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December 05, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-12-05

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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SPIRE

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58,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENTS

INTERVIEW
ON BEFORE
[ECING BREAK
LEVENTD PARTICIPA-
[N MEXICAN AF-

Sensation Of'Year'"Promised y
Brilliant "Red Feather" Staging

FAIR
AS INCLUDED
1 EEPING MOVE
and Hitchcock Chosen
Vith NaIon's Head

1

(By H. Hardy Heth)
Brilliant staging coupled with some
of the finest university talent in the
country will make Ann Arbor's first
mammoth dramatic production-"Red
Feather," by Charles Klein and Regi-
nald de Koven-the sensation of the
year. Special scenery is now being
designed by Carl Brummell after some
of the futurist patterns of the Fol-1
lies. Expensive lighting effects, mov-
ing clouds, a rippling lake and a ship
that sails, are a few of the spectac-
ular features that will delight Michi-
gan audiences on the nights of Dec.
11, 12, .and 13.
To Have Michigan's Largest Cast
This first all-campus production has1
a cast larger than any other in the
history of Michigan. Twenty-six roles
enacted by faculty and 'students, a
chorus of 56 men and women ,nd an
orchestra of 30 pieces, will make up
the gigantic theatrical personnel. E.
Mortimer Shuter, director, who last
year directed the Union opera, says:
"This is positively the biggest thing]
done by. university amateurs. Some'
of the artistic ability already displayed
by the cast would rival any profes-:
sional production. In fact, a travel-

ing organization could not afford to
carry so many high grade performers.
Michigan people should realize this
thing could scarcely be done anywhere
else in the country."
Song and Dance Hits Numerous
Two hundred and thirty-one cos-
tumes will be made and executed by
Van Horn of Philadelphia, .while spe-
cial draperies have been ordered from
the Beaumont-Scenic Studios, New
York. Solo and duo dancing will es-
tablish itself in this new era of dra-
matic perfection. Perhaps the num-
ber, which is bound to win most ap-
proval is "The Little Milliner," a song
and dance in which; the milliner and
her six models appear. A duet, "To
Call Thee Mine," and a song, "The
Garden of Dreams," are among the
more artistic favorites. Comedy se-
lections such as "The Tale of a High.
Born Rooster" and the novel "Legend
Song"-all about a humorous ghost-L
will be individual hits.
"Red Feather" is being produced by
the University Dramatic society with
special assistance from Earl V. Moore
of the University School of Music, and
the Michigan Union, which is acting
in a managing capacity..

on Problem
Associated Press)
n, Dec. 4.-Steps to obtain
intervie with President
e framing a senate policy
ed relations with Mexico

on fc

by the foreign]

The decision was made after Secre-
tary Lansing had dppeared before the
committed and, it was said by mem-
bers, had dislosed that because of the
President's illness he had not been
consulted by the state department in
its handling of the recent develop-
ments which have brought relations
between the two governments to a
serious stage.
- may see Wilson
At the White House tonight the
President's physician, Dr. Grayson,
said he saw no reason why the com-
zWttee's representatives, if they urg-
ently desired it, could not see Mr.
Wlson tomorrow. It was indicated
hat -the two members selected, Sn-
aos Fall, Republican, of New' ex-
leo, and Hitchcock, Democrat of Ne-
braska, would endeavor to do so.
Secretary Lansing wa said to have
told the committee that' the adminis-
tration was carfying out a well de-
fined policy for dealing more vigor-
ously with Mexicb and to have ques-
tioned the wisdom of any precipitat-
ed actIon at this time. %
The decision to take a more decisive
attitude against invasion of American
rights in the southern republic, Mr.
Lansing was quoted as saying, was
reached some months ago and now
was abdut to develop whether the Car-
ranza regime would accept or disre-
gard it. * He was -said to have added
that the administration was prepared
to go whatever length. was necessary
to enforce that policy.
Await Reply .
A reply is now awaited from Car.
ranza to the latest American note
requesting in-sharp terms the release
of William 0. Jenkins and -advices
reaching here today indicated that a
commission' might be asked for by
the Mexican 'president to settle the
dispute. Mr. Lansing, it was said, did
not indicate what -course- this govern-
ment might take should the reply
prove unsatisfactory,, but was very
emphatic in his declaration that the
United States was ready to shoulder
any consequences hich might result
from its demands for protection of
American rights.
BARTSLME FAVORS
PROBE BY ALUMNI
That examinations into athletic con-
ditions at Michigan now being con-
ducted by the committee of five from
the Detrtit Alumni association may be
expected to bring beneficial results,
is the opinion of Athletic Director P.
G. Bartelme.
"The most important requisite of
such an examination," said Mr. Bar-
telme, "is that the committee take its
time and go into jhe situation thor-
oughly. I think the committee ap-
pointed at the Detroit smoker intends
to use the most careful methods of in-
vestigati n. It will be a good thing
for all the facts connected with Mich-
igan athletics to be learned and given
full publicity."

