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December 13, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-12-13

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1919. PR]

STERS TAKE
SENIOR LAWS

Fifteen embryo lawyers success-
ily pleaded their cases for entrance
to the ancient order of Barristers at
e tribunal held yesterday after-
oon. Although the court commenced
roceedings shortly after 3 o'clock it
as found necessary to adjourn 'to the
nion for, food before completing the

Those who were given a favorable
'HOUT decision were: Ray A. Butler, A. S.,'
C A R S Buzbee, R. L. Carpenter, It. A. Don-
nelly, H. I. Eager, D. S. Elliott, E. .'
Gordon, W. C. Hall, S. A. Lambert, R.
ver f'art F. Merner, A. S. Paley, J. K. Pollock,
ad S. Shartel, D. G. Smith, C. M. Toohy.
At the banquet at the Union talksI
.- were given by Prof. Evans Holbrook
s) and Prof. . C. Grismore. J. E. Chenot'
Alabama spoke relative to the present athletic
ht of the situation at the. University. L. G. Car-
: have in- rigan also gave a short speech.
of thel
and Mis- HONOR SYSTEM A SUCCESS
ntgomery1
treet car--
h hardly ENGINEERS HAVE USED PLAN FOR
I electric THRVE YEARS AND FIND IT.
and wat- EFFECTIVE
n stream
the river Editor The Michigan Daily:- j
For three years the honor system
Js a the has been in vogue in the engineering
asbof , thecollege, and in that time its effective-
attlsburg, ness and success has been establish-
the rfloods ed. By their co-operation the engi-
neers practice a high Ideal of fair-
drowned ness, essential both as a successful
Montgom- career and good citizenship and in his
piofession especially is honesty vi-

1-3 fFSTUDENTS
AE CURCHGOERS
Statistics Show That 2,620 Out of 7,800
Go to Religlops
Services
47 PER CENT OF THOSE WHO
EXPRESS PEFE RENCE ATTEND
With the purpose of securing accu-
rate data on church attendance of
Michigan students, Rev. Lloyd Douglas
of the First Congregational church
phoned all churches in Ann Arbor
Friday morning and listed the esti-
mates they gave of the numhber of Uni-
versity undergraduates at their serv-
ices.
47 Per Cent Show Preference
The most important of his findings
was the discovery that not 15 per
cent, as previously published, but 47
per cent of the students expressing
church preference at registration act-
ually are attending services.'
It was also found that the percent-
age of church attendance of the en-
tire student body was 35 per cent, and
that the number of students express-
ing preference was 71 per cent df the
total enrollment. Of the 7,800 stu-
dents now in the University 5,537 ex-
pressed church preference, and 2,620
are attending services.
Figures Secured'
The figures secured for each church
are as follows, the first figure repre-
senting the number of students ex-
pressing preference for that denomina-
tion, and the second representing the
number actually attending: Baptist,'
388-100; Catholic, 800-50; Christian,'
150-50; COngregational, 785-400; Epis-
copalian, 660-400; Lutheran, 275-50;
Methodist Episcopal, 1,300-520; Pres-
byterian, 1,109-400; Unitarian, 80-50.
EMMA GOLDMANGIYC S
FIGHT TO BERWTH MIN.,

(By M. K. E.)
Even the jaded follower of amateur
theatricals is sometimes rewarded for
his past martyrdom by a production
that is really worth the time-and, in-
cidentally, the two dollars. Such, at
any rate, was the case last night at'
the second performance of "Red
Feather."
The Klein-De Koven comic opera is
professional in presentation as well as
in authorship. Somehow, it lacks most
of those amateurish qualities which
are the bane of nearly all campus pro-
ductions. Trained voices in the cast
and chorus are no negligible factors
in "putting across" a play for which
tuneful music is the chief raison
d' etre. Of course, we are not attack-
ing Mr. Klein, for a plot would be an
indignity to a musical comedy.
Excellent Quality in Duet
Vocal honors' go to Mrs. Pearl Mc-
Geoch-Walcott and Mr. James Hamil-
ton who, especially in the duet, "To
Call Thee Mine," displayed voices of
excellent quality, standing out well
despite the too sonorous accompani-
ment of a large orchestra.
Evelyn F. Rockwell, Reba Griffith-
Klumpp, Marion Treleaven, and Rob-'
ert R. Dieterle did some excellent solo
work. Miss Rockwell, in addition to
her pleasing voice, deserves much
credit for her partrayal of the chic
little milliner. Her faultless stage'
presence contributes much to the con-
vincingness of her role.
Comedian's Part Well Taken
Milton H. Fehling as Baron Blumer-
storms is every bit the comedian, his
handling of this rather difficult part
leaving nothing to be desired. Anita

