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November 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAY AND NIGHT '
SERVICE

PRICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1919.

PRICE

M1

t

__

Scrub
nto Society

IT IIS UP TO AMERICA
TO SATE THE WORLD
-CHARLES EWALD
LARGE BANQUET HELD BY CHAM-
BER OF COMMERCE AT
UNION r

Initiated into th
'ov. 25. The ne
Bennett, M. F
n, C. N. Johnsoi
Lukins, P. Mc
ck, F. R. Store
). Van Wagone
ety is an hono
bor engineers an
en by their can

10
B.
n,
C-
sr,

r, "If America cannot save the world'
now, the world will not be saved," said
x- Mr. Charles J. Ewald, '02, when quot-
Ld ing the sentiments of a prominent
- South American statesman, at the ban-
M quet given last night by the Ann Ar-
ig bor Chamber of Commerce.
d- The great banquet hall at the Union
ofwas filled with men attending the.
es function. The dinner was servedtat
re 6:15, followed by the program of the'
ar evening. -

PRES, HUTCHINS FATORS
THANKSGIYIG 'SERTICES
HOPES ALL STUDENTS IN CITY
WILL ATTEND SERVICE
THURSDAY
President Harry Vi. Hutchins when
asked his attitude toward the services
to be held Thanksgiving day said, "I
am thoroughly in sympathy with the
movement for the holding of-services
in Hill auditorium on Thanksgiving
day. They are planned for the bent-
fit of the students and I hope that all
who are-in the city Thanksgiving day
will attend.
Large Attendance Expected
With the'President and the faculty
supporting the movement and a pro-
gram which is to include well known
speakers and music by the Varsity
band and Glee club, the men in charge
of the services 'to be held at 11 o'clock
Thanksgiving morning expect a large
attendance.
The meeting will start promptly at
11 o'clock and end promptly at 12, so
that students will not be late for din-
ner.
Program Announced
The program has been announced
by Carl Johnson, '20, president of the
Student council and a member of the
committee in charge of the services, as
follows:z
Organ prelude -.........Earle V. Moore
(Continued on Page Six)

-

took place in
Iobert Grind-
master. The
were: Prof.
an, '20E, and

Allegiance Changing
Mr. Ewald was the chief speaker off
the evening. In his speech he said
Anerica was being regarded in a new
light by the South American rpub-
lics and that they were changing their
former allegiance in cusoms and
ideas ,from Europe to the United
States. "Before the war and for-many
years previous, the attitude of South
America toward the States. was ex-
pressed very well in the statement of
an' army officer to me when I first
went there 16 years ago. He said, 'We
consider the Monroe Doctrine as con-
strued by the United States as, The
Americas for North America.' The
(Continued on Page Six)

11 Pilgrims Cross
Blistering Sands
Eleven-weary seekers after the rid-
dle of'the Sphinx, with blistered feet
and parched-throats, successfully trav-
ersed, yesterday afternoon, the dis-
heartening trail that leads, over the
shifting sands of the African desert
to the spot where the.great dumb idol
waits in the shadow of thb pyra-
mids.
Fortitude had its true reward and
the following juniors are now partak-
ers with the Sphinx of the knowledge
that belonged to Ramases and the
Pharoahs: C. M. Campbell, Barry
Stuart, Boyd Logan, W. F. Angell, D.
J,, Porter, Harold Lindsey, Frank No-
vak, Jack Dunn, Robert McKean, G.
L. Rourke, and Paul .Burkholder. J.
P. Hart, '20, who was to have become
a member of the junior literary honor
society in the spring of 1917 but could
not be initiated before entering the
service, was made a worshiper of the
graven figure without undergoing the
usual ordeals.
In spite of the ;.fact that, in the
words of the songster, theadesert of
Sahara ceased to be a "land of milk
and 'honey" when "King Ramases
passed a law 7,000 years ago that
Egypt should go dry," the neophytes
were proffered a very creditable re-
past at the Union after the initiation.
Harry Carey, '20, Carl Johnson, '20,
Bruce Millar, '20, and Fred Petty, '21,
gave short talks. Prof. Claude H. Van
Tyne, who' was on the program as a
speaker, was unable to be present be-
cause of illness. ,
RADICALS GO0ON STRIKE

PLAN TO SECUTHIISM
.BY CONFERI

PRQVISON MADE TO ASSIST
IN SECURING EMPLOY-
MENT
COMMITTEE TO LOO
UP RECORDS OF ?
All Fraternity Men Will Get in
with Home Town Condi-
tions
With a view toward doing
share to assist in bringing mor
class athletes to Michigan, the
fraternity Conference, at a s
meeting held last night, unanin
adopted a plan, drawn up by
Johnson, '20, which, isxpected
much toward solving this prob
Under this plan all fraternit
will get in touch with the athlet
uation in their hose cities
through their personal knowled
by writing the coaches and
writers in these, cies. In thi
ner they will obtain the names
men who have actually start
athletics, and are ready to ent(
lege.

ATE
6 LIST

the ne

Pu
II

NATION-WIDE RIL STRIKE
RESULT FROM SLCH-a MEET

NO DAILY FRIDAY

"I

Serious Attention Given Gathering of
Union Officials Who Want
Walkout Dec. 1
DELEGATES SAY NO ACTION
DEFINITELY TAKEN AS YET

'1
I
.t
3
1
^1
'M
+'

There

be no Iaily issued
114g, Nov. 28.

(By.. Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 26.-A hunger strike
was coupled with a "silence" strike
today by 73 radicals at Ellis Island in
an effort to have removed an iron bar-
rier separating them from visiting
relatives.

Will Look Up R~eeords
It is probable that these nai
be handed over to a central
tee, which will 'nvestigate the
of the men. Those whose reco:
rant further attention will
written to by men from their h,
this way it is expected to ,est
personal toucht which the 'Co:
believes will be of the utmo;
The matter will not be allowei
after one letter has been
Those men who enter into co
dence- with athletes will be
to keep in touch with the
throughout the year, and to
them that they should 'enter
gan.
Committee to Assist Me
The plan it is tho ght will
;vide for a committee which
sist such men as need employ
make their entering college
It will be the duty of this cc
to see that athletes who so d,
provided with' suitable work
A committee was appointed
out the specific details of 1
which it is hoped will be dor:
near future.

.1

as he
to
He
the
cur-
f the
soon

4 If
Roosevelt Jtay
Give Talk ,Here
Lt.-Col. Theodore Roosevelt will
speak in Ann Arbor if plans now be-
ing fostered by James G, Frey, '20,
materialize.
Frey was a delegate from a Penn-
sylvania post of the American Legion
at the Legion's first convention, held
in Minneapolis on Armistice day. At
that time he had the opportunity. of
meeting Colonel Roosevelt, and he
took it upon- himself to ask the col-
onel whether he world consider vis-
iting Ann Arbor to give a talk. Al-
though he had already refused num-
erous delegations which had ap-
proached him on the same mission,
Roosevelt said that he would be glad
to come to Ann Arbor providing a{
suitable date could be arranged.
As yet no definite time has been
agreed on, but Frey is in correspond-
ence with Colonel Roosevelt, and feels
that he will be able to arrange a sat-
isfactory date.. University authorities
will not say anything on the matter
due to the present lack of definite in-
formation, but it is understood that
if the plans can be so arranged that
there is no conflict of events, Frey

his crisis
ny of the
tntry are

(By Associated Press)-
.Chicago, Nor. '26.--National lead-
erp of the four great railway brother-
hoods held a secret session today at
which the insistance of many local
unions that a general strike of all,
(railway workers in the United States
be called by Dec. 1, to enforce de-
mands for increase in pay was given
serious attentipn, according to in-
formation obtained tonight fron un-
ion railway men.
Especial Puirpose
It was said by one union official that
many of the delegates who, are now
in Cleveland went there for the spec-
ific purpose of fpreing the general
.committee to 'call a nation-wide
strike.
It became known tonight that the
Kansas City local of the brotherhood
of railway trainment had telegraph-
ed national officials of their organiza-
tion asking permission to call a strike
of trainmen and yardmen tomorrow.
It was reported that the national of-
ficers replied in such a way as to leave
the question entirely open and sub-
ject to the decision of local officials.
Nothing Definite
The union officials of Chicago, from
whom the information was obtained,
stated so far as they were aware the
secret conference in Cleveland had
not yet reached the point where re-
solutions or motions for the strike
actually had been presented but that
the discussion concerning it today,
according to -their information was,
favorable .for the project and that
the tieup would be expected within
tfree days. A similar announcement
was made today at the newly organiz-
ed' labor party here .

Plan Escape
The barrier was erected after dis-
covery that several Reds planned es-
-cape by exchanging clothes with
friends and after some visitors - had
passed revolvers to the radicals.'
In a letter to the house emigration
committee which is in New York in-
vestigating the emigration and de-
portation system they reiterated that
they would not attend deportation'
hearings held by emigration inspect-
ors and would go on a hunger strike
in addition. Three summons to the
dining room were unanswered. Drink-
ing water"and oratory had been their
only diet tonight for 24 hours.
Refuse Answer
About a half dozen voluntarily at-
tended hearings but joined in the hun-
ger strike. One attended a hearing
but refused to answer questions.
The strikers with the exception of
two young women are segregated in a
large room. All are anxious to be
deported to Soviet Russia or "go there
voluntarily.
Custo ms In, Play

e rather than let the
ie government coffers
Many of these large
doing so much adver-
d on Page Six)'
Pargmient
To Cerci

