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December 07, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-12-07

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THE MICHIGAN.DAILY

..

,

MMERS
CLASSES.

6 CAMPUS
TO BE

LEAGJES
ORGANIZED

MITCHELL PRESENTS NEW
FRATERNITY SPORT PLAN
lillUHLL Ill L i HL4

Surprise
widdle in

When He
40

GS LOWER 80 YARD
AY MARK BY 24 SECONDS
n swimmers showed up in
in the final informal swim-
t, held in the city Y. IVY. C.
ay afternoon. In this meet,
>reparatory for the D. A. C.
t Friday night, the first year
'e consistent and better baf-
.ad, due probably to their
lar training. The final count
Dints for eacA team, which
not include the 20 yard
in which the yearlings took

All Races Fast
NValentine of the fresh team pulled
the big surprise of the meet when he
pushed ahead of Dinwiddie in the 40
yard free style. The first year men
lowered the 80 yard relay 'record 2-5
of a second when they finished tle
race in 38 2-5 seconds. Dinwiddie and
Hyde, the latter of the fresh, had a
fast race in the 100 yard free style,
Dinwiddie winning when he went in-
to the lead in the last lap.
Dinwiddie and Goldsmith were the
high scorers of the afternoon, both
taknig one first and one second. Din-
widdie fon the 100 yard free style,
and was second in the 40 yard free
style. Goldsmith won the fancy div-
ing and finished right behind John-
son in the 20 yard back stroke. Hyde
placed in three events, getting two-
thirds and one second.
Final Results
Final results-40 yard free style
won by Valentine; second, Dinwid
die; third, Settle. Time, 121 1-5 sec-
onds. Twenty yard back stroke won
by Johnson; second, Goldsmith; third,
Myers. Time, 18 seconds. Forty
Yards breast stroke won by Babcock;
second, Loeb; third, Hyde. Time, 30
1-5 seconds. One hundred yard free
style, fron by Dinwiddie; second,
Hyde. Time, 1:43 4-5 seconds. -Only
two entries. Fancy diving won by
Goldsmith, 84.4; second, Grayson,
76.6; third, Hyde, 60.6. Eighty yard
relay, won by freshmen; second, up-
per-classmen. Twenty yard free style
won by Settle; second, Levy and,.
Johnson, tied. Time,. 9 4-5 seconds.

Six interclass and interfraternity
athletic leagues will be organized by
the Athletic associaton this winter, on
the pattern of the football series just
closed. Basketball, bowling, and
hockey are the sports tobe used, the
officials intending to have two leagues
in each, one for fraternity teams and
one for classes.
Arrangements are being made with
the Union to use the bowling alleys
for the competition 'in. that sport. It
may be pssible to ;fix practice hours
for basketball with Dr.Maytat Wat-
erman gymnasium,.
In order to avoid the last minute
rush that the football season ended
with, all entries must be in to E. D.
Mitchell, at the Athletic office, before
the Christmas vacation. Up until that
time any organization is welcome to
put in its application, but none wll
be received after. The present plan
is to open both class and fraternity
basketball as soon as possible, after
school starts in January. It is more
important that the fraternities put in
their names soon, as the number of
classes is approximately known.
As was the case In football, the
league will be on a straight elimination
basis, one defeat dropping the team
from the race. This will. hold for
both class and fraternity competition.
Prizes will be awarded at the close of
the season to the winning team. If
more than enough men are willing to
enter basketball in one class or
house, a second team can be put in,
but th'e players on one team cannot
play on the other team, even if that
team has has been dropped by. de-
feat.
Advent 0f Snou
Revives Old Sport
With the coJiing of the snow, a
sport as old as man himself was re-
vived on the campus. At least it is
almost as old as man himself. On see-
ond thought it does not seem very
likelythat Adam and Eve snowballed
:each other in the Garden of Eden, for
as we understand it, the valley of the
Tigris and the Euphrates is not the
most conduciver place in the world'to
blizzards.
However this may be, it still re-
mains that the gentle art of hurling
snow pellets came back into promin-
ence' as University sport Saturday.
One group that was much in evidence
as the shades of night drew on were
having a battle royal on State street
with the usual results to the' inno-
cent bystanders. It is to be said that1
there were no hard feelings exhibit-
ed by any of the latter outraged per-
sonages, chiefly because none of the
missiles happened to hit, that spot
which bears the same relation to the
temper of an ordinary mortal as did1
the heel to AchillE's,-that is, the back
of the neck. '.,
We hope that this good old-time
sport will not be allowed to languish
on the campus. Why not interclass
and interfraternity slowball fights?E
They would be much more spectacu-I
lar than bowling matches and should<
prove interesting to all onlookers, if
they didn't try to look too closely.
Altogether we think it an excellent
suggestion and well wtrth the deep
consideration of the intramural staff
and other campus authorities.

As a stimulus to campus athletics,
and thence to Varsity sport, E. D.
Mitchell of the intramural staff, has
announced a plan to bring out the
argest possible number from fra-
ternities and classes.
At the end of the year, the athletic
office will present a large loving cup
to the fraternity that has made the
best showing in all sports for the
current year. It will be an award/for
all-around efficiency, and not for a
win in any one line of athletic en-
deavor.
Points to All Entrants
All organizations that enter teams
in the leagues will be graded by
points according to the place that they
get in the race. Points will be given
to a house that merely enters a team,
as that shovs some interest in ath-
letics. In the mass athletic meet
that will be held in the spring every
man that enters will be given points,
so it is to the interest of the (rater-
nities that they get quantity as well as
quality for the track and field sports
at least.
Football, basketball, baseball, track,
bowling, and hockey are the branches
of athletics that will be used for com-
petition this year. The only eligibil-
ity rule that will be imposed is that
no man who has won a letter or an
'AMA" can be entered in the sport in
which he has won his insignia or in a
sport tlit he is trying for at the time
the fraternity competition is being
carried on. This applies to men on the
freshman squad as well as those out
for the Varsity.
Aim to Help Varsity
This method is hoped to have good
effects in regard to the men that come
out for the Varsity teams, and to
create a more general interest in in-
tercollegiate athletics. Seventeen
teams were in the football league, and
several players of ability were uncov-
ered by the series. It is certain that
many of these men will be given con-
sideration on next year's Varsity foot-
ball squad. What is true for foot-
ball will be true for other branches
of athletics.
JACKSON PICKED AS LEADER
OF CHICAGO ELEVEN FOR 1920
Chicago, Dec. 6. - Colville "Red"
Jackson was elected captain of the
University of Chicago football team
for 1920 at a meeting of the letter
winners of the squad Friday. His
brother, Philbrick, was captain of the
Chicago team in 1916.
Jackson is a tackle and has just
finished his second year as a regular
on the team. He first won a letter
in 1917, when he was a sophomore. In
this year he also won a letter in bas-
ketball, and would have made one in
track had he not left for service.'
The letter winners of the year
were: Captain Higgins, Stegeman,
MacDonald, Elton, Hinkle, Hutchin-
son, Graham, Jackson, Reber, Cole,
CrisleF;' Hanisch, McGuire, Pheney,
and Hallday.
CROSS COUNTRY HIKE WILL
TAKE PLACE MONDAY
Ten miles of hiking through the
snow to Barton dam is what tomorrow
afternoon has to offer to all Univer-
sity girls who will accept the invita-
tion.
In order that she may know wheth-
er or not enough will attend to make
up a party, Lois DeVries, '21, requests
all who are interested to call her by
telephone, 2325, before noon tomor-
row.
HARVARD TO AY FAR WEST
ELEVEN ON "EW YEAR'S DAY
Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 6. - Hiar-

vard's football squad has accepted an
invitation from one of the Pacific
coast universities to play at Pasadena
on New Year's day. Which team Crim-
son men are to play has not been,
definitely decided.
Bezdek Must Quit Grid to Lead Pirates
Pittsburgh, Pa., Dec. 6.-Hugo Bez-
dek; who piloted the Pittsburgh Na-
tionals for the last two seasons, can
have the job again in 1920 if he de-
sires, but will have to sever his con-
nections with Penn State college.
While he was in the city last week
Bezdek and President Barney Drey-i
fuss conferred on the managership for
next season.

'LOVING CUP'
MAKING

GOES TO SOCIETY
BEST SHOW.
ING

FRESHMAN GIRLS
HAVE STRONG FIVE
Present indications predict a good
'basketball team for the freshman
girls. If early practices are a stand-
ard from which to judge, the fresh-
man women ought to turn out several
strong teams. They have 'the ad-
vantage over other classes in num-
bers; but the disadvantage of lack of
ppevious training.
Basketball practice for all classes
has started in preparation for the
class series to be held the latter part
of February. Instead of playing only
four gamnes as in previous years, the
series will be lengthened to eight this
year. The winning class will be
'awarded a silver loving cup, donated
by. Wright, Kay and company of De-
troit. The cup is on exhibition in
the physical director's office in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
. Freshmen and sophomores will be
rivals in the indoor meet to be staged
the latter part of March. Two pre-
-iminary meets will be held, one for
each class, in which the girls will
qualify for the final -meet. Upper-class
(girls may enter fo Individual honor
points in apparatus work.
The annual demonstration will take
place at the time of the Schoolmast-'
ers' convention, the last of March.
Floor work, folk dancing, and march-
ing are the three phases of the dem-
onstration. The apparatus work will
be the same as that practiced all year.
Three judges will decide upon the
'winning ?tlass.
One hundred honor points are
awarded for the meet and demonstra-
tion; 40 for the class winning the
meet,.and 60 for the class winning the
demonstration.
STEEL STRIKE QUIETEST
IN HISTORY, SAS FITCH
LABORERS ONLY DESIRE REMEDY
OF DEFECTS'ON PRESENT
SITUATION
"The present steel strike has been
the most orderly strike in the history
of organized labor. Nowhere can be
found traces of revolutionary motives
so commonly found in strikes where
radical men are involved," said John
A. Fitch, of the New York school of
social work, in a lecture on "The
Steel Industry" Friday in room 101
of the Economics building.
Leaders Not Bolsheviks
"Those men who are leading in the
steel strike are not Bolesheviks,. as
many people imagine," said Mr. Fitch.
"They are on the contrary men with
the best interests of their fellow men
at heart and are striking only with
the intention of remedying certain de-
fects of the present situation.
"The steel industry has been less
susceptible to the labor unions than
have the other great industries on ac-
count of its peculiar features. It is
necessarily a continuous process. The
mills must be kept going at all times,
for if the blast furnaces were allowed
to cool they would possibly burst and
endanger the lives of the men work-
ing near them. Previous to the pres-
ent time most of 'the larger steel
mills have practiced the two-shift
system and the laborers have suffered
needlessly from this practice. From
the smaller mills come reports that
with an eight hour day more effi-
ciency has resulted as well as bet-
ter profits.
Kept Unionism Out
"The corporations have been striv-

ing to keep unionism out of the steel
industry, and prior to the late war
their efforts were fairly successful.
The coming' of war gave them their
long sought opportunity to remedy
conditions and the strike was the re-
sult of their actions. Today the strike
seems almost broken, abut it is my
opinion," continued Mr. Fitch, "that it
is only settled temporarily and will
soon break out again."
"Foreigners seem to be quicker to
strike than the American laborer. Per-
haps this is due to the fact that they,
receive lower wages, together with
the -fact that they are less familiar
with the history of the industry. No
un-American practices on the part of
the steel striker have been seen and
It is the hope that they will soon
come to some understanding. No de-
cision will be lasting which has not
the real interests of man at heart,"
concluded Mr. Fiske.
The lecturer spoke Friday morning
to the class on Labor Problems on
the subject, "Some Aspects of the
Labor Question."

Skating--Skiing--Tobogg$ning--Snow--Sho4
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Get a Victrola! Get it this Christmas!. On easy
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110 S. MAIN STREET

WINTER SPORTS

I A1
-S

Ts
\',

oI

I I:

r+
41

I

ZUPPKE SIGNS FIVE-YEAR
CONTRACT TO COACH ILLINOIS
Bob Zuppke has signed a five-year1
contract with the University of Illi-
nois to act as football mentor at that'
institution.
This announcement assures the Ur-
bana school good teams for five more'
seasons at least, as most critics-firmly
believe that Zuppke can mold a fast
aggregation out of any sort of mate-
rial. His ability as a coach was nev-
er better demonstrated than in the
season just passed, when his pro-
teges walked off with the Conference
honors. Starting the season with
good, but not extraordinarily fine,
material, Zuppke Whipped his men in-
to such shape that they were able to
go through the schedule with but one
defeat, and that an early-season one.
It is said that the Illinois coach
works his men harder than any other
mentor in the Conference. Long scrim-
mages almost every day are the rule
,with Zuppke, with-the result that his
men are hard as nails all the time.

HOW OLD ARE YOU? NO MATTER? PLAY BILLIARDS
No matter how many years.- you have tarried on earth, you ar
young if you like to PLAY. And PLAYING helps to keep that
feeling .and youthful look in men who are of mature years.
of the GREAT men of the world-authors, senators, lawyers,
ministers-find in BILLIARDS a most joyous relaxation and :
tion. Make HUSTONBROS. your "club." Make thisa regular
hng pl ace for yourself and friends. You will find just the right
phere here to make your evenings enjoyable.
HUSTON BROS.
BILLIARDS AND BOWLING, CIGARS AND CANDIES
CIGARETTES AND PIPES
"We try to treat you Right"

New Class Pipes just
Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.

received.

Do
Your
Christmas

BUY'
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WARE

A select line of baked goods hot and
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We especially cater to banquets and-

Electrical Appliances are always useful.
They are always labor savers.
A home is not complete unless it has an
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These useful gifts cost no mote than the
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Make your selection now while all the
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AND HAVE NO
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L. C. Smith, Corona and second-
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Nickels Arcade.-Adv.
"CREOLE PRALINES," Tice's Drug

Gilbert's Chocolates for Xmas, 1 to
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Shopping
Early

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Typewiiting promptly and neatly
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