Plan Used for Three Years
The honor system places on each
man the responsibility foi his own
E acts, treats him as a gentleman, and
demands the response of a gentleman.
Since' the engineering collage as a
in body voted, in 1916, to adopt this sys-
tem of examinations, all classes in that
~n college -automatically come under it,
r and must be ready at all times to up-
ve hold it.
ib- "Cribbing" a Non-Essential
Id- Some students, -who insist that
n- "cribbing" is as essential to passing a
As course as an instructor is to teaching
it, might well consider the primary
ich idea of an education. Mere learning
he does not constitute a complete edu
by cation. There must be coupled with
it a discipline of character, a echool-
he ing in the high ideals which makes a
man a man. Honor in his dealings
with others, absolute fairness and
frankness in all his affairs, make more
IT for advancement and success than re-
sorting to petty, underhand short cuts.
>al Practice honor, play fair, and be
'18 square.
In- THE HONOR COMMITTEE.
>er
nt ACES ASK CREATION
'ss OF AERO ACADEMY
to
se
tre (By Associated Press)

Second Performance of" Red eather"
Shows Evidence, of Professionalism

Sower, '22, holds
too short a time
solo dance.

the stage for only
In a well executed

DELAY OF SUPREME
HER TO REACH
IGN

COURT AIDS
DEC15-

f t

is unani-
'1 engiki-
power to

nner.I

17

hIletic dele-
track man-

Washington, Dec. 12.-Five Ameri-
can "aces" credited with having
brought down more than 50 German.
airplanes advocated today before a
house sub-committee the creation of
an aeronautical department of the
government to co-ordinate all aerial'
activities.
Include Rickenbacher
The group included Captain Eddie'
Rickenbache, who is credited with 27
air victories in France and Lieut. Com-
mander P. M.. L. Bellinger, command-
er of the N.C. 1 during the trans-At-
lantic flight.
Commander Bellinger testifying from
the standpoint of a naval flyer said
that the naval air forces while work-
ing well, were not up to full efficiency
and could be improved through. the
proposed consolidation.
Make Recommendations
Recommendations made during the
hearing included establishment of a
national flying academy, government.
subsidies; to manufacturers and pre-
liminary training of army land navy
flyers under the same system.
Lowden Starts Iowa Memorial Fundi
Iowa City, I., Dec. 12.-Governor
Frank 0. Lowden of Illinois, is the
first member of a $10,000 club being
formed among graduates of the Uni-
versity of Iowa in connection with
,the campaign to build a soldiers'
memorial at the University. He is a
member of the class of 1885, 'and re-
,ceived the honorary degree of LL.D.

(By Associated Press)
New York, Dec. 12.-Rather than be
separated from Alexander Berkman,.
her companion of years, Emma Gold-
man announced tonight through her
attorney th t she had abandoned her
legal fight n the supreme court to
prevent her deportation to Soviet
Russia with Berkman and some 80
other radicals.
Prefers Deportation
Miss Goldman, the attorney stated,
preferred jail or deportation, "to con-
tinued custody on Ellis Island," where
she is held by emigration officials.
The refusal of the supreme court
to delay Berkman's deportation, her
attorney said, also had led Miss Gold-
man to abandon her fate. He quoted
her as saying that "if Berkman must
go, I and the rest will go with him."
\Later a statement was issued by
Miss Goldman in which she, said:
Ready to Go
"I desire to go as boon as possible
to Soviet Russia and' I expect the
government to keep its promise to de-
port Berkman and myself as well as
other Russians within 10 days. Citiz-
enship by naturalization today is 'RO
protection to any former alien,
DR. LERRIGO, FORMER MEDICAL
MISSIONARY, TO SPEAK HERE
Dr.'P. H. J. Lerrigo of Boston, Mass.,
former medical missionary to Alaska
aid the Philippines, will occupy the
pulpit both morning and evening on
Sunday in the, Baptist church. Today
Doctor Lerrigo will be at the Baptist'
guild house for personal interviews.
The Northern Baptist convention re-
cently selected Doctor Lerrigo as the
man to co-operate with students who
plan to take up some line of chris-
tian work.
FACULTY CONCERT POSTPONED
BECAUSE OF COAL SHORTAGE
On account of the fuel situation the
complimentary faculty concert an-
nounced for Sunday afternoon has
been postponed. The new date will be
announced later..
This will in no way affect the eon-
cert to be given Monday, Dec. 15, at
8 o'clock by the New York Chamber

FRA1TERNITY MEN WILL
GET. ATHLETES' NAMES
ADOPT PLANS TO ACQUAINT HIGH
SCHOOL MEN WITH
MICHIGAN,
"Immediate action is necessary" was'
the gist of the message given to the
representatives gathered at a meet-
ing of the athletic committee of the
Interfraternity conference held yes-
terday afternoon in the Union.
Start Work Now
The meeting, which was well at-
tended, was called with the intention
of impressing on the fraternity repre-
sentatives- the necessity of starting,
their ndenon the work of gathering
names immediately. Under the pres-
ent plan all fraternity men are to
get in touch with athletes, football
men and others, through personal ac-
quaintance and by writing coaches and
sport writers in their home towns.
Will Send Out Literature
The men are to write personal let-
ters to likely athletes, and hand their,
names to the central!"Interfraternity
athletic committee, which will, send
them University literature. The com-
mittee expects that by the first of next
semester it will have a mailing list of
more than 1,000 names.
At yesterday's meeting assess-
ments were levied on all fraternities
participating in the csmpaign, to de-
fray expenses which will be incurref.
The next meeting is scheduled for
Monday afternoon.
Student Volunteers I[eet Tonight
Student Volunteers will meet at 7:30
o'clock tonight in Lane hall. Dr. P.
H. J. Lerrigo of Boston, will speak.
All delegates to the Des Moines con-
vention are requested to meet with
him.
SCHOOL CLOSES DEC. 19
By order of President Harry
B. Hutchins all classes through-
out the entire University will
close Friday night, Deck 19.
Thus the holiday vacation will
extend' from Friday evening,
Dec. 19, to , Monday evening,
Jan. 5.
ARTHUR G. HALL,'"
Registrar.
Ja. *G.HfL

Of ensemble dancing there was
none, but the little milliners and the
Spanish dancers filled this deficit.
Acting Good
The acting, as a whole, was very
fair, but some of the male stars seem
to forget that "all the wrld loves a
lover"--and so does the girl. Even
one who is not an adept at this gen-
tle art can detect too conservative an
attitude on the part of certain nobles
of Roniancia. (Fitting name-that, but
they don't live up to it.)
Chorus Above Average
. The chorus, usually the offendez in
campus theatricals; evidenced the re-
suits of careful and efficient 'diree-
tion. A larger stage might have al-
lowed more freedom of motion.
The scenery, costumes, and lighting
effects constitute a colorful' back-
ground for the action of the play. Fu-
turistic art will have its say, even in
the revival of an old' favorite like
"Red Feather."
STUDENTS SUPPORT PLAN
FOR POOR'S CHRISTMAS
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
WILL ENTERTAIN
CHILDREN
Success of the plan to clothe and en-
tertain Ann Arbor's poor children
through the generosity of fraternities
and- sororities was made certain at the
general meeting of representatives of
houses Friday afternoon in Lane hall
A 100 per cent record was tiade by the
sororities, every house arranging to
outfit and entertain at least one child.
Twenty fraternities promised to take
at least one-boy, clothe him, and give
him a real Christmas party, Most of
the dormitories and University houses
have already made arrangelments
Has More Names
Those fraternities and house clubs
which did not send representatives to
the meeting Friday will' ho assigned
a boy if they will get in touch with
J. E. Goodwillie, '20E, Saturday morn-
ing or Monday at Lane hall.
Fraternities and house clubs agree-
ing to take care of from one to three
children were Phi Alpha Delta, Beta
Theta Pi, Sigma Chi, Acacia, Phi Kap-'
pa Sigma, Psi', Upsilon, Theta Xi,
Monks, Phi Delta Theta, Trigon, Alpha
Delta Phi, Delta Theta Phi, SiD~fonia,
'Lambda Chi Alpha,. Chi Psi, Phylon,
Zeta Beta Tau, Phi Gamma Delta, PI
Delta Phi, and Hermitage.
To Campaign for Funds
Funds to provide fruits and toys for
children in the hospitals who cannot
be entertained by the houses will be
secured in a general campaign MQn-
dae and Tuesday, under the direction
of the Y. M. C. A: and Y. W. C. A.
committees. Boxes will be placed In
.all buildings on the campus, and the
University public will have an oppor-
tunity to contribute.
YOUR PART IN THE
SOLUTION OF THE
ATHLETIO PROBLEM
The first game of the 1919-20 basket-
ball schedule of the University will be
played at Waterman gymnasium to-.
night.. Despite the fact that the riv-.
als who have been picked for the first

contest are not considered the strong-
est opposition in the west, they are in
position to test the strength of the
Wolverine five.
The game this evening offers the
students of the University their first
opportunity sinc.e the close of the foot-
ball season to give evidence of their
support ~ of a Michigan Varsity, even
in the face of the football disaster.
This year's Varsity basketball squad
is untried. The men have been work-
ing hard and have been. scrimmaging
among themselves, yet they have not
yet been in an actual game.
A great deal depends on the outcome
of the first battle of the season.. One
of the best ways of being of service
to the University is to help the team
win. Help it win by giving it your

shortage as soon as the fuel supp
in the various regions justifies it.
Let.Up Jus~fied
Director General, Hines said cond
tions Din the regions varied greatil
and coal still was being shipped fro
the east to the west, but that'remov
of restrictions might be, shortly just
fled.
The railroad administration rece'ive
unofficial estimates during the da
that from 65 to 70 per cent of t
miners had gone back-to work. Prival
reports to operators said that in Ix
diana nearly all the men( had retur
ed, but elsewhere a good deal of d<
lay was being shown.
Fuel Admi istrator rfields res
nation sent to President, Wilson yew
terday was alscussed by Wh ite Hous
oflciis, who expressed the belief th
it would be acepted though it Wi
not Indicated the preside it as yet ha
acted. The work of the fuel admini
tration, it was said,probably would' I
transferred to the railroad adminli
tration. Dr.( Garfield refused to dii
cuss the matter.
Act on Betterment
Operators representing the Centra
Pennsylvania district, one of the lari
est in the United States, were the fir
to act today 'on the settlement pr
posal, and while, accepting it critici
ed the terms with the utmost vigor.
"The method. proposed by Dr. Gai
field for settlement of the strike w
interferred with by government oL
cials who knew little of the situw
tion" the operators stated. "The prol
lem was taken out of his hands. Ti
public and the operators 'as a resu
have been delivered into the hands <
the United Mine Workers of Amei
Ica.'.
n5
Lift Restrictions
Pittsburgh, Dec. 12.-The Pittsburg
committee of the United States ral
road administration announced t
night that all restrictions on light, he
and power in Pittsburg derived fro
the use of bituminous coal would b
lifted tomorrow.
Return Train Service
St. Louis, Dec. 12.-Passenger tral
service curtailed as a coal savio
measure will be returned to norm
in the southwest region at midnigi
Sunday, .". F. Bush, regional directo
announced tonight. Mr. Bush expresi
ed the belief that the fuel situation I
the district would be virtlly normf
by Monday.
FRESH OCEAN FISH OFFERED
BY NEWSPAPER AT LOW PRIC
Hundreds of Ann Arbor residen
availed themselves of the oppotuni
presented yesterday by the Bay Ci
Fish company- through the Detr
News, to take a lab at the H. C. 2
When sales of fresh ocean fish 'at :
cepts a pound were opened this mor
in'g in the old Wurster creame
building, crowds were waiting a
during the day, a good share of ti
stock on hand was snapped up l
buyers. The sales will continue t
day.,
The offering -of fresh ocean fish
n*s of t+elinA^f of ihwlr-oiwa [

MINERS

BACK IN PITS
LIFTING OF
ORDERS

COUNTRY R
R ESTRlICTI[

NEARLY 75 PER CE1
OF DIGGERS ATV
Control of Situation May B
Railroad Administration Fol
Garfield's Resignatiou
(By Associated Press
Washington, Dec. 12.-Reg]
rectors of railroads were given

ity tonight by Dir
to remove restrict
light, heat and p
coal as soon as
warrants.
The regional dl
authorized to recto:

fuel

held from 11 to
the law build-

will hold their
-together meet-
the main din-}
The speakers
be Dean M. E.
n W. H. Butts,
>f the engineer-

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