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November 16, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-16

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.1t

I

41

A6PP
:43 t
.,. a.

t~t PRES!
DAY AND NIG
SERVIC]

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1919. I

ORDER PLACED FOR
BLOCK." " FLAGS
A
Michigan's block "M" is assured, the
order for the material of which the
flags are to be made having been plac-
ed Saturday with the J. C. Goss com-
pany .of Detroit.
Although it was feared at first that
L FOR the official maize could not be recur-
ed and that canary yellow would have
to be used, this firm has found the
correct kind of material.
TLE When the original plans for the
PIDLY block "M" were-laid, the committee in
charge of the work thought that $200
ons Bewould cover the cost of the goods and
s Ad- .of making the flags, but it has now
been found that it will cost at least
rs $300.
At last J D -IS H
is treaty
;action fCA
igor that MPS THEATER FUND
ion fight
/n
NASH ANNOUNCES PROCEEDS
HAVE BEEN GIVEN TO
the first UNIVERSITY
Lopted inU
ervations
ins com- *Announcement has been made by'
ommittee David Nash, '20, treasurer of last
e parlia- year's J-Hop committee, that $162.03
on or a has been turned over to the treasurer
ly next of the University to b used as a nu-
leaders .cleus for a fund for a campus theater
cloture, to be constructed on the campus.
exceed- Since the announcement of the
r ado plans'last year for such a structure,
the officials of the University, who
vr, and haveinterestbd themselves in a cam-
an man- pus theater, have waged no campaign
ge and to raise the necessary money.
The money turned over by the J-
Hop committee is the first amount to
29'be given for the proposed new struc-
.rvatons ture. It is estimated that $250,000
will be eventually needed to build
,estions, a suitable campus theater for the
s. Shan- t. ,,

Several Untimely Accidents Threaten
Ultimate Success of Long
Airplane Flight
LIEUTENANT SAYS CONXERCIAL
JOURNEYS ARE IYPRACTICAL
The tale of the many difficulties en-
countered in making the first non-stop
trans-Atlantic flight, of how they were
overcome, and of the engineering feats
performed were told Saturday even-
ing in Hill auditorium in a very in-
teresting but simple manner by the
navigator of that flight, Lieut. Sir Ar-
thur Whitten Brown.
Accidents Occur
Several times an accident occurred
or a difficulty arose which each time
,threatened to make the historic jour-
ney impossible, the most serious one
perhaps being when the trip was
\more than half finished. '
Brown with his pilot, Capt. John
Alcock, D S. C., flew into ,an extra
large cloud, which cut off all 'view
of any visible object, and being
fatigued by the mental and physical
strain of making the trip, they lost
their sense of the horizontal. The
machine went into a downward spin,
and though aware that they were not
flying in the right manner, because
of the spinning of the compass, -the
men did not know where the earth
was.
Machine Drops 5,00 Feet
The machine went from a 5,000 feet
altitude to within '300 feet. of the
ocean before the sea was sighted, but
by a swift manouver, the machine was
righted when only about 50 feet from
the surface of the-water.

STUDEN T STRUCGK
Otis Graham, '2, Sustains Injuries
When Hurled to Sidewalk
by Car
PHYSICIAN SAYS CONDITION
FAVORABLE FOR RECOVERY
BULLETIN .
Danger of Otis Graham's dying
from his injuries had passed by
II o'clock Saturday night and he
had regained conaeousness. The
extent of his inuries had not yet
been determined.
Otis Graham, '23, suffered concus-
zion of the brain and probable inter-
nal injuries when a roadster struck
him Saturday afternoon while he was
crossing the intersection of Twelfth
street and North University avenue.
The left fender of the car, which,
according to Webb Clarke, '21,' a wit-
ness, was driving at a high rate of
speed and carried five women, struck
Graham in the ,middle of the back and
threw him to the sidewalk. -
Condition Favorable
According to Dr. H. M. Beebe, who
is attending Graham, the outlook at
the present time is favorable for re-
coery. The injured student was un-
'conscious for several hours and when
he regained consciousness was unable
to speak. Graham's home is in- Mus-
kogee, Okla.
Clarke stated that the car, after
striking Graham, continued at -the
same ,rate of speed'- for about a
block, when it stopped, and some of
the occupants came, back and watch-
ed the injured man darried into the
hospital.

