100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I:

WI

[t .tlx

4
:43
attx

DAY AND NIGHT
. SERVICE

i

7-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1919.

PRIC&THREE ;.,

PRCETE

ENTS

ALLOWED

BLOCK

4 R

Leaves.
CLUB TO STAGE
BARRIE PLAYLETJ

Tonight

For

Illinois

TED

Comedy club will present a J. M.
Barrie play, "Alice Sit-by-the-Fire,"
at the Whitney theater on the night
of Jan. 28. It will be directed by J.
Raleigh Neljson who last year staged
the successful production of Barrie's
"Quality Street," and/with resources
for a brilliant cast and capable han-.
dling throughout, the production gives
all promise of success.
"Alice' Sit-by-the-Fire" is a new
play not widely staged in this coun-
try. Lovers of ,Barrie as a play.
wright, pronounce it one of his\great-
est successes.
In speaking of the choice, R. A. For-
sythe; '20, manager, says, "With a
play, author ami director of proven
-worth, I feel confident that Comedy
club will again assert itselfas the
,premier dramatic organizatioh of the
University." .
Joseph Avery, '21, president,.a -
nounces that the annual Comedy club
picture will. be taken Saturday after-
noon at 2:15 at the Rentschler studio
on Huron street.

W

cannot be
f the clAss
or commit

SERCI;
ON

PLEAS
OF PEOPLE,

MICHIGAN COME - BACK SPIRIT
NECESSARY, SAYS,
JOHNSONly
BAND WILL LEAD MARCE
OF STUDENTS TO TRAIN
Hurley Calls, Turnout Privilege;
Says Matter Is Vital
to All
LET'S GO MICHIGAN
The entire University will assem-
ble at 9:45 o'clock in front of Hill
auditorium tonight to give the team
a send-off for the Illinois game. The
following members of the Student
dent council have been appointed to
supervise arrangements: C. D. Bottum;
'20E, chairman, Karl H. Velde, '20,
David D. Nash, '20, Frank J. Helbig,
'20P, and LeGrand A. Gaines, '21E. At
10 o'clock .the team will be escorted
down to the train with the band in
the lead.
Support Imperative
"Eyery student of the University
should, be on hand to see the team.
off when it starts for Champaign,"
said Carl Johnson, '20, president of
the Student council, yesterday. He
continued, "Michigan is now given a,
chance #o prove that she has not lost
that 'come-back' spirit for which she
has been so justly famed in forner
years. With two defeats behind' her,
and two of the hardest games of tie
season before- her, it is imperative
that the student body give the team,
all the backing they possibly can. Not
many of us can go with the team, but
every one of us can be on hant to
give them such a send-off as Michi-
gan has never before witnessed. The
team deserves it, they are fighting;
it is the least we can do for them.
Victory Means Much
'It should also be remembered that
the cross country team goes to Illi-
nois - at the same time the football;
squad leaves. They also deserve the
student's hearty support."
George Hurley, '21L, secretary of the
Union, said, "The team faces the most

WHICH SIDE ARE YOU ON?-
A Michigan team will leave for, a rival field at 10:42 tonight.
That-team has been defeated twice this year. Michigan has always
been considered; the leader of the Conference and Champion of the
West. To lose the next two, or even one, games would for the first
time in history put Michigan at the bottom of the Conference list.
Never before has Michigan lost as she may lose this year. Never
before has Michigan been so near to losing the prestige that she.
has held from tiine immemorial. We'can stand the sting of losing two
games, but another must not be added to the list.
There is only one thing that will 'make that Michigan team
stand a. chance of defeating Illinois. That is pure, unadulterated
Michigan spirit. Michigan is going through on its spirit and nerve
as it never has before. There will be no schedule of trick plays;
Michigan spirit only can'push the 'Maizd and Blue team to 'victory. j
To have that spirit, the team must have the biggest/send off that has
ever been given a Michigan or any other team. Spirit, 'plenty of it,
displayed by the student body will give the team the confidence that
it must have to make, a good account of itself. It is disheartening
to anyone to lose two important contests. The team -is' no, exception.
It must be re-imbued with that old Michigan- -"fight 'em" spirit.
Cheer it, talk about it, stand behind it, do anything that will show
Those fighters that Michigan .is behind her team.
That train leaves the Michigan Central depot at 10:42 tonight.
Nine thousand eight hundred men and women, students and members
of the faculty be there. It's stay up or go down once for all-time,
Michigan.
Which side are you on?;

CO0'NFERENCE WITi
ATHLETIC HEAL
LETTER TO BE FORMED IN NO
STAND BETWEEN 25 AND
40 YARD LINES
. 1
FEW ASK FOR SEATS
IN CHEERING SECTI
Money Necessary for Flags Mus
Raised by Popular Sub.
scription
Michigan is to have a Block
this year, if the material for the
can be secured.
In* a conference yesterday with
director of the Athletic associk
and a committee consisting of
Johnson, '20, president of the
dent council, Carl T. Hogan,
president of the Union, and Harr
Carey, '20, managing editor of
Daily, permission was given to
students of the University to pu
the Block "M" this year at the
:nesota game.
Societies Len-Aid
Sphinx, junior literary honorar:
ciety, and Triangles, junior engiE
ing sdciety, will assist the con
tee in the work.
The Block "M" will be formed
year in the section of the north s
between the 25 and 50 yard I

