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November 15, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGH
SERVICI

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1919.

PRICE

,M1

.; - -ATLANTIC FLYE"
"° f TO TALK TONIGHT

Pasteurized Ililk Now Used By
Hospital; Ice Cream Called Danger

Lieut.

Sir Arthur Brown Will Tell of
Danger in Trans-Ocean
Flight

LIEUT. ARTHUR BROWN,

K. /E. B.

of the I. W.
onight from ,IL ON FL n aMIrNER
)f the north-
n progress AL
rge Wright
on forthe DECLARES POSITION OF BOTH AS
uty sheriffs IMPOSSIBLE; OPENS STRIKE
eadiness for PARLEY
a, command- (By Associated Press)
he national Washington, Nov. 14.-Demands of
d telegraph- coal miners for a thirty hour week and
oss recom- ,six percent Increase in wages and an
al companies unyielding position by the operators
ed. alike, were declared "impossible" by
ed Secretary Wilson in opening today the
a Legion told conference called to brinig, peace to
eaved what .the bituminious fields of the nations.
reports that To obtain this peace the secretary pro-
ere. All in- posed three plans of procedure.-
,are loaded Agrefement Stands
4ization and Declaring that the Washington wage
4 from lum- still is legally in force, Mr. Wilson told
. that I. W. the operators and miners that the peo-
Abs to go to ple of the United States yere not
"shylocks" and do not want to exact
was said, but "the technical provision of a bond
uld pare for when the conditions under Which the
if the coun- bond was ;made have changed." He
ei. would be added that "if, any great change i
made in the contracts the people of
the United States are the only ones'who
f the Ameri- will have to pay," and throughout his
nod with the remarks emphasized the public intd'-
illed at Cen- 'est in thq coal settlement.
tter received The three proposals expected to aid
headquarters the two factions in arranging the new
The letter wage agreement were set forth by
y an oficial the labor secretary as follows:
Proposals Suggested
1. Negotiation through joint wage
scale committees representing all dis-
DATA tricts. . Negotiations through con-
MPILED current sessions of o.mmittees from
the various districts, and, 3. Negotia-
tions first, of an agreement in the cen-
id names and tral competitive field and then of
the Alumni agreements for other fields with that
cbi catlon of ofthe central district as a basis.
ehigan's men After hearing Secretary Wilson the
e during the conference adjourned until 10 o'clock
,o m fnU it tAh minors and on-

NAVIGATOR A WINNER OF BRIDE '
AS WELL AS BIG MONEY PRIZE
The story of the first non-stop trans-
Atlantic flight will be told first-hand{
to Ann Arbor by Lieut. Sir Arthur
Whitten Brown, K. B. E., who with
Captain John Alcock, '. S. C., was the
first humen being to stand on both the,
western and eastern hemisphere in-
site of 24 hours, at 8 o'clock tonight.
-in Hill auditorium.
Flew 140 Miles Per Hour
The trip made last June was repletey
with thrills. At times the atmosphere
would be so dense that the tips of the
wings would be blotted from sight and
the end of the nose would be lost ina
the darkness into which the machine'
was rushing at the rate of 140 miles
per hour.
The trip across the. ocea was made
in 16 hours and 12 minutes, the ma-
chine leaving New Foundland coast
and landing at Clifden, Ireland.
An interesting fact connected with
the landing is that the point which
the machine alighted on was but 10
'miles out of the course originally
planned by the airmen and but 60
miles from the town of.Galway, where
the proposed landing was to be made.
The machine came to ground in a bog
close to the great Marconi wireless
station.
The machine used was a Vickers-
Viny-Rolls-Royce twin-engine air-
plane. It made the trip of 1,960 miles
without stopping,' the average speed,
being 120 miles per hour.
Won Prize of $5O,000
The trip won for the airmen the
prize of $50,000 offered by the London
Daily Mail for' the first non-stop un-
aided flight across the Atlantic. The
two men were also knighted for their
achievement. They are at present the
'yongest British knights, Alcock being
27 and Brown being 33.
Brown is an American, though he.
was born in Glasgow. His parents
moved there from Pittsburg, his father
being interested in the Westinghouse
Engineering company.
A note of interest is that Brown
,won his bride after flying across the
Atlantic, she preferring to wait to get
married until h.er lover had made the

