering, or
cat-calls. Such things are not tolerated at Michigan. Good plays
by opponents are applauded just as lustily as are Michigan plays;.
injured players are cheered regardles of the colors they wear.
Courtesy marks all true Michigan men, and every courtesy must be
extended opponents.
This afternoon there will be a football game, the first of the
year. Thousands of men new to*Michigan will be in the cheering
section. It is disloyalty not to attend the game, and it is just as
much disloyalty to be discourteous to our opponents. Michigan spirit
is always the same, for new men as well as old, and Michigan spirit
means fair play.

WOLVERI NESSTART '
GR SID SEASON TODAY
Yostmen teady to Make 1919 Debut
-In Battle With Case; Engi .
neers Strong
VICK OUT OF CONTEST; CRUSE
WILL START AT FULLBACK
HOW THEY'LL START
Michigan Position' Case
Dunne .......... .L.E..... ..Domizi
Goetz (Capt.).....L.T.....Gettman
Fortune.......L.G..... Finklestein
Culver.........C. .C . ...Edwards
Czysz or Johnson.R.G.....C. D. Wood
H. Wilson ..,...R.T......J. C. Wood
Ry ........... .R..... ...Town
Sparks ..........Q.B. . McCune (Capt.)
Weston... . .L.H.. . ..Hale
Knode........R.H........ Medsker
Cruse .........F.B......... Duering
teferee-James Durfee, (Williams.)
Umpire-P. B. Sampson, (Spring-
field.)
Game called at 2:30 o'clock.

COURSE OFFERED
IN MENTAL TESTS
The Department of Education an-
nounces a new ,two hour course in
Mental Tests, meeting Monday and
Friday afternoons, 3 to 5, at the Edu-
dational Laboratory, T. H., with Pro-
fessors Berry and Whipple in charge.
The laboratory includes drill 'in the
technique of Mental tests, as applied
both to individuals and to groups, to
children and to adults, including tests;
of sensory capacities, attention, mem-
ory, learning, reasoning and the like,
and more especially systems of tests
desiged to measure general intelli-
gence as the Binet-Simon tests and
the United States army tests. The
work will inc1yde not only methods of
applying these tests, but also statis-
tical methods of handling their re-
sults.'
The course is open to those of at
least junior standing, having had
previously a course in general psy-
chology, and with the consent of the
instructor.

MORAN SAYS Ki
WON RATTLE,I
5SOX BY PITC

CHICAGO
ITS

SOUTHPAW
FIRS'T VICT
RACE

FISHER ALLOWS '
RUNS BY WILD
Reds Able to Get Only
Off Windy City Hu
Are Confident

JA.

t cafe-
N. R.
teriolo-
lms, is
rms at

Reds
White

By Innings
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sox 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0

I

I

arding to
tfll LSUN SHOWS
ed is its
urization
lie guar- Nf
r on the MPROVEMENT
the in-
lk. Grayson Allows "Very Sick" Bulletin
says Dr. to Stand for Day; Reticent
f the to- About Facts
the re-

A-ILY IN ATTENDANCE AT
BESIDE OF PRESIDENT

in proc-
ng sold (By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 3.-Reports from
xcellent the bedside of President Wilson whose
at-does condition during the last 36 hours has
ly tests been less favorable indicated no
city we change late tonight and again the
re sell- President was lept in bed with physi-
cent of cians in constant atendance upon him.
state's Rear Admiral Gary T. Grayson, his
ove the personal physician, let the announce-
and 4 ment that the President was "a very
eurized, sick man," stand throughout the day,
s numi, issuing only a brief bulletin saying his
ia few condition today was "unchanged."
pint. Family at Bedside
.e TbTre was another consultation of
co dis physicians and immediate members of
g these the President's family came to the
on that white house to be near him.
nd .with Although reticent about details of
ts sure he condition of their patient those who
emic is attended him indicated that his ail-
pply is ment had not clearly revealed the ex-
All the tent of its inroads on his system and
hat the that some days might be required to
:hand-disclose its full effects.'
im suf- Flu Attack Lingers
should Nervous exhaustion with which he
as and is suffering complicated with his long
asteur- standing weakness of the digestive
organs and a lingering touch of last
spring's attack of influenza the doc-
NS tors say, have considerably weakened
the President's powers of resistance.
Rioting
;rtland i
n pick-
armed Orate In Senate
urn to
red by
rrested Active in the debate now going on
d into in the United States Senate concern-
s.~ ing the proposed League of Nations
are four former Michigan men.
Fifteen 1 Probably foremost among them are
it near Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock, '81L,]
nd ne- of Nebraska, an active supporter of
is be- the administration, and Senator Por-
eaders ter J. McCumber, '80L, of North Da-
ptured. kota, who is one of those in favor of
d and mild reservations.
Less active in the discussion but a
strong supporter of President Wilson
state- and his league proposals, is Senator
et this Charles S.' Thomas, '71L, from Col-
ion of orado. The fourth Senator, H. F.
e gov- Ashurst, '03L, hails from Arizona and
7d also sides strongly with those in favor of
by the the League without reservations.
appeal

ROOMPHICES DU
FORA LARGEFALL
Union Files and Letter to Daily Big
Helps in Saving Situa-
tion
STUDENT VICTIMS REFUSE TO
PAY UNREASONABLE RENTS
"Well, we are moving and have
come down t see what you have to
offer in the way of cheaper rooms."
These and similar stories are be-
ing told to the clerks in charge of the
room file at the Union. Many stu-
dents who h4ve found it impossible
to meet the increased charges that
have been made for their quarters
are moving out and are coming to the
Union in numbers for the purpose of
making use of the files that have
been produced by the efforts of the
Unin housing committee.
Open Letter Jlelps Cause
So far George Hurley, general sec-
retary of the Union, has received no
replies to his open letter published
in The Daily two days ago. It is
Mr. Hurley's opinion that the letter
acted as a stimulus to those who saw
no way out of paying-the high rents
and now they. are taking the matter
in their hands apd are finding new
quarters by means of the Union
'files.'
There has been a drop in the
prices of many of tire rooms on file
but in one case the landlady who
read the articles in The Daily said,
"Wellif the Union and The Daily are
going to try and lower the prices I'll
raise mine." In this instance the land-
lady now is facing a vacant room
and her roomer has secured new quar-
ters through the Union files.
New Plan Unnecessary
The plan of leasing and sub-let-
ting houses that was suggested when
rooms were scarce will not be taken
up by the Union now as the shortage
is done away with. "We now see no
necessity of taking further steps to
locate rooms for we have an assort-
ment that will satisfy the require-
ments of all classes of students," said
Mr. Hurley.
NO INFLUENZA IN
ANN ARBOR NOW
Ann Arbor at present is practically
free from influenza among the stu-
dent body. There is but one mild case
in the city.
Dr. W. Essinger, the city health
officer, states there is not likely to
be such a serious epidemic as last
year but that there is bound to be
some pneumonia.
The health officer also ,st'ates that
many of the fraternity houses have
not been satisfactorily cleaned up and
that especially the sleeping quarters
of some are dusty. He says that
this is dangerous and should be at-
tended to at once so as to avoid con-
tagion from germs left from last

Michigan's Varsity eleven will make
its official. 1919 debut this afternoon
against Case.
Coach Yost devoted the heat of
Friday afternoon to "a final study of
strategy and position, using two
lineups to demonstrate his last words
of advice. The session was closed
with A series of formations which
both teams ran through searately.
Vick Out of Game
A last moment surprise was sprung
yesterday in the removal of Vick
from his position at fullback in the
Michigan lineup. The husky ex-cen-
ter is suffering with a bad heel re-
suiting from the infection of iblis-
ters and Yost does not care to risk
further additions to his permanelt
sick list. This change in the eleven
will send big Bill Cruse into the far
back job -and shift Knode to half.
Cruse has been one of the bright
spots in the few scrimmages held and
is expected to use his plunging abil-
ity to equal advantage in his new lo-
ecation.
In scratching Vick all kicking .re-
sponsibility falls on Sparks, who will
also guide the team. . The fast little
quarter took a short workout in
booting yesteyay with 'Goetz and
Knode. His spirals were getting off
in good shape and that end of the
game should be well handled. His
kicks are more accurate than those
which the big fullback has been pro-
ducing although the distance covered
is about the same in both cases.
Speed Important Factor
Beak Weston, who goes in at the
other Wolverine half, has been hit-
ting his old stride and is expected to
make a strong running mate to
Knode. Speed is the feature of this
pair and the Case flankmen will have
to work overtime to prevent open
field disasters.
Captain Goetz will take care of left
tackle with Hugh Wilson holding the
corresponding job on the right wing.
The guard positions areofficially di-
vided between Fortune, Johnson and
Czysz. It is not known definitely
which two will take the field' at the
first whistle but it is certain that all
three will be used some time during
the fray.
Rye, who has changed his training
from the backfield to the line, will
replace Peach at right end. Duke
Dunne is slated to retain his berth at
left flank. Culver at center will com-
plete the Wolverine lineup ivhich is
scheduled for action at s2:30 - this
afternoon.
Case Rated High
Case comes this year with a team
which is one of the strongest yet
produced by the Ohio school. The
game this afternoon will mark the
twenty-second consecutive tilt be-
tween Case and the Wolverines, the
Cleveland outfit having come to Ann
Arbor for 21 seasons without a
break. In addition this clash will
mark the 13th lid yhich Case has
taken off the Maize and Blue sched-
ules.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS WILL
GIVE FIRST FRESHMAN TALK
First of the series of talks to fresh-
men will be given at 3 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon in University hall.
President. Harry B. Hutchins will
speak. These meetings will be held
Mopdays, and not every afternoon, as
was stated through error in a recent
issue of the Daily.

LIST

SHioWS IVE fENIN\'G
M~OST SOCIETIES ON'
CAMPUS;

Standings of/the different men's
and wome s organizations as shown
by the scholastic chart issued from
Registrar Hall's office last evening
indicate that all organizations ex-
cept the general fraternities and
clubs included under the name of
"all house clubs" have suffered a
drop in scholarship from last year.
1 Grade Is Highest
*Cannon, a women's club, takes the
first place with an af'erage grade
'above B. ,,On the chart of 1917-1918
no club or fraternity was found
above the B line. Kapa ,.Kappa
Gamma comes next on tl chart and
heads the list of general sororities.
The general fraternity section is
leaded by the Beta Phi while Nu Sig-
ma Nu heads the professional frater-
nities. The Hermitage heads its sec-
tion.
Averages taken of the different'
organizations in each group resulted
in the following order: general so-
Forities, other women's clubs, pro-
fessinal fraternities, all house clubs,
professional sororities, general fra-
ternities.
A list of the relative standings of
the different organizations arranged
according to groups is as follows:
General Fraternities
Beta Phi, D'elta Kappa Epsilon, Chi
Psi, Zeta Beta Tau, Sigma Nu, Al-
pha Delta Phi, Kappa 'Beta Psi, Phi
Sigma Kappa, Beta Th'eta Pi, Phi
Gamma Delta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Sigma Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, Pi Upsilon, Theta
Chi, Delta Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon,
Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi
Kappa Psi, Phi Sigma Delta, Phi Mu
Alpha, Delta Tau Delta, Phi Delta
Theta, Zeta Psi, Acacia, Alpha .Tau.
Omega,-Deta Upsilon, Theta Delta
Chi, Sigma Phi.
Professional Fraternities
* Nu Sigma Nu, Delta Sigma Delta,
Phi. Beta Pi, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Xi
Psi Phi, Alpha Rho Chi, Gamma Eta
Gamma, Phi Rho Sigma, Delta The-
(Continued on Page Six)
Get -In EarlyOr
You'll Stand Up
Overcrowded class rooms have ac-
compauied the enormous attend-
ance at the University. Standing
room has been at a premium in rhet-
oric, history, and economics sections
as well as in the other departments
of the literary college and the same
thing has been, true all over the
campus..
To relieve congestion the number
of sections in the Spanish depart-
ment has been more than doubled.
More than 850 students, 200 more
than the largest previous record
made in 1916-1917, are taking Span-
ish, of whom 500 are ┬░begnners.
A meeting of the heads of the
Economic department was held Fri-
day afternoon to discuss arrangements
to cut down the enormous size of
many of the economics classes.
Mot anA n. r atnf+ le do AoAni,

OFD

SCHOLRSHIP CHART
ISEDBY REGISTRAR

(By Associated Press
Chicago, Oct. 3. -- Chica
Sox today served emphatic n
they were still in the worl
piQnihip contest by defeatin
nati 3 to 0. The series no
Cincinnati 2, Chicago .
Dick Kerr, who tame to
from- Milwaukee, pitched u
ball, allowing but three scat
and but one pass.
Allows Only Three Ii
He made everybody sit up
at him today for his left v
tainedmore mysteries than
Duncan,' Kopf, and Fisher,
cinnati piher, were the o:
to obtain singles off the
while his lone base on ba
granted to Groh. None of t
letes ever reached third.
Twenty-nine thousand peri
the game, which was play
bright shn and a temperat
was ideal.
Fisher, who was Moran's c
today, was the 'first'right h
.fered by the Reds, the fi
games having been. 1won ,by
and Sallee, both southpaws.
hurling was as good as that
er of his teammates. He
seven hits and issued two
Two of the Sox runs, howe
largely chargeable to the R
er, for it was while his wi
to catch a runner at second
ing retrieved that the first
players were put in a pos
score and Gandil drove thei
the rubber a moment later.
Fisher Throws Wild
In the second inning, Joe
hit cleanly to left. Happy
bunt rolled to Fisher, wh(
wil4ly to catch Jackson at
The ball rolled into center,
reaching third. On the t
third Felsch gained secon
men on second and third a
out, the stands went wild ye
victory then and there.'
Chick Gandil, Sox first
came to bat at this thrilli
ment. He jswung at the fi
pitched and it landed cle
right, Jackson and Felsch bo
ing the plate.
In the fourth Risberg deli
one long hit of the day at
sulted in the third and last
shortstops wallop went Into
and before the ball was ret
was on third. Schalk cani
in the emergency and hit o
came so erradically to Fis
he was unable to place his
it. Risberg scored.
SCotte May Come B
Indications yvere tonight t
er "Hod" Eller or Walter
would be Manager Morn's
for, the fourth contest t
While no- announcement was
was generally believed that
Gleason of the Sox would s
die Cicottejto the mound n.
fort to even up the series.
CHINESE STUDENTS CLUB
22 MEMBERS AT FIRST TtI
The Chinese students club
first meeting Friday night
hall. A discussion was he
preparation for the celebratii
anniversary of the Chinese
on Oct. 10, and on drawing u
plication for the holding of
Chinese Students conference
Ann Arbor. The represent

It

t
s

TRYOUTS WANTED
. Tryouts are wanted for the
Athletic Program. All wishing
to work on the program should
see A. E. Zigler, '21L, at 4 o'clock
Monday afternoon in the Press
room of the Ann Arbor Press.

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