Press)
12. -

Cities
Een-

COUNCIL PPOINTS
SCOMMITTEES FOR YEAR

COMMERCIAL FLYING

CILD.
TNI

ARRANGES. FOR MINNESOTA PEP ILEtTURER-. .MADE- FIRST, TRANS,

"In the future the public officials
re to be selected from the lists of
ue'Americans and unless you belong
that class you will stand a small
Nance in the political and social
'orld," said Sergt. Alvin C. York, of
ie Tennessee mountains in an ad-,
ress to the citizens of Ann Arbor
ist night at the First Methodist

MEETING AND FALL
GAMES

CONTINENTAL FLIGHT
IN HISTORY

Final arrangements for the send off

Trans-Atlantic flying on a commer-I

bes War. Experiences
with a short sketch of
nces overseas, Sergeant
bed the. battle in which he
the public eye in a vivid
ork, like many of the men
1 the fighting, does dot like
s army life and spent most
pleading for boys and girls,

)f thk

I mem- "The boys and girls of my section
eized a are Americans of the truest type and
re. At are entitled to the advantages of oth-
liter- er children," said York. "Give them
Aber-' achance. There are over two million
L were of them in the mountains of Viyginia,
Tennessee, Kentucky and North Car-
olina who never get a chance to go to
n Allen school over three months in the year
and they are pleading for a chance in
the schools. Many people of 35 and 40
N years are to be seen in the little
schools striving to write their names.
DAY Can we allow such a thing to exist
when we have such educational ad-
s med- vantages in other pa'rts of the coun-
initia- try? Every day I realize more and
he Nu more what a disadvantage it is to be
B given without an education and I am de-
[. Peet. termined to do all I can to prevent
enberg. other boys and girls from undergoing
reland, such embarrassments as I experience
Dr. G. day by day," he continued.
James Wears Many Medals
k Mar- He wears the uniform of Te Ten-
d Har- nessee troops, having been ommis-
sioned a colonel by his home state.
luwen- Sergeant York wears the French croix
James de guerre, the American Congression-
s, '21, al Medal of Honor'-the highest hon-
L. Sny- or to be given for valor by the Amer-
Eugene ican nation--and several other med-
1 Wil- als.

of the Varsity tonight were made last
night at a meeting of the Student
council in the Union..
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, Fred Petty, '21,
and Robe'rt F. Grindley, '21E, were ap-
pointed as a commttee to arrange for
the block "M" at the Minnesota game,
at the meeting of the Student council
last night in the Union. The tempor-
ary committees on class meetings,
mass meetings, class games, and mem-
orial have been made permanent.
Committeemen Appointed
The constitutional committee is
composed of E. J. Blackert, '20L, and'
Joseph Kervin, '20M. The advisory
committee is made up of Carl E. John-
son, '20; William W. Hinshaw, '20;
David D. Nash, '20; Samuel J. Slavens,
'20L; Legrand A. Gaines, '21E, and P.
McLouth, '21E,
It has been decide that a picture
of each' football man 'will be flashed
on the screen at the pep meeting the
night before the Minnesota game.
?rof. John C. Parker. has promised tc
be one of the speakers and the others
will be announced in a few days.
Samuel J.' Slavens, '21L, who is in
vharge of this meeting, promises that
it ll call forth the old time Mich-
sgan spirite
.Officials Named

critical game of the year, playing
against a powerful and a winning op-
,onent. If it loses the University fac-
es the most disastrous football sea-
son of its history. If it wins much
that has already been suffered will be
wiped out and we can face Minnesota
with confidence.
"This is a matter that is vital to all'
the University, and it is therefore
+the duty of every member ofI the
University to do his or her part. Few
(Continued on Page Six)
Committee* Has
Glee Club 'Names
Names of approximately 100 try-
outs for the Glee club have been
handed in to the eligibility commt-
lee, who, it is expected, will have
,passed upon them all by the end of
the week. Under ttis condition the

