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November 23, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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43 an

1ati

DAY

Or

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1919.

o

PRICE

Beaten

By

Gopher

,#

1

Science:
Conditions;

Discuss

A thetic

men

Conquer

In fall

Conte

TES

yesterday morning in
11 resulted in the selec-
following squad: C. V.
Jacob Goshkin, '22L,
;on, '20, Anna McGurk,
es, '21, W. P. Sandford,
Atts, '21, and M. Youngs-
eight names two teams
will be picked and the
o speakers will act as

SEVEN MEN ON INSIDE OF FOOTBALL
SITUATION BLAEPO PRTAND
LACK OF CO-OPERATION FOR FAILURE

BAitTELME EXPLAINS DIFFICULTIES
TION HAS MET IN
191A fTICNhIGAN1

WIlICR ATHLETIC ASSOCIA.
]DEVELOPING
EL'PVEN

T n

I I

Yost Is
's.

CTIVITYX

years,
record

1

[" club yes-
nion of the
be the mat-
cs, i1t is not

1U1-7 IAUI111Y 11. L'LL A TY * 1
YOST DECLARES SPIRIT OF SERVICE MUST
REPLACE PRESENT GRANDSTAND ALLEGIANCE
Yesterday afternoon marked the close of the most unsuccessful football
season Michigan has experienced since the advent of Fielding H. Yost as
mentor.
Various reasons have been advanced during the disastrous season for the
failure of the team to make a creditable showing. "What is the matter
with Yost? What is the matter with the Athletic association? Why don't
more men try out for the team? Why do we send our injured athletes to
a harness shop inAtead of to a specialist?" These are some of the ques-
tions that have been uppermost in the minds of Michigan men everywhere.
Many of the rumors that have been circulating this year are groundless.
In order to sift out those which are without basis, and t start a move-
ment which t111 prevent a recurrence of the 1919 situation The Daily has
asked seven men prominent in athelitc circles for their opinion on the
athletic conditions. In doing this an attempt was made to obtain the un-
biased opinion of these men. None of the men interviewed was told what
the others had said.
Coach Yost Asks for Alumni Support
Fielding H. Yost has coached Michigan's gridiron men for 20 years. He
has turned out teams and developed the brand of football that has won
lHim thg reputation among sport critics of being one of the ablest mentors
in the country. In commenting onthe results of this season he said it
would be difficult to ppint to anyone thing that has been responsible for,
the poor showing the team has made. -
"There has not been the proper dffort exered by the alumni lit geeting
football men to come here. There should be a, greater campaign among
them, not only for the sake of athletics but for the benefit of the Univer-
city. The alumni, with the assistance of the students, should create a spir-
it in their respective communities that will ;arouse a desire in high school
men to come here. Every.Michigan man shotld make it a personal matter
to see every prospective high school athlete in his home district and talk
him into coming to Michigan.
3lust Develope Spirit of Service
"Then the spirit here at the University must be renovated. We have got'
to have'the spirit of service. By. this I mean that the students must sub-
merge their personal interests in the mass upon which an institution
builds its reputation. We must Have the willingness upon the part of the
men who make up the football team to work, not for one year, but for three
years to get a place on the squad. A winning team is not composed of men
who are novices at the game. It is composed of men who have learned to
play' by long, hard experience.
"There must be more of a willingness to serve manifested-the .willin -
ness to- take punishment, not for the benefit of any one individual but for
the benefit of the University. We are
lacking in the spirit that sends 75 Goetz Supports Yost
men out for football every afternoon Angus Goetz, '21M, captain of the
all during the season, and 100 out for Varsity this year absolves Coach Yost
the cross country squad. Out 'of the from all blame for this year's showing.
6,000 men s.on the campus this fall "I think Coach Yost has done' wond-
only 37 men eligible for the Varsity ers with the material he has had. to
reported on Fery field and but 15 came with thisayear asIhddnto
out for cross country.with this year/ I don't know
"There havesbeen lots of little things anyone who-could have done better.
that have been wrong this year, sev- "He has beei serb usIy handicap-
erally they were insigniflcant, but ped .by having the men he depended
collectively .they were annoying, I do upon unavailable this fall. In addi-
not know who was to blame , it was lion to this, there has been a lack of
most likely due to a lack of co-opera- spirit on the part of a few members
tion. of the squad. , This in itself tends to
Epuipment Shortage Temporary drag down the morale of the entire
Epulimen Shotag Temorar .~team.
"There have been temporary shortt .
"Thereason for so many men being
ages of equipment, the quality of the Inellgible this year ress with the
jerseys was not as good as it has men themselves In the first place. In
been in the past, but thiS is not the the second place their fraternity is to

BLOCK "M AFUND
STILL LACKS $60
Subscriptions for the block "M"
flags up to Saturday night had totaled
only $240. -The extra $100 over the
amount secured at the mass meeting
Friday night was collected at the
game and at the movie Saturday
night. It is still necessary to collect
$60 in order to cover the expenses in-
curred by the committee in staging
the "M'. %
"I feel that the block "M" was a
great success and should be contin-
ued in the' future," was the opinion
of Carl Johnson, president of the
Student council, after yesterday's
game. He also stated that he felt
that great credit ought to be given
to Sphinx and Triangle and the other
men who assisted in the staging of
the "M".
PROF.VIIBERT WILL DIRECT CON-
TINENTAL DIVISION
IN iPARIS,
(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 22, 11:55% p. m.-
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins .of the Uni-
versity of Michigan was elected pres-
ident of the American University
Union in Europe at .a (neeting held in
New York Saturday. The Union was
reorganized with a representative
body of trustees,. of which President
Hutchins is chairman.
- Other officers elected were: Vice-
president, President ,J. G. Schurman
of Cornell; secretary, Prof; J. W.
Cunliffe of Columbia; treasurer, H. S.
Thompson of Princeton.
The new office of the continental di-
vision in Paris is to be ia charge of
Prof. Charl'es Vibbert of the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
A basis of co-operation with the
Americag. council of education and the
Institute of International Education
has been drawn up by representatives
of these organizations for -submissop
to the governing body
816 TEN Ct AMPIONSHIP
CAPTUREDY ILLINOIS
Columbus, 'Nov. 22.-With a half a
minute left to play and the Buckeyes
leading by one point, a goal from
placement pricked the bubble 'of Ohio
State's championship hopes and to-
night Illinois stands supreme in the
Western Conference football world
by v;rtue of a 9 to 6 victoily. Bobbie
Fletcher, Illnois quarterback, won for
himpself a lasting nihe'in the Orange
and Blue hall of fame by success-
fully negotiating, the try from place-
ment from the local 26 yard line.
Sixty Yard Run Wins
Chicago, Nov. 22.-A brilliant 60
yard dash by Allen Davey who en-
tered the game as a substitute quar-
terback in the last three minutes of
play gave Wisconsin a 10 to 3 vic-
tory over Chicago today.,
Break Tie for Victory
Cambridge, Nov.. 22.-Harvard de-:
feated Yale in the annual football
classic today 10 to 3 before 50,000
spectators. It marked the first time
in 20 years that a Yale team has gone

SdoWn to defeat in one season in its
two big games with Princeton and
Harvard.
Indians Wil Speak at Service
Henry Rloe, Cloud, Yale graduate
and a member of the Winnebago
tribe, and Gray Earth, a member of
the Sioux tribe, will speak in the Pers-
byterian church at 7: 30o'clockS un-

GOPHERS OUTCLI
MICHIGAN, 3 T
IN FINAL CONT
STRONG LINE AND FAST
FIELD TOO GOOD F(
YOST3IEN
SPARKS PUNTS AVEf
ALMOST SEVENTY Y4
Oss Scintillates for Victors, But
Lampi, and Arntson
All Shine

I'

t

How Thef Started
Michigan Minnes
Dunne....... L.E..... ...H
Goetz...... L.T. ... Hawk
Johnson..... L.G........B
Vick.. ...... Cy,.....Will
H. Wilson... R.G......Tie
Peach......R.T. ......Jol
Henderson.. R.E........C
Knode...... Q.B. .. Lampi
Weston...... L.H. ......
Sparks...... R.H. .....Arn
Cruse.:......F.B. .... .

11, of Lansing,
r, was chosen
; Tom Ham-,
ident represent-
Sully") Sulli-
nt representing
owe, '08, vice-
track; Elmer
ned secretary-
Ave committee,
hly, was named
. jattengill, '11,
ratkins,,'08, and
ing a memorial
, their lives in
with the re-
inanimously on
erection of an
nt on Ferry'
ets to be placed
etails' are to be

Outplayed and outclassed in every
department of the game, Michigan was
crushed by the mighty eleven from
Minnesota, 34 to 7. Against the com-
plicated double shift that the Wil-
liams coached warriors used on of-
fense the Yostmien were helpless,
Michigan showed signs of power in
only one part of the galne, at the
start of the second half, when they
forced Lampi to punt after holding
the Minnesota backs for downs.
Mimnesota opened by rushing the
ball from the 30 yard line, wlIfre it
had been downed after the kickoff to
mid field, where Lampi got loose
through tackle and , went over on a
40 yard run for the first counter."Oss
was the major ground gainer in the
rush that took the ball back from
the kickoff to the Michigan one yard
mark, from which point Ruben smash-
"ed the line for the second touchdown.
Michigan was'unable to hold the Min-
nesota backs, who went around end
or through the line at will, all the
plays being started from the shift for-
mation that the Gophers had worked
to perfection.
Michigan Loses Chance
Michigan's only chance to score in
the first half was spoiled when the
backs were 'unable to penetrate the
Maroon and Gold line after Hugh
Wilson had recovered the ball fol-
lowing Arntson's fumble of Sparks'
kickoff. The strength of the Minne-
sota line was evident when it held
on the last down after Weston and
Knode had carried the 'ball nine
yards.
Minnesota lost a third chance to
count in the first half when Ruben
fumbled on the Michigan goal line,
and Michigan recovered. Sparks
punted on first dolvn from 10 yards
behind his own goal, and the ball
rolled over the Minnesota goal line.
Froemke Makes First Down
At the start of the second half
Michigan held the G6pher plunges,
and Froemke made the only Michigan
first down, but the Wolverines were
forced to kick when , Sparks was
thrown for an 8 yard loss. Minneso-
ta resumed the machine-like play of
(Continued on Page Three)
Prof. Wood to Address Unitarians
Prof. A. E. Wood %of the sociology
department, will speak on "Labor and
Social Control," Sunday evening at
6:30 o'clock at the Unitarian guild
hall. Profesosr Wood has been ac-
tively associated with the Juvenile

who spoke was John
E, of- Chicago, mem-
d in Control of Ath-
nised the hearty c-
3 board in projects
he future be un4er-
4" club.
included the follow-
i players of former
ilds, '94, Harry Ham-
K. Pond, '79, a mem-
s first football team;
vgho..played cn 'the
h invaded the eg4t,
and Yale on sue-

fault of anyone connected with the
Athletic association, it is due to the
present conditiorfs. It is hard to get
athletic equipment of gny\ kind this
year. The supplies we ordered in the
early part of the sumimer did not ar-
rive until after pr.actice had start,
ed, and then the entire order was not
filled.
"I hope that we can eyelope a bet-
ter spirit before next year, one that is
substantial. Too many men thinlj that
when they attend a mass meeting or"
a ,lame and cheer for the team that
they are doing their duty towards the
University. Yelling does not win an
athletic contest although sincere sup-
port is an asset to any organizatiofi.
What we need now though is moret

blame, if they are members of a fra-
ternity. In the third place the Ath-
letic association has been negligent
in not securing the proper co-opera-
tion on the part of the faculty. I do
not feel that a man should be shown.
any partiality because he is a foot-
ball man, but arrangements should be
made whereby his standing could be
as'certained periodically. This would
tejO to prevent-him from getting hope-
leply behind in any ofhis Work.
Lack of1Equlpment Not Serious.
"While the equlpment has not/been
what it should have been, I do not
think the shortage has been serious
enough to materially affect the sit-
nation. We have got to consider the
difficulty experienced in getting these.
supplies this year.
"I think we should all start to work
right now for a better co-operation be-
(Continue n a eP as

material sup>
down on the

In
in 1

the form of menI

his 1

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