"Pasteurized milk is now being
used in all departments of the regu-
lar University hospital,". said Dr. C.
G. Parnall, head of the hospital, in
an interview yesterday.
As a' result of the expiration of the
contract with a private milk dealer
to supply the University hospital with
all its milk, the Ann Arbor Dairy
has now been given the' order. The
contract was in force before Dr. Par-
nall came to his pressat position,,
about a year ago.
"U'p until very recently I was not
convinced that the raw milk supply
we were using was not just as good
as that supplied by any pasteuriza-
tion plant in the city but I believe
that now the milk supplied us from a
city dairy is all right. At the present
time their milk, according to the
standards set by the New York city
NOIIN MADE BY,
'20 LIS FRCOUNCIL1
CLASS TEAM MANAGERS NOMIN-
ATED; COMMITTEES
APPOINTED

milk commission, is much of it grade
A, but there is some grade B. A small
amount of that sold in the city would
be rated as grade C or fit only for
cooking," was the statement of Dr.
Parnall.
At a recent meeting, the medical
faculty passed a recommendation to
the Board of Regents that all stu-
,dent boarding houses and both Uni-
versity hospitals be required to serve
only pasteurized milk.
"This will be brought up at the
next meeting of the -egents for pass-
age," said Dean Vaughan of the Med-
Ical school, "and if they make it a
ruling, there will be no more discus-
'sion of the question. It was not with-
in the power of the faculty to order
the hospitals to employ the pastewr-
ized milk, .without action by the Re-
gents."
Regent Beal, on being asked his
,opinion regarding the matter of pass-
ing an order to compel the use of
pasteurized milk by all boardingr
houses, said that he could not sup-
,port the recommendation of the med-
ical faculty without more thought, but
that he did not believe in passing a
law to remedy every civic evil. He
said that he believed heartily in pas-
teurized milk, however, He thought
the public should be educated 'up to
requiring the milk without the neces-
sity of passing an ordinance.
In discussing th'e milk ordinance,
which is expected to come up be-
fore the city '-council next Monday,
Dr. Parnall said, "I am strongly in
favog ofipasteurized milk and cream.
By cream I mean that ice. cream as
(continued on Page Six) '
MEMBDERS OF ARSITY.
GLEE 'CLUBANNOUNCED
NINETY TRYOUTS QUALIFY FOR,
APPOINTMENTS ON 1919-20-
CLUB
The Varsity Glee club announced
yesterday the appointment of the
following men to the 1919-20 clubs.
A few more will -be added as soon as
their eligibility is determined. The
first rehearsal of the club will be held
at 7 o'clock Saturday evening at the
School of Musid.

Senior lits male the following nom-
inations at a meeting yesterday aft-
ernoon: student douncilmen, A. T.
Van Brunt, Harry M. Carey, Carl
Mason, Paul Shinkman, Mark Ehbert,
D. K. Messner, Elmer Cress, C. A.
Tefler; basketball manager, Morris
Piatt, J. P. Hart, and Robert Somer-
ville; baseball manager, Paul Kempf,
George Anderson, and Russel Barnes;
track manager, George Earle, G. W.
Froemke, and David Nash.
Appointments were made by' Wik'
liamR W. Hinshaw, president of the
senior lits as follows: special commit-
tees for 1920, William A. Iteitzinger,
chairman, Audrey Dornan, Ray Smith,
Paul Towsley, Sue Verlenden, Mar-
garet Spain, Marjory Van Norman;
membership committee, A., P. ' Van
Brunt, chairman, Bruce Millar, Rose
Sturmer, and Lucy Huffman; finance
committee, Charles R. Osius, chair-
man, Harry W. Heffner, and Dewey.
Fagenburg; auditing committee, Earl
Johnson, chairman, and Earl Cress;
invitation committee, David Nash,
chairman, Henry G. Hoch, Patrick S.
Nortney, Kathryn Glass, Florence'
Field, and Aimee Renkes; Michigan-
ensian delegate; Roy Chandler.