Cial scale with lieavier-than-air DIying
craft is not as yet possible, Lieut. Sir
Arthur Whitten Brown, K. B. V., who
lectures here at 8 o'clock" Saturday
night in Hill auditorium under the
auspices of the oratorical association,
is quoted as saying.
The principal reasn given by lieu-
tenant Brown for th impracticability
of airplanes of heavier-than-air type
is that the great weight of their fuel
loads makes it impossible to carry
-man'y passengers or a large amount of
freight. He hopes fdr the eventual
development of. some new 'motive
power which will obviate this diffi-
culty.
Lieutenant Brown together with
Capt. John Alcock, D. S. C., the pilot,
made the first no-stop transatlantic
flight in history last June, dying from
the Newfoundland coast to Clifden,
Ireland, in a few minutes more than
16 hours. This trip won for the avia-
tors the $50,000 prize offered by the
London Daily Mail for the first non-
stop, unaided flight acro'ss the At-
lantic. At the same time they were
knighted by King George> both hon-
ors being conferred by the R . Hon.
Winston Churchill.
THIRTEEN TAKEN
,BY TAU BETA P1
Thirteen men of the senior class of
the Engineering college have been
elected to the Tau Beta Pi society, the
national honorary society of the Eng-
ineering college. The men are: D. S.
Abell, .G. F. Anderson, C. E. Bottum,
B. 0. Burlingame, .L, 0 .Case, C. If.
Chidester, E. E. Dresse, W S. Kil-
patrick, F. 14. Livermore, C. R. Ny-
man, T. P. Russell, F. G. Schwalbe,
and L. L. Smith.
The men who were elected .repre-
sent the top fourth in scholarship of
the senior class. The initiation date
has not been decided upon but will
be in the immediate future.
Alpha Nu, Holds' Pledges' Night
Alpha Nu debating society will hold
a regular meeting at 7:30 o'clocl Fri-
day -evening in the society's rooms in
University hall. The meeting will be
mainly for the benefit of pledges and
three minute talks will be assigned
them. Visitors are invited.

morning otf the game so that each s
de . i - this, seetion, willb"w~
take up his flag whep he comes
the game. Instructions as to
forming of the "M" will be announi
later in The Daily.
Securing Flags a Task
The committee is having some try
ble in securing the material for
.flags of which about 2,500, 1,700 1
and $00 yellow, will be needed to
out the huge "M". Negotiations
now -being made by the commi
with a Detroit firm to furnish th
The money for the flags will be r
ed by popular subscription among
students and faculty. It is thou
that about $200 will be needed.
According to figures from the"
letic association, only -"1,444 stude
of the University, including 259
perclassmen, 49 of whom were seni
signified, at the time of sending
their applications, their desire not
'sit in the south stand. According
the Athletic association it will take
least 2,330 students to form the Bl
"M". This remaining number
been made up from students who a
(Continued on Page Six)
BILLIARD CHA MPIOr
AT UNION TONIGHI
David McAndless, amateur billi
champion of the United States, v
cross cues with Al Taylor, the Uu
professional, in an 18.2 balkline'ma
tonight at 8 o'clock in the'Un
billiard room. The match will be
400 points.
Mr. McAndless is coming here
the interest of the game only. He
receiving no remuneration whate
except for expenses, but is giv
up his time to 'make the trip in
der that the University students m
have a glimpse of the way billia
should be played. Al Taylor, his :
;al,, has been making some remai
able scores at the Union of late a
he should furnish the champion w
excellent opposition.
There is now a tournament
progress at the Union, two games
which have been run off. - Each m
plays Taylor in a 400 point mal
the one who makes the highest sc
against him winning tile tourname
In the first contest, Harbert was o
able to make five points before
oponent ran out and in the seco
one Potter had garnered 50 bef
Taylor reached the four centu
mark. In the first mapch Tayl
averaged 50 with high runs of
and 75.

Vanzwa
i, '21,
Marinu.
Frank 1
21,
eman, '2
r, '21, X
rris, ',
a Germa

daurice,
21, A.
an, '21,

PHILADELPHIA EX-SOLDIER

The officials in charge of the fall
games are as follows:' W. W. Hin-
shaw, '20; A. J. Cohn, '22L; Paul Free-
man, '22L; Jack Perrin, '20; Edward
Usher, '21;' Jack Dunn, '20; Arthur
Cross, *20; T. A. McAllister, '21L; M.
Towar, '20; J. Van Brunt, '20; W.
Leitzinger, '20; King Mesner, '20;
Daviv Forbes, '22L; G. Harvard, '20E;
R. A. Haig, '20E; Waldo McKee, '20E;
Knight Mirrilies, '20E; A. O. Cuth-
'20E; Harry Sparks, '20E; A. 0. Cuth-
bert, '21E; H. Whiting, '21; G. Rourke,
'21; J. L. Penticost, '21; R. Grindley,
'21E; Larry Butler, '21; John Henry,.
'21; L. C. Paisley, '21E; and Fred
Storrer, '21E.
It has been decided that the cane
spree and shuttle race will each count
two points and the bag rush three.
Knight Mirrilies, '20E, is to he in
charge of the pep 'meetings on the Sat-
urday morning preceding the games.
The class captains will be elected next
week at meetings to be called by the
class officers.

CHOSEN HEAD OF LEGION I first rehearsal will be held FridayI

, NOTICE!
I will meet at

Minneapolis, Nov. 12.-Franklin D.
Olier of Philadelphia, was tonight
elected first national commander of
the American legion at its first nation
convention. Other business was aban-
doned when it was announced that be-
cause of storm conditions delegates
who did not leave tonight would be,
.4 1 - - - -

evening.
Practically 200 students attended
the tryouts held last week, and much
good material was discovered. Men
to the number of 50 who sang in last
year's organization have been ac-
cepted and in addition the names of
iany who have had experience in
tther college glee clubs or singing
societies have been submitted.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan