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November 23, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

in

"!
-''

WD'5L

16 1

azed so that the
have a 140 foot
et and nearly 200
building, costing
), is being financ-
Womens' Board
he five thousand
Room Bible class.
as established at

Offering a fellowship in the department
of biology for the year 1919-1920 open
to graduates whose major study has
been either b'otany or zoology. The
annual stipend will vary from $400 to
$500, according to the qualifications of
the candidates.
The sugbessful candidate will be ex-
pected to do classroom and laboratory
~work amounting to about one-third
time and may take courses amount-
ing to two-thirds the normal amount
required of graduate students. .
Purdue Men To Study in France

r-thr
toom
tr a

ee years ago, Twenty-five men are to be sent from
class was Purdue. university to French univer-
go upon the sities. Fellowships of $1,000 will be
n, instructor. awarded. These fellowships are re-
sses has been newable for a second year. Men re-
it now they ceiving them will sail for France July
dquarters. 1 of next year.

y
.r,; ,

H ave

you

noticed the

V ISUI 1 W11 11IU ILWU5I11
SAYS 'NUMEROUS GIFTS REVEALi
VITAL INTEREST IN
ALMA MATER
Alumni 'of the University of Mich-
igan have shown themselves more
vitally, actively and intelligently inter-
ested in their alma mater than the
alumni of any other state university,
if we may take the many alumni gifts
to the University as evidence,'accord-
ing to Mr. Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, gen-
eral secretary of the Alumni associ-
ation.
Contributed Freely to Union
"No university in the United States
approaches ourI alumni record in con-
tributing to the Michigan Union," said
Mr. Shaw. Not only is this one of
the largest alumni gifts ever made to
e university but more alumni have con-
tributed' to It -than to any , previous
benefaction anywhere.
"The significant thing is, that (here
have been no very large gifts and that
a large portion of the money has been
raised through life memberships."
'A number of buildings on the campus
have been received by the University
through the generosity of certain of
the alumni. Among these is Alumni
Memorial hail, dedicated to the Uni-
versity men who fought in the Span-
ish-American and Civil wars. Another
is Hill auditorium, the gift of Mr.
Arthur Hill, '65L, while Lane hall, in
part, was also given by alumni.
Gave Numerous Dormitories
Alumni house, Martha Cook dormi-
tory and Helen Newberry residence
are all three individual alumni gifts.
Betsy Barbour house, the newest dor-
mitory for women, which will be fin-
ished by next fall, is the gift of ex-
Regent L. L. Barbour.
Besides these examples of large in-
dividual gifts there is a long list of
smaller -ones in the form of bequests,
scholarship funds and endowed pro-
fessorships and lectureships.
NEW BOOKS RECEIVED SHOW
CHANGED PUBLIC ATTITUDE

Only $16 for tuition.
This with other information about
the University of Basle, Switzerland,
is contained in a booklet which Dean
E ffinger is distributing to students in-
terested in foreign universities.
The University of Basle, established
in the fifteenth century, is by far the
oldest of the Swiss universities. Any-
one who loves to roam among ancient
libraries and who is impressed by
treading in the footsteps of the great,
is advised by the booklet to visit Basle.
The whole character of the town
and university is conducive to study.
The townspeople are hardworking, in-
telligent and lovable. They look ask-
ance at young men who idle away their
time, and are bent on wasting their
father's money.
The book also contains some fine
views of the city of Basle, as well as
some reprints of paintings. Dean Ef-
finger has but a limited number of
copies and those who desire al cata-
logue should see him at once.
CORNELL PLANS TO BUILD
WAR -MUSEUM AS MEMORIAL
Some agitation has been started at
Cornell to establish a war museum to
be made up off souvenirs given by Cur-
nellians who were in the service. Al-
though Cornell has no place in which
to store such relics at present, it is
hoped that in honor of the Cornell
men who fought for their country a
university union may be erected,
which would house the collection.

cleaned in Enprgine. You won't
to wait a few days before you can
them on account of the odor.

Try us on velours, velvets and plus
our cleaning and pressing has

equal.

Have
coats,

Energine Cleaning is
against this.

a prot

in fact all of

M" Books and Albums

window?.

There are some 'hew
ch better. Look them

"ge }Come of snerine'

-1
t Chocolate season is here. The
h quality of the chocolate that we
is responsible for the excellence of

Captain

Rickenbacker Visits Here

~St.

1. 4

Captain Eddie Rickenbacker and
Walter E. Flanders, both of Detroit,
were in Ann Arbor during the past
week, visiting George Flanders, '23.
Rickenbacket, who was credited with'
bringing down 26 German planes and
became America's ace of aces, is now
in businessin Detroit.1

4k

Phone 2508
209 SOUTH FOURTH A'

Diversity Ave.
St.

SERVICE-WORKMANSHIP-QUALITY
THAT'S DIETERLE SHOE REPAIRING
HENRY O. DIETERLE
48SOUTH MAIN STREET NEAR WILLIAM

i

ii Co!
w York

OVAN
e Shell

Books received at the General library"
lately have takep on a more reasoning
and theorizing attitude than during the
early part of the year. Instead of the
many books about ravaged Serbia,
Roumania, Belgium and other devas-
tafted European countries and the
great sacrifices made by the various
warring nations, there is more of a
questioning attitude apparent, coupled
with efforts to explain the various re-
cent great events in the world.
Some of the additions to the librarr
include theatrical books, biographies,
books concerning the position of wo-
men in the commonwealth and one
treatise on sociology. A great many
novels have also come in and the list
includes a number of books of a po-
litical and historical type as well as
on subjects ranging from the strendh
of will to folk lore in the Old Testa-
ment.
VAUGHAN TO. HEAP
T. B. STAMP SALE
Dr. V. C. Vaughan, president of the
National Tuberculosis association,
whose headquarters axe ii New York,
has been appointed by the Michigan
association as chairman of a state'
committee which will be in charge of
the state sale of seals curing the first'
ten days of December. The committee
will be composed of representative
citizens froml all sections of the state.
The task of selling 15 million seals
in 'Michigan is the biggest that has ever
been undertaken in the history of the
state anti-tuberculosis association.
Only 8.3 per cent of the funds raised
will be turned over to the national
organization, the remainder being used
in fighting tuberculosis in this state.
Dr. Vaughan, as president of the
national association, heads all anti-
tuberculosis activities in America this
year and his acceptance of 'the ap-
pointment as. head of the Michigan
committee places this state at the
center of the nation-wide campaign.
How much larger the task is this year
than ever before is shown by the fact
that it is planned to raise $6,500,000
as against $2,500,000 of former years.
TOQUES RECEIVEW CAP NIGHT
REACH CHILDREN IN FRANCE
The "frosh pots" which were tossed
into the box last Cap night have
reached their destination. Two hun-
dred of the toques are still on duty in
Ann Arbor, having been sent to the
University hospital for the children
there. The rest of the toques and caps
were sent to the children of the iron-
tier society in New York and from
there sent to France.

PHONE
ORDORS
PROMPTLY
FILLED

Are You Going Away over Thauksgiving?

-s ;
, ;
1

67

ESTABLISHED 1857

ooO

Then, of course, you will want a new dress. And what ca
more attractive than a velvet one.
Velvet is excellent in the winter time for dress occasions, it
warm, comfortable and very dressy. These frocks made up with
braiding are indeed effective and just what you want for the Th
giving holidays. We have some very good looking models:
A dull green velvet is simply but attractively made up in a str
line frock. Its pockets, collars and cuffs are trimmed with light
brushed angora. It is very smart and at the same time simply n
that is could be worn for any occasion.
Blue velvet is used in various ways to make smart frocks.
has a double ruffle peplum edged with braid. Another equally
looking velvet dress has a circular neck, panels and braiding.
Black velvet makes the richest dress of all, and when, it is
bined with silk braid it is indeed pretty. Also, it seems to be beco
to all women, being girlish looking. One very attractive velvet in b
has unique fringe trimming set around the edge of a Russian bl
The varied length of the blouse effect gives a different touch.
smartly finished at the neck with a touch of lace., .

p

$1.5

.41

I

7' k

Another black frock with a circular neck has
with silk braiding over a satin underskirt. It is
model that can be worn to all places.

a fulli
pretty

,{

(Second Floor)

~Just.

What You 'ye been Seeking

with aristocratic lines and
ritten in' the high-class
and a superior v.lue at

(Others at $18.00)

; -'

A dress evening shoe with low heels is indeed difficult to find. We, who have
grown accustomed to low heeled walking shoes, find that the dress shoe with the French
heels are almost "painful." When we have them lowered we find that the original shape
has been ruined-and we are in despair.
At last, here is a stunninig black satin opera pump with the desired long lines and
a BABY LOUIS HEEL. t is a beautiful graceful shoe, quite as graceful and dressy
as one with the French heel and at the same time will bring the comfort of low heels.
And the price of this slipper is but $9.00.

A[RK ROA US.P~IT.

BOOT
SHOP

(Ffrst Floor)

115 So. Main St.

4

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