The money turned over represents
the proceeds left over from the ex-
penses of the J-Hop last year.
FORMER DAILY MAN IS MADE
EDITOR OF FARMING WEEKLY
Verne-E. Burnett, '17, former news
editor of The Michigan Daily, has
been appointed managing editor of the
Michigan Farming Weekly, published
at Mt. Clemens.
Burnett received his appointment
soon after returning from France,
vwhere he was on the editorial staff
of ?he Stars and Stripes, A. E. F. pub-
lic tion, during a year of overseas
duty. He had previously been on the
staff of 'the American Boy at Detroit.
ALPHA SIWS START INTER.
FRATERNITY SERIES WITH VIM

Brown
first to
ards of4
mander
Alcoci
Newfoui
a few m
afternoo
Clifden,
minutes
The fi
paratus
(C

a gave the credit of being the Driver Unknown
attempt successfully the haz- The name of the driver could not be
a trans-Atlantic flight to Com- ascertained. Witnesses took the num-
Read and his crew. - ber of the car as Z-5990. Chief of
k and Brown started from Police Thomas O'Brien stated that he
idland by Greenwich time at had not yet received 'the name cor-
ainutes after 4 o'clock on the respopding to that number, his pe-
n of June 14 and landed at riodical list from Lansing going only
Ireland, just 16 hours and 12 to the numbers beginning with Y.
later. * As the driver :s liable to trial for
rit hoL r out the wireles; ap- crii:.Inal action .nd, in case of Gra-
went wrong, part of it being hain's death, for manslaughter, the
;ontinued on Page Six) ;police do artment is making every ef-
fort to apprehend the, responsible per-
uon. The state offices are closed at
A9NCE COMMITEE noonSaturday, and the. chief of po-.
lice does not believe that the name of
NKS MILK the driver will be known before Mon-.
day -_

J-LIT COMMITTEES
NAMED BY JACOB&
Junior lit committees as announc-
ed by Albert Jacobs, president, are:
Social committee, Ceilan Rorick,
chairman, Katrina Schermerhorn,
Henry Whiting, Dorothy Dunlap, Grat-
tan Rourke, Alice Beckham, Jack
Gardner, Frances Maire, Richard
Khuen ,and Eleanor Spencer.
Finance committee, Fitzhugh Brew-
er, chairman, Gladys Reineke, Wil-
liam Ingham, Bernice Nickels, Paul
Eaton, Donald Shelton, Dorothy Herr-
man, Donald Porter, Josephine Mc-
Guiniss, and Archibald Wenley; audit-
ing committee, Lee Woodruff, chair:
man, Ilizabeth Mengel, Joseph Avery,
Grace Ohlmacher, Valdemar Watts,
and Elinor Leonard; membership
cdmmittee, Helim Hulbert, chairman
Cecelia Fohey, Harcourt Johnstone-
Lois Mayer, John Stewart, Esther
Hollands, and Johj Henry.
1"MEMBERS TO EEC
CONVE~iON EL6ATES
KEATLNG WILL BE HELD IN LANE
HALL THIS AFTER-
NOON
Members of the University Y. M.
C. A. will"meet at 2:30 o'clock this
afternoon in Lane hall for the pur-
pose of electing delegates to the In-
ternational Y. M. C. 4 convention to
be held from Nov. ig to 23 in De-
troit.
According to the ruling of the con-
vention committee, the University is
entitled to 28 delegates, representa-
tion being based on membership. The
committee plans to take care of
about 5,000 delegates.%
Should Hand in 1ames
Members in the University wishing
to attend sho'uld hand their names
to any of the Y. M. C.~A. officers be-
fore the meeting today.
The speakers on the Detroit pro-
gram include some of the best known
men of the times. Secretary of Navy
Daniels, Bishop McConnell of Denver,
President King of Oberlin university,
Dr. Robert E. Speer, and Commodore
Mayo are some of the men who will
discuss problecs of, the V. M. C. A.
and the churches. All aspects of "Y'
work, including the indstrial, for-
eign, city, army and navy will be'pre-
tented.
Exhibits Prepared
The Detroit association has made
'appropriate plans for a' convention of
this kind, having prepared a series of
exhibits, which pictorially set" forth
the work of the "Y" at home and
abroad, both in peace and in war.
Leaders of known ability have been
secured to .lead\ the singing.
A part of the time of today's meet-
ing in Lane hall will be taken up with
a presentation and discussion of this
year's program for the University Y.
M. C. A.
TIME LiMIT EXTENDED FOR
TAKING 'ENSIAN PICTURES
Group photographs of organizations
avnd societies to be used in the 1920
Michiganensian must be taken not
later than Nov. 30. Owing to the re-
organization of many clubs, the time
limit has been extended 15 days in
order that they may arrange for sit-
tings.
Seniors, who intend having' por-

