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December 06, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

II

* etion
!ichigan?.

I

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"The old traditional hammer and
tongs football,. in which Yale's name
was paramount on the gridiron for
generations of Eli players, has gone
by the boards, not to return. Open
play, represented by the forward
pass, is the new order of things on
the football field and Yale must ac-
cept the change, however difficult it
is for her mentors who have been
brought up on the old system. Yale
has learned this lesson, we hope.
"The Yale team, up to the limit of
its knowledge and preparation for
emergencies, conducted itself on the
finest of traditional, athletic models.
There was no falling off in its fight-
ing spirit, nor in its undergraduate
backing. The team deserved a bet-
ter record than its opponents permit-
ted it to make. We offer our congrat-
ulations to both Princeton and Har-
vard and propose a better seaiwn next
year for Yale."

I&&-

day nigh
en togetlh
y, Tuesda
next wee
head of t
Dnents mI
Lv for the

es -Yale Alumni Weekly.
ht. The above excerpt was-printed as an
ier editorial in the Tlganksgiving number'
ay, othetYale Alumni Weekly. Practi-
ek. t ally the same opinon was expressed
.he by that paper after the Boston col-
ha lege defeat, but adverse criticism ap-
ay pearing in the Yale Daily News in the
form of communications from the un-
es dergraduates soon hushed this matter
es up. With the season over, however,
to and' every one searching for the cause
to of the disastrous year on the gridiron,
nit the Alumni Weekly again voiced its
'he opinion in the matter and this time it
he seems to have found many followers
se both among the graduates and stu-
nd dents.

IM

Editor Michigan Daily:-7
Dear' Sir-As an alumnus of the
University of Michigan who is desir-
ous of having Michigan retain its here-
tofore supremacy of the West, I en-1
close an article which appeared in theE
Yale Alumni Weekly, with the re-,
quest that you publish same with the
caption, Doesn't Yale's Shoe Fit Mich-
igan?
It appears to me that, the popular
sportaof passing the buck is gaining
popularity in Michigan football cir-
cles. The Athletic association through
P. G. Bartelme has more or less shown
that it was not the cause of this Year's
cataistrophe. Yost in a number of ar-
ticles has more or less demonstrated
that he is not personally at fault. By
the simple 'method of elimination -we
arrive at the answer that the trouble
lies either with the faculty or with
the students and alumni. The faculty
with the customary flourishes relin-
quishes all claim to responsibility'for
ineligibility, The alumni maintain
that they have been doing all in their
power to induce prospective athletes
to choose Michigan for their col-
1e4Iate work. That leaves the, stu-
dents to shoulder the blame. I per-,
sonally do not believe that the stu-
dents are at fault. It appears to me
that Michigan has been slowly falter-
ing by the wayside. As expressed in
the article, the old traditional hammer
and tongs football has gone by the
boards.
I' feel that now Is the time to get
at this matter and ferret out the. cause
of Michigan's downfall. This year's
team fought l1ke any other Michigan
team, every man in every play, regard-
less of personal injuries. However, no
sane man could overlook the fact that
our team has been lacking in knowl-
edge of, the newer type of football--
forward passes, shift plays, end runs
-and it is only with the aid of these
that the opposing teams have been
able to conquer the team representing
our own Alma Mater. Here's hoping
that those who actually determine
Michigan's athletic policy, will take
the necessary steps to provide the
means 'and facilities for Michigan re-
gaining her former western football
supremacy.
E. M. MURPHY, Grad.
HONOR POINTS 0ID TO
WOMEN IN ATHLETICS
ALL GIRLS HAVE CHANCE - TO
WIN MICHIGAN
, , INSIGNIA

Skating-Skiing--Tobogganing--Snow--Shoeing
We Have Supplies For All These Sports
GEO J. oMOE
"SPORT SHOP"
711 NORTH UNIVERSITY AVE'

Thisis a
one which
regularly.

fully, and enumerating the various the two teams opposed each other the
ways in which points are won, mayI University aggregation won rather
be procured at the office in Barbour, easily by a score of 8 to 0, but since
gymnasium. then the Ypsi team has been playing
strong De'troit and Canadiai outfits
MICHIGAN SOCCER TEAM MEETS and has improved considerably, so that
YPSI NORMAL SCHOOL AGAIN the coming contest should prove much
moreevenly matched than the first
Soccer enthusiasts 'will have a one. It is hoped that another game
chance to witness a fast contest in . can 'fe arranged with some Detroit
that sport when Ypsilanti Normal team for the following Saturday.
comes here next Wednesday for a
game with the Michigan team on Fer- See Weber's assortment of fancy
ry field. In the last game in which chocolates, at Cushing's.-Adv.
II WINTER SPORTS I