"To go to France is considered a dif-1
ilt undertaking by most students in
merican universities," said Mr.
ichaeLPargment'in an informal ad-
ress before a meeting of the Cer-
e Francais in their rooms last
ight, "but in reality the trip is but
ttle more difficult or expensive than
ie from New York to California."
Mr. Pargment -stated that a student
ho had studied French for only two
ears would experience no difficulty
i understanding the language or mak-
g himself understood at the end of
six weeks' stay in France if he
ould make use of every available op-
ortunity to converse in French. An-
ther fact brought out in the address.
'as that in Paris, numbering half the
opulation of New York, there are
stablished exactly 140 public libra-
ies.
"So large is the Louvre, which would
ractically cover our campus," said
[r. Pargment, "and so numerous are
s art collections that if one were to
pend only a minute befgre every
ainting or sculpture, it wo ld neces-
itate the spending of. three months
f actual .time to see everything in

can obtain Hill auditorium for the
talk.
Your Part In the
Solution of the
Athletic Problem

Will you permit a.repetition of the
football situation this winter? From
present indications such is likely to
happjen unless something is done.
Coach -Mather, the mentor of the
Varsity basketball squad announced
yesterday that there is a shortage of
men for the quintet squad.. "Surely
-there are more than 30 men who can
play basketball in this school," he
says, and rightfully, so. Shortage of
material was blamed for the failure'
of the football season. Will it spoil
the five man game for Michigan?
Take Coach Yost's advice. Per-
form a "real service" for your:school.
Go out for the game if you can; If
not, talk Michigan to that athlete-
in your home town when you go hpme
for Thanksgiving. Talk Michigan to
him when you go home Christmas.

i.
Reach Partial Agreement
Cleveland, Nov. 26.-Five hundred
general'chairman- of the four princi-.
pal railroad brotherhoods in confer-
ence here to consider the offer of Di-
rector General Hines granting time
and one-half for overtime in slow
freight service and a uniform 16 hour
rule for crews h'eld away from home
terminals today voted to accept the
"away from home 'rule," but did not
reach a vote on the overtime propos-
ition, which many delegates bitterly
opposed.
From an authoritive source it was
slearned that in all probability the del-
.egates will reject the offer of time and
one-half for overtime in slow freight
service in tomoriow's meeting.
The railroad administration offer is
in response ,to the brotherhoods re-
quest for. an increase in wages of
approximately 50 per cent.

Cosmopolitan club will present a
varied program in the All-Nation en-
tertainment to be given in Hill au-
ditorium the latter part of January.
This year's entertainment, which]
will be produced under the directidn
of Mr. George Wilner, will consist
of a prologue and six short plays
written around an outline prepared
.by K. Horiuchi, '20. It is pfunned
to present the humorous side of var-
ious' phases of foreign life, in the
plays, filling in the time between the
acts with musical and novelty num-
bers.
The program follows: Prologue by
Mr. Ralph Carson, '17; "Samurai on
Duty," by J. Adams, '20; "Lifein the
Latin Quarter," by Mr. E. L. Hackes;
"A' Geogr'aphy Lesson in China," by
John Adams, '20; "His Majesty, the
King of Sahara," by Kelsey Guilfoil,
'20L; "A Mystery in London," by C.
Wilner, '21; and "Babel in Nagusaki,"
by Albert Jacobs, '21.
Prof. Bonner Addr'esses Acolyte Club
After a short business meeting
last evening the members of the
Acolyte club were addressed by Prof.
Campbell Bonner, who spoke on
"Methods and Aims of Comparative
Religion."

TAP ROOM CROWS
AT FRESHMAN- S
Freshmen crowded the Unit
room Tuesday night for a smol
sing. Every table was fillet
many men were standing up. T1
was ,spent in singing, playing
smoking "and drinking. A nun
men brought their musical instr
and several solos were -sung 1
men. Cronan and Randall we:
ular with Cronan singing ani
dall accompanying on the pian
Inability to sing- some of the
tional Michigan songs was not
each man was instructed to le
of them by next week, when
meeting will be held. Class'
urged more of the men to brit
instruments for the next smo
Interest was- aroused in tl
position to form a quartet and
orchestra, for which ample n
seemed available.
George Hurley, general secre
the Union, stated that he was w
isfied.with the meeting. "If thf
men continue in such a fashi
said, "they will begin to realil
Michigan really means. They
come better - acquainted amon
class, and in learning the si
the University, they will have
Michigan spirit. Every fr
should turn out for these.gath
BANQUET TENDERED TWEI
INITIATES OF CABI
Initiates of the Cabinet clul
number of 20 were given a bar
6:30 o'clock Tuesday night t
319 of tht Union. Rev. L. C.
gave an informal talk on the
er Aspects of University Life
Club members are from V
ton, D. C., and vicinity. In 1
club was discontpued on ace
the war, and has been reorgani
year.

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