YOST 1WILL ,STAIl
VICK AT GEM.
AUTHORITIES EXPEO T 6RO1
1,000 ROOTERS AT
GAME
REICHLE IS ONLY NE
MAN ON ILLINI T
Zappke's Team Still in Race I
Ten Honors, Will Fight
Hard
(Special to The Daily)
Urbana, Ill., Nov, .14.-Ernie
Michigan's 1918 All-Western
will open the Illinois game
pivot position. This is the fir
this year that he has been pl
center, having filled the fullba
until last Monday. Czysz, wi
been in the( line all this yea
start at the place thus left va<
Vick. Culver, center in 1917, h
shifted from center to guard.
These two changes will gi
Wolverines a wholly changed
With the exception of Reichle
end in place of Smith, the
.team will be the same as the o
won from Minnesota. With
man back at half this is the
est combination that Zuppke
his command.
Yost Stages Practice
The Michigan eleven reach
bana at noon Friday from C
In the afternoon Coach Yost r
men through a light workout
Illini field, which had been
over to the Maize and Blue sq
that ;purpose. The coach 'ant
that all of the men on theteai
in good physical condition, ai
'Michigan will enter the game
row with the fewest number
ples than before any other g
'the year. Because of all of th
tice that has been held with
team in view, the coach
the team to play its best game
the Zuppke crew. Although
last chance for the Western I
legate football title disappear
the 13 to 0 94feat administered
cago last Saturday, the M
-team is still in a fighting mi
Illin44s Still in Race
That tomorrow's game wl]
savage fight from start to fin
foregone conclusion. Illinois
in the Conference championsh
having won four out of five 1
games, and should Ohio Sta
the leader, drop one of its re
two games, Zuppke's men ha
to go through the est of the
without a loss to take the.
The only eleven that has been
defeat Chicago this year, Ill
going at a terrific rate, and th
and Blue boys realize that tI
tomorrow will be, if anything,
er fight than the game with 4
Michigan will lineup at ti
with Dunne and Peach at- end
and Dunn at tackles, Culver a
si at guards, and Vick' at
Sparks, Weston, Cruse and Cz
be the Michigan backfield.
Perfect weather is predicted
(Continued on Page Si

1 be giv-
e entered
r closed,
men who
and the
ir places

seo

i of
that
be a
nber

n killed
t up to

in

the
its

as

OEss

tomiorrow to permi We ie ~u
erators to discuss separately the plan
which would be most acceptable to
each..
JUNIOR LITS ELECT
i CLASS COUNCILMEN
Charles Irvin and Henry hiting
were elected as representatives of the
-junior lit class on the Student coungil
-in the elections held yesterday.
Representatives on the J-hop , con-
:mittee are Richard Khuen 3rd, Rlobert
McKean, and Edward Kingsford.
MEDIC HONORARY
SOCIETY ELECTS
Fall elections to Alpha Omega Al-
pha, honorary scholastic medical fra-
ternity, were announced Thursday.
The five from the senior class who
were elected to membership are: R.
E. Boice, F. H. Busby, G. F. Moore,
J. Palma, and H. G. Waller.
,CHEYENNE COAL MINERS
RETU1 TO PITS; AGREE.
(By Associated Press)
Cheyenne, Nov. 14.-Seven thousand
coal miners in Wyoming hre to return'
to work at once following a satigfqe-
tory settlement of the controversy be-
tween union leaders and the operators
here late to4ay. The terms of settle-
ment provide the men are to return
to work on a wage scale adopted in
the central icompetitive field.

in raodjcjl Glass has
ollowing officers, Presi-
ierce; vice-president, N.
ecretary, M. Rottschaef-
'S. T. Moran.

trip.
T1h4 lecture is under the auspices of
the University Oratorical association,
this being the second lecture of this
year's series. f
Will Be Entertained
Sir Arthur and Lady Brown will ar-
rive at Ann Arbor at 9 o'clock this
morning, making the Allenel hotelr
their headquarters. In the evening
they will be the guests at a dinner
given by President and Mrs. Hutch-
ins, Regent -and Mrs. Beal, Professor
and Mrs. Trueblood, and several of
the Engineering department heads, in
the Union. At the lecture, Lieutenant
Brown will be introduced by Prof.
W. C. Hoad of the Engineering on)-
lege.
Prince Honors
Stdent Hero

In recognition of services render-
ed the Allied cause during the fighting
in northern Russia, the Prince of
Wales has presented C. E. Edwards, of
Highland Park, Michigan, with the
British military medal, awarded to
his son, Captain William J. Edwards,
ex-'19L, who died from influenza con-
tracted while in Russia.t
The ceremony took place Wednes-
day in Washington with Se.cretary
Baker, General Pershing, and Gen-
eral March present, while Mr.d.
wards took from the hands of the
prince the medal won by his son.
Captain Edwards died at his. home
last June, two weeks after returning
from Russia.
"Bill" Edwards left the University
in 1916 -to accept a scholarship of-
fered by the~ Ntional City bank of
New York. and was employed in Eng-
land by the . bank when the war
broke out. He won a commission in
the British army, and was commis-
sioned in the U. S. Marine corps after
the United States entered the war.

REDS USE MEXICO
AS STEPS TO U.

S.

BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 14.-Disclosure of3
large orders of arms and ammunition
placed by Mexico in Europe were fol-
lowed today by revelations pending
to show that the "Reds' underground+
line" from Soviet Russia to th Unit-
ed States ran by way of Mexio. '
It became known that the immigra-
tion service and the department of
Justice both are concerned at, the in-,
flux of Russian radicals and other
aliens of Red tendencies over the.
Mexican border. Furthermore gov-
ernment agents have traced much Red
propaganda as having come over the
Mexican border.
A letter written Oct. 23 by Ramon
P. DeNegri, Mexican consul genera
at New York, to Flavia Borquez, a
Mexican senator, endorsing the prin--
ciple of "natIonalization" has come in-
to the hands of the government and
already has been called to the atten-
tion of the state department byx at
least two senators as showing De-
Negri's . association with "radical so-
cialists" in the United States.,
DENTS AGITATE TO ORGANIZE
NEW SOCIETY IN COLLEGE
Agitation by the students of the
Dental college has resulted in the fac-
ulty of that school s'anctioning an ef-
fort by the student body to' begin a
Dental society.
The primary object is to familiarize
the men with the methods used by out-
side societies in advancing the dental
profession.
A committee of four juniors has been
appointed to draw up a constitution
for the new organization.

The men appointed are: :first ten-
ors, E. Upton, '20, F. E. Murdock, Sh.
of M., R. A. Mayer, '22L, LG Failing,
'21, H. G. Whitcomb, '21, L. Ful-
ler, '20E, C. C. McCormick, C. M.
Wimbles,, '22, E. S. Kingsford, '21,
H. P. Wagner, '21, P. R. Wilson, '21',
C. V. Wicker, '20, T. C. Anderson,
'20E, R. C. Angell, '21, C. E. Butler,
'21, C. F. Cowley, '22E, S. S. Hawkes,
A. E., Iskowitz, '22, K. H Petrie, '20,
E. M. 'Stevens, '20E, F. L. Warfel,
A. L. Winograd, '21; second tenors,
F. Goundry, A. C. Marwinke, '20E, D.
B. Darling, '22, H. C. Walser, D. O.
Avery, '21, F. L. Bates, '22, Harry
Bennett, '21L, Irv ng G. Clapham, '20,
Gage E. Clarke, -Paul W. Eaton, 21,
George W. Emery, '20, J. H. Foskett,
'21E, Armin Friedman, I. H. Fried-
man, H. O. Fullerton., '20A,. A. J.
Good, '22E, L. F. Mellander, Arthur
F. Nissly,- H. E. Ramsey, '21E, M. R.
Rattner, '21, Eldred Swanson, '21,
W. H. Turner, Carlton F. Wells, '20,
Robert F. Wieneke, '22; first basses,
C. O. Barton, '22E, D. DE. Nash, '20, P.
J. Beatty, -22, L. G. Crocker, '20, F.
S. Roser, '21E, M. W. Scofield, '20, H.
J. Schlee, M. Simpdon, '22M, Mil-
ton R. Atlas, '22, L. R. Dutton, '22E,
Mahlon H. Buell, C. F. Galloway, '22.
F. R. Malleaux, '22E, Richard B
Marshall, '21E, W. C. Martin, '22, F.
R. Storrer, '20E, Howard D. Tubbs,
'22E, T. I. Underwood, '21, Frank A.
Wills, 21E, William H. ' Wise, '21;
second basses, S. B. Daume, '20L, W.
C. Ellet, C. D. Hixon, W. L. Kemp,
'19, C. H. Mason, '20, W. M. Macken-
son, '22, C. P. Martzloff, '20, C. R.
Osius, '20, R. R. Smith, '21E, J. F
Walker,''20E, R. S. Buol, '20, W. B
Chenweth, '22, Eugene R. Elzinga, J
F. Esterheld, '22E, S. L. Hudd, '20E
C. J. Hutton, '21, Neal D. Ireland,
'20L, Lester R. 'Rodenberg, O. W.
Rush, '22, Harold G. Salter, '21E, A.
F. Schirmer, '22E, Blair K. Swartz
'22E, Eugene R. Vernow, 20E, and
James S. Wolfstein.
Members are requested to bring the
blue official Michigan song book wit:
them to the next meeting.

f
M8
f

FOLLOW THE 6AME!
Co-operating to* furnish
campus with a detailed pla
play report of the Illinois-\
igan football game to be p
ed today at Urbana, special
letins, following each move:
of the ball will be announce
the Union, from reports to 'b
ceived over a special D
Union wire.
In view of the cqld wea
and because of lack ofr(
The Daily discarded the ide
l; issuing play by play reports
its offices this afternoon.
stead, it was decided to co-o
ate with the Union. How
f bulletins will be posted' i
windows of The Daily offices
a complete story of the g
will be carried in Sunday n
ing's issue. Returns will
gin at 1:45 in the Union I
Reports will be relayed t
parts of the building.
1

. .

RN SUNDAY

morn-

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