PRESS HUTCHINS GOES-.
TO NEW YORK. MEETING
WILL PRESIDE OVER BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF AMERICAN
UNIVERSITY UNION
President Harry B. Hutchins left
Thursday afternoon for New York,
where he will preside Friday as chair-
man at the meeting of the governing
board of Trustees of the American
University Union in Europe.
President Hutchins was chosen to
head the board at a meeting held on
Nov. 22 in New. York. At that time
an en4dire reorganization of the di-
recting personnel of the Union took
place, but action 1 to future work
of the Union was left for the meeting
todw.
No advance information as to the
function which the Union will per-
form under peace conditions could be
secured from President Hutchins, who
said no advance policy could be an-
nounced as yet, and that it would be
necessary to 'await the discussion
which would take place at- the meet-
ing before anything could be learned
about plans for the future. He prophe-
sied, however, that important develop-
ments would probably be a#nounced
as a result of the meeting.'
To Dedicate New
Organ A t Service
Dedication of the new three man-
ual, electro-pneumatic organ in the
First Congregational church will take
place at 10:30 next Sunday morning
with appropriate ceremonies.
The new instrument, built by the
Austin company, has 34 speaking
stops, while in the consoleeprepara-
tion has been made for 13 additional
registers to be installed when the or-
gan is transferred to the larger edi-
fice contemplated by the Congrega-
tionalists.
It is said that there is not a set of
pipes in the new instrument, pedal
pipes excepted, that cannot be used as
a "solo" stop. The wooden "Bour-
dons," a pedl stop of rare quality, are
the only pipes reinstalled from the old
organ.
Special music will be rendered at
this service by the organist, Prof.1
Earl V. Moore, the soloists, and the

LACK OF COALCLOSE
FUEL SHORTAGE MAY NECESSI-
TATE CLOSING BUILDING
AT 6 O'CLOCK
Due to the uncertainty of the coal
situation President Harry B. Hutch-
ins has ordered that the University li-
brary be closed on Sunday. This rul-
ing will go into effect on Dec. 7 and
will continue until fufther notice, stat-
ed Librarian William W. Bishop yeb-
terday. It may also be necessary to
close the library at 6 o'clock, as was
done two years ago, if the present
crisis does not pass over.
Presept Supply Small
Although the University coal pile
now seems very large, 14 reality it is
only a small part of what is necessary
to keep the University running for
any length of time, according to Mr.
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent of
the buildings and grounds.
"There is no immediate danger,"
Mr. Pardon said, "but we will have to
practice the strictest economy lf we
are to continue to run for any length
of time. It may be necessary to close
all of the buildings during the Christ-
mas-vacation. Undoubtedly, not more
than a few rooms in each will be
heated." _
Consume 126 Tons Per Day
At the present time the University
is using about -125 tons of coal per
day and it is expected that 160 will be
used when the extremely cold weather
sets in. Mr. Pardon stated that much
heat was wasted by many of the in-
structors and in the dormitories by
leaving windows open when it was un-
necessary.
RED ARROWS IN UNIVERSITY
FORM 32ND DIVISION CLUb
A 32nd Division club was organizea
at a meeting held in the Union Wed-
nesday evening, attended by ex-mem-
bers of the division. Ted McKinney,
'22, was elected president of the club.
The organization, which is open only
to University men, will provide en-
tertainment for its members . in the
form of talks by prominent men.
Reighard to Address Zoologists .
Prof. J. E. Reighard, of the zoology
department, will have charge of the
Zoological club when it meets at 7:30