IN THI;
Have
you're t

and Candi,
S"We try b

bottom
and dro.
around"
You'll
a gam

so wvv

a 16th of January Western Re-
ollege of Cleveland will -a-
Waterman gym. On the fol-
night, Saturday, January 17,
University opens the Confer-
hedul'e here. A week later the'
journeys t6 Chicago for a
n Saturday, January 24. The

i/

versil y of Wisconsin. Again it will
spend its week-end away from home
and goon farther west until it strikes.
Minn( apolis. Minnesota will be the
oppon ?nt there on Monday, Feb. 16.
At the end of that week the squad
will return home for a game with Chi-
cagq at Waterman gym on Saturday,
Feb. 21.. On the last day of Febru-
ary the team-goes to Lansing for its
second contest with M. A. C.'

ill stay int
id and wi

that vicinty over the Monday, March 1, Illinois comes
ill meet Illinois at here. Saturday, March 6, of that same
ay night, the 26th. week will also see Wisconsin at the
ne and here take on gym. The second game with the Goph-
and Ohio State on ers is set for the night of Monday,
t day of January. February 8. The last two Conference
in, Feb. 14 - ganies are away from home. It will
f February the first play Indiana in a return game at
Saturday, the 14th. Bloomington on Friday, March 12. On
perform at Madison, its way home.it will stop atColumbus,
it will meet the Uai- (Continued on Page Si;)
in now spend ypur leisure

nf

ite Billi-
m Cam-

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AM ERIAN
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i:: CIGARETTES:: CANDIES
514 East William Street

I

0

THE NEW YORK f
CHAMBER MUSIC
SOCIETY /

Under the honor point system every
girl in the University Interested in
athletics has the opportunity of win-
ning a Michigan insignia. The Wom-
en's Athletic association under this
system 'offers three different types of
insignia for the accumulation of dif-
ferent numbers - of athletic honors.
These honors may be kwon In various
ways, all athletic work outside of the
required gymnasium course receiving
a stated number, of points. For the
accumulation of 30 honors a girl re-
ceives a sleeveband with insignia, for
60, a silver pin -with insignia, and for
100 of these points a sweater with in-
signma.
Many Opportunities
There are so many different ways
in which points may be acquired that
a girl may follow,; her. own particular
taste in selecting the way in which to
win them. Thus a girl who is inter-
ested In hockey may accumulate many
of them through this sport. A definite
number of points are given for hours
spent in skating, skiing, tennis and
walking, and membership on all class
teams- Is rewarded. in this manner.
Points are also given for the keep-
ing of"'a hygiene schedule. This is a
card prescribing a certain number of
hours' sleep, and other definite rules
for health. When a girl has lived in
accord with its requirements for 28
days she receives an hopor point.
Creates Interest in Sports
In these and many other ways points
may be accumulated. The purpose of
the system is obvious. It encourages
girls to participate in many athletics
outside of their required gymnasium
work, and promotes a spirit of friend-
ly rivalry among them. Dorothy
Jonds, '20, has charge of the honor
point system, and says "The Athleti
association is enthusiastic about th
plan of interesting the girls in athlet-
ics."
Leaflets explaining the system mor

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Foremost for Style

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CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN
AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG

--r

SUPERB MUSICIANS

11

Brand Clothes, because of their
quality, naturally represent the vogue. The fine
ermits an expression of style that is lasting.
opied in design by others, the inner construction
t by comparative appearance when new, and
after wearing.
e all-wool and many of exclusive patterns.
rades of clothinv flooding the market, look for this label as your gide. Go to Sty'le Hea4qauarte&,t
ALFRED DECKER & COHN, Makers
In Canada, SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES, Limited
Chicago New York Montreal

Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor

:nday, December 15
8P. M.
FIRST AND SECOND VIOLINS, VIOLA, 'CELLO,
OUBLE BASS, FLUTE, CLARINET; OBOE,
BASSOON AND FRENCH HORN

Serious, Very Fine and Beautiful Program
E flat major (Piano, Oboe, Clarinet, French
3assoon) ...:...Beetoven
B minor (Clarinet, Violins, Viola, 'Cello) .......Brahms
Impressions of a Holiday" (Piano, Flute,
............ .......... Goossens
A CAMARA (all eleven instruments).......Wolf-Ferrari
0, $1.50, $2.00;. for the Course including concerts by
Levitzki (Jan. 23), Carolina Lazzari (Feb. 28), and. Trio
ce, Flute, Harp, and 'Cello (Mar. 30), $2.00, $2.50, $3.00,
a sale at the University School of Music, Ann Arbor.
INTERURBAN'CARS FOR YPSILANTI PATRONS

-4'

i~f (Wauertk

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- ).I
' _,

CTRIC SHOP EVERYTHING

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