traits made from their Michiganen-
sian sittinrgs, are asked by the pho-,
tographers authorized to take pictures
for the yearbook to make appoint-
ments now. All seniors, wishing to
use their pictures for the Michiganen-
-sian only, are requested to postpone
their sittings until after the :liday
rush.
PLEDGES OF ALPHA NU GIVE
INITIAL TALKS TO SOCIETY

ILLINI ELEVEN GOE
LINI; FOR FOUR
DOWNS
VICK BRINGS MI
ONLY SCORE 0

Defeat Is
Met

Most Serious La
With in Years;
Score 29i to 7

(The Varsity wil
M. C. station this
o'clock. Students
meet the team.)

kf._.=. _... 1...,

* UU W U
STA[
By i

uu

I IEII

(By Associated Pre
' Urbana, Nov.15.- linois
cisive victory over Michig
day, 29 to 7, before 14,000 i
second largest crowd ever i
Illinois field
After holding the Illini ii
the first period the Wolver:
crumbled.
Four Counters
The first Illinois touchc
early in the second quarte
backfield crashed through
line repeatedly, Crangle h
ball through center to the
line. Waquist went ove
touchdown. 'A pass, Walqu
ney, carried the ball to ti
line 'and enabled Ralph F
boot a goal from the field I
and score.
In the third period the'
ed up with forward pass
which the Michigan defer
helpless, Illinois piling up
downs in the third perio
second string men replace
ulars in the final period,
tiated- a touchdown, Love
over shoftly before the g
Vick Scores
Michigan's only score c
final period when Vick p1
fumble and, ran 40 yrds I
down.
An injury, to Ralph Flett
ke's "ace," made it necessi
ry him from the field, at
ning of the fourth period
X-ray examination had 'be
was said Fletcher will be a
against Ohio State next
(Play by Play Story, oi
Purple Wins
Chicago, Nov. 15.-Not
spurt in the last few minu
won her only Conference
her last Big Ten game of
over Indiana S to 2 at Ei
day. The Hoosiers seemed
game cinched until the-I
when Northwestern ralli
marches down the field on
of which Daley made a'
'from the 25 yard line, turn
ent defeat into a one point
Breaks Tie for WI
Chicago, Nov. 15.-Perc;
quarterback for the Un
Chicago, pushed, shoved s
kicked his team to a 9 t
over ,Iowa today. It was
team's second defeat of th
season. Grahm with the
ing a close and with the
6 began a series of brilli
that brought the ball to the
and when the Hawkeyes he
kicked for the winning th
Madison, Nov. 1.-"Chic
all American 'halfback 'pl
next to his last game for
saved his team from poss
today when he booted a
from the 20 yard line, be
consin 3 to 0 in what wa
the most desperately foug
the Western Conference bek
race this season.

No act.on toward framing an amend-
ment to the milk ordinance to re-
quire pasteurization of all milk was
taken at the meeting of the ordinance
committee of the city council ,Friday,
night.
Dr. Wessinger, city health officer,
states that he had spoken to the com-
mittee chairman, who promised'to bring

Alpha Sigma Phi's took the measure
oA the Delta Upsilon fraternity eleven
NS Saturday afternoon, to the tune of' 6
FDA Y to 0, in the opening game of the, in-
terfraternity series. in a hotly con-
.eld fromtested fracas. The Delta Upsilon team
he booth fought gamely, but were unable to
b stop Quartel, the Alpha Sigma - Phi
halfback. QuarteY long end run in
Eote the fourth quarter netted the touch-
a Elm down which won for the Alpha Sig's.
Mason, Iland failed to make the goal.
Li, ' and-
ager, J. DR. WARTHIN WILL REPEAT
-Geor e LECTURE FOR MEN TUESDAY
d EPal Dr. Aldred S. Warthin will repeat
teEarle,s his lecture for men at 7:30- o'clock
sh., Tuesday evening in Hill auditorium.
OF Although in the past he has given
FONDAY this lecture as many as five or six
times each year, he is trying this
year to cut the number of talks tot
iday aft- a minimum, and be is giving this ad-
eshmen" dress only because of the misunder-

the matter up at the meeting.
bers present believed that Dr.
ginger should appear before the
ail if he wishes the regulation
Charles C. Freeman of the,
,nan eating house is a member
)rdinance committee.

Mem-
Wes-
coun-
made.
Free-
of the

ill tell
which
of the
captain

standing attending his lecture earlier
in 'the fall.
650,000 GERMAN UNEMPLOYED3
RECEIVE BENEFIT INSURANCE

Alderman Mayer, a member of the
*ommittee, stated yesterday that he
')elieved the pasteurization amenda
nent would be passed when it comes
before the council but that Dr. Wes-
singer should take the initiative.
Dr. Wesinger in a statement given'
on finding that no action had been
taken by the committee said-, "I will
appear before the council if neces-
sary to.have the amendment framed.
I thought I had done all that was nec-
essary in seeing the chairman of the
ordinance committee, but I will see
the city attorney about the procedure
required and. then take any action I
find necessary to put the bill
through."
Regarding the necessity of using
only cream that has been pasteuriz-
ed for the manufacture of ice cream,
Dr. Wessinger said, "The amendmen4
to the milk ordinance I wish to see
passed will take care of that, as no
unpasteurized cream may be sold to
the firms making ice cream. Of course
we cannot control the product which
is shipped into the city already
frozen."
Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the
Medical school stated that he was
wgrongly in favor of making. the or-
dinance read that milk, cream, or ice
cream cannot be' sold in the city with-
out the assurance that it has sbeen

SMHONY 1ORCHESTRA
BIVES CONCERT MONDY
Ossip Gabrilowitsch will direct his
Detroit Symphony orchestra in a tri-
unal program of Russian, Norwegian,
and Prussian orchestral numbers at
the Choral union. concert to be given
at 8 o'clock Monday evening in Hill
auditorium.
The first number scheduled is von
Weber's overture "Oberon," which was
finished April 9, 1826, at a time when
the composer wrote of himself, "The
end of all is fast approaching." It
is cast in the sonata- form from ma-
terial drawn from the opera.
Mrs. Rhead as Soloist
Mrs. George B. Rhead will play the
solist parts of the pianoforte con-
certo of Grieg's. This work was first
performed at Copenhagen in 1869 and
has remained a prime favorite with
pianists and the public ever since
that time. The three -movements dis-
play much variety and reveal themes
of great originality..
Tschaikowsky's "Symphony in E
Minor" will conclude the program.
The' themes are simple' and easy to
follow throughout . Great beauty is
gained by attention to the minuteness
of detail elaborately clothed in or-
chestral dress. -
Four Movements in Solo
There are four movements in which ,
oboe, horn, violin, and other strings
separately carry the solo themes. The
climactic statements in the fourth
portion point to the conviction on the
'part of the composer that "All's well
with the world."
Harvard Beats Yale in Roosevelt Drive
Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 15.- The
total of the Roosevelt drive at Har-
,vard ,University amounts to $1,478.
,Harvard has beaten Yale in this drive
by $250, .

class dues " Berlin, . Nov. 15. - Approximately
:ussion at x650,0'0 . persons throughout Germany
da money are now drawing the unemployed ben-
V. Rive, (fit insurance, says an official labor
ien to re- ibulletin. Since June, it is stated, the
ersity rul- ,number of workless has gradually de-
hool debts 'creased, the largest proportion of
can grad- 'them being in the big cities.
-. Chemicals Extinguish Small Fire
y Evening Chemicals of the fire department ex-
f the Cul- tinguished a small roof fire at the
day even- home of Mrs. J. V. Manderbach at 920
11,..w - L.o Go wr~

Pledge members of the Alpha Nu
Debating society were. given a chance
to demonstrate their ability at the
meeting of the society Friday evening
in its rooms in University hall.
The program for the evening con-
sisted of short speeches by 10 of these
pledges on serious and humorous top-
ics. The. results were satisfactory to
members of the society who were
pleased at the showing in these
speeches. The society is preparing for
a busy year's work with the accession
of this promising material.

(By- Asso
Urbana, Nov. 1
country team de
-P U io n f~

I

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