ANULSPOTLIGHT
APPEARS TONIGHT(
Musicians, Minstrels, and Magicians
on the Eight Act Progran-of l
Union Showc
FORMER OPERA SELECTIONS £
'TO BE PLAYED BY ORCHSTRA
With a program of eight acts the an-
nual Spotlight vaudeville will be
shown at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill aud.-
itorium.
Regarded by those in charge as one
of the stars of the performance is John
S. Wilson, ex-'18, who played in one
of the first jazz orchestras on the
campus in the Band Bounce of 1916.
His versatility on the piano is attest-3
ed to by the many who have heard
him in the tap room at he Union.
Wordless Dialogue a Feature
Id addition to selections on the
piano he will give some of his original
recitations.
Two black face acts are on the
schedule, the first of which will be
"Georgia Cotton-Tales," with T. A.
McKinney, '20, and George Lynn. '22,
at the piano. A "wordless" dialogue
is one of the features of this number.
The other darky act is the "Southern
Symphony Four."
Novel demonstrations of the mystic
art of magic a Ia Thurston will vie
with "Zallah" for first honors in
oriental splendor, while a soloist will
contest for supremacy in melody with
a marimbaphone player who. was for-
merly on the professional stage and
will play a march by Sousa, the noted
bandmaster, by special permission
from the composer. ' Because it is the
opinion of the committee that no
vaudeville is complete without a tum-
bling act the last number will dem-
onstrate the strength and quickness of
three artists with dumbells and on the
swinging bar.
Orchestra a Novelty
The orchestra wilt-be one of the
novelties of this year's show. It will
consist of 20 pieces of the regular
Union orchestra. The overture will
consist of selections from former
Michigan Union operas. This will be
the first campus entertainment of this
character to have a complete orches-
tra in the pit.
The tickets will be on sale today
on the campus and at the State street
book stores until 4 o'clock. The box
office at Hill auditorium will open at
7:15 o'clock for the final sale and the
performance will begin at 8 o'clock.
YOUR PART IN THE
SOLUTION OF THE
ATHLETIC PROBLEM
Michigan's comeback is scheduled
for the 1920, football season. Pro-
spects for a championship year look
good-on paper. But paper is a very
brittle substance and is liable to
break. It broke this year, when nine
star gridders were found to be inelig-
ible.
Nevertheless, the chances of a break
need not be risked at all by the Maize
and Blue in 1920 if the "service"
which Coach Yost has asked of every
Michigan man and woman is forth-
coming.
Football critics the country over

consider this year's football season
at Michigan in the same light as a"
race horse critic would consider a
sudden and temporary failure on the
part of- a winning horse to crqss the
tape in the lead. They are counting
on Yost to comeback next year.
But we know that the comeback
will not be forthcoming unless Yost
has something to work with. See to
it that he has.

AMERICANS TOLD
TO LEAVE MEXICO
(By Associated Press)
El Paso, Dec. 4.-Certain American
concerns operating in Mexico ordered
a border representative today to pre-
pare for getting their American em-
ployes out of Mexico. In some cases
definite instructions were given for
immediate withdrawal of American
employes from Mexico.
Names of these companies were
withheld,because of the possible dan-
ger it was said to employes in quitting
the' southern republic.
Danger to Americans in Mexico,
shnu)d diplomatic relations between
the two countries be broken off, has
been seriously discussed on the bor-
der inconnection with the Jenkins'
case. It was felt that an order from
the government such as was issued by
President Taft in 1912 ordering Amer-
icans to quit Mexico, would create an
ill feeling south of the border and
make for bloodshed.
UNSTINTED' PRAISE
WO0N, BY HE11FETZ
juterpretation of 19 Year Old Artist
Considered Best ofr
Season
ABSENCE OF EMOTION 'SHOWN
BY PITCH AND CLEAR TONE

STRIKING'S MINERS
MUST ANSWER NEW
FEDERALCHARGES
SPECIAL SESSION OF GRAND JURY
CALLED AT INDIAN.
APOLIS
CARRANZA ANSWER TO
JENKINS NOTE IS NEAR
Lever Food Control Act and Sherman
Anti-Trust Law Brought Into
Coal Case

(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Those are rare occasions in the ex-
perience of the critic which permit him1
to be unstinted In his words of praise,'
to express appreciation without a'
reservation, but Jascha Heifetz created'
that occasion last night when he
played in Hill auditorium before a ca-
pacity audience.
Artist 19 Years Old'
He possesses remarkable poire for
an artist 19 years old and his inter-
pretations will remain golden memo-
ries in the hearts of his listeners. His
playing lacks any outward sensa-
tionalism, if he is stirred by emotion
there is no visual sign of it, but it is
evident in his concentrated playing
which displays a combined sense of
clarity of tone, effortless technique,
and true pitch.
The program began with the sim-
ply "constructed harmonic D minor So-
nata of Handel's -which is of the old.
Italian school in"character.
Rapidity and liveliness of style dis-
tinguished the first movement of Wie-
niawski's D minor Concerto, which was
followed by the gracefully flowing Ro-
imanze terminating in the Gypsy styled
Finale and the effective closing Coda.
Played "Ave Maria"
With these two works as a founda-
tion the program proceeded with the
shorter numbers. The ever popular
"Ave Maria" and the Mozart Minuetto
with the E minor Chopin Nocturne
and Beethoven's tantalizing "Ruins of
Athens" with Auer arrangements com-
prised the second group.
The refined suavity of Mendels-
sohn's "La Ronde des Lutins," by Baz-
zini with its trills and finely developed
staccato passage work and up-bow
strokes would alone stamp Heifetz's
virtuosity.
He has a keen sense of pitch, in-
sisting that his concert piano be tuned
to 144 vibrations on the key of A.
"RED FEATHER" BOX OFFICE
SEAT SALE OPENS SATURDAY
Seats for "Red Feather" will go on
sale at 9 o'clock Saturday morning in
the Hill auditorium box office. The
office will be open until 12 o'clock and
from 2 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon.
The remaining seats will be handled
at the Whitney theater box office be-
ginning at 10 o'clock Monday morn-
ing. Mail orders will continue to be
filled at the Union in the order of
acceptance before the general sale.

(By Associated Press)
Indianapolis, Dec. 4. - Upon the
heels of the institution of contempt
of court proceedings against the of-
ficials of the United Mine Workers
of America, the government has tak-
en steps to broaden the steps in its
prosecution in connection with the -
strike of coal miners and will investi-
gate alleged violations of the Lever,
food control act and the Sherman
anti-trust law by miners, operators
and others.
Orders Special Jury
United States District Judge Ander-
son today ordered a specialsession
of the federal grand jury here net
Monday and immediately afterward a
statement was given out by United
States District Attorney L. Ert Slack
and Dan W..Simms, special distrit at-
torney, who is aiding in the injunc-
tion proceedings, declaring that the
time has arrived to determine "wheth-
er this is a government of law or a
group of men."
(By Associated Press)
Washington, De. 4.-The country as
a whole now is involved in coal ra-
tioning measures which have been
proposed to eke out supplies shorten-
ed by the nation- wide strike of bitu-
minous mine workers.
The flow of appeals to'the re-estab-
listied fuel administration showed gen-
eral alarm over the situation.
Shortage Acute
Middle western territory where the
shortage has become 'acute through
representatives .in congress demanded
that eastern seaports and New England
be compelled to share surplus - sup-
plies and live up to restrictions on
power and light consumption as dras-
tic as thos effective in the west.
Meanwhile the responsible heads of
the larger coal mintig concerns of the
country announced that they had
agreed to pay miners an a.lditional
sum of 11 cents per ton for coal min-
ed, basing'the figure on conditions In
thin vein areas," and thereby fixing
a scale for the entire country. This
more than carried out the proposal of
Fuel Administrator Garfield that the
coal miners be given a 14 per cent ad-
vance without - increase in the selling
price of coal, they asserted because
average figures showed that an ad-
vance of 1056 cents per ton would
meet the requirement.
Prop6se Open Shops
Proposals were made that the mine
operators adopt an aggressive policy
of fighting the strike by resuming pro-
duction on an "open shop" basis but
no definite stand-was- taken on a col-
lective policy. It was said the major-
ity preferred to await the result of the
new efforts by the government to
prosecute the leaders of the. striking
mine workers in the federal court for
violating the federal Lever law.
PHOTO .F SPRINX MEMBERS
TAKEN AT NOON TODAY
Members of Sphinx, junior literary
society will meet today at 12:20
o'clock at Spedding's studio, to have
their photographs taken for the Mich-
iganensian.

chorus. Admittance to the church o'clock tonight in room 231 in tie
may be had only until 10:40 a. m. Natural Science building. Professor
At the evening service Professor Reighard and other members of the
Moore will render a recital and the club will speak. The meeting will be
choir will sing Gounod's "Gallia." open to visitors.

k. ..

_

I

TICKETS,
50 cents

SPOTLIGHT VAUDEVILLE
TONIGHT
HILL AUDITORIUM 8. P. M.

8
BIC

at
State

ACTS

J

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