100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Univer-

1.

cond

events ,and careers. But the man who pauses to
analyze the course of his conduct and has experi-
enced its inevitable results, knows that much of the
great Tomorrow is determined by Today, and that
the subtle knowledge of how to make a choice is at
the heart of success. And it is one big satisfaction
to realize that college does strengthen those men-.
tal faculties which go to make up decision. Painful
as may be the process of retrospection, there is sig-
nificance in the .fact that the upper-classman often
marvels at his own indiscretion in the earlier col-
lege years, and wishes-secretly-that he could do
many, many things over again. But this is evidence
of growth.
Proper sense of proportion and the value of de-
tail are as necessary to the art of choice as to the
art of painting or literature. The successful man
of the world has learned the proportional impor-'
tance of everything around him and also his own
relation to those things ; he has learned the impor-
tanceof details without making mountains out of
mole hills. He has learned to do the right thing at'
the right time and in the rifght way.
Problems of greater moment await the university
man after he has stepped from the protection of col-.
lege walls than .any he faced while there. Thus the
necessity for choice seems to go on forever. Its im-
portance cannot be over-emphasized; it is a test of
efficiency.

1.;

.

Jr.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 191,)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6: ro a.
m.. and hourly to 9:io p. m:.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. - - (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:os a. m., 9:oS a.
"m. and every two hours to 9:05*p.*m.,i o:5
V. tn. To' Ypsilaunti only, 11:: p. mn., x :zo
a. n. and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 -a. m. and
12:20 a.M. .
Excellent CHOP SUEY from
11:80 a. m. to midnight
ANN ARBOR CHOP SUEY
Steaks and Chops 814 8. State

Gymnasium Suits
Shirt-Pants-Shoes and Supporter all for
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

I

Efficency JEditor

8,

n

HOW TO TREAT A'CHAPERON
The chaperon is the person who has thrust her-
self upon a University party. No one has'asked
her to be present at the social gathering, of course.
She comes for the sheer .enjoyment. of sitting up
until midnight in a. cold dance hall. She loves-to
feel the December 'breezes wafted about her shoul-
ders. The jiggle of the spring floor, instead of "get-
ting on her nerves," rather has .the effect of a
lullaby.
Moreover, tle chaperon is a, highly exclusive per-
son and is offended when a student arouses her from
her pleasant reverie b a smile or a hand shake. The
chaperon never cares to eat, of course, and any, stu-
dent seen asking her out to some .chocolate filling
station during the intermission of the dance should
be promptly ostracized by his fellows on grounds
of inhumanity. Above all thing's" don't bore her
with conversation, 'she will be sure to resent it. "The
best way to avoid this 'if one is forced to sit near
her between dances is to leave one oitwo seats be-
tween.
Then last and most important; the manager of the
party should carefully avoid her, during the entire
evening, thus setting a good example to others pres-
ent.--University Daily Kansan.
The Guillotine

SERGT. ALTIN'ORK, GREATEST
WAR HERO, IILL SPEAK HERE
Sergt. Alvin York of Tennessee, who
holds the distinction of being the
greatest' individual hero of the , late
war, is to speak in Ann Arbor under
the auspices of the Rotary club on
the 'evening of Nov. 12, at the First
Methodist church.
Sergeant York, who prior to his, en-
try into thl .army, was known as a
conscientuous objector, startled the
country by "his exploits overseass.:
Since his return home he has been be-
sieged. by stage and' film- ofers, but
has refused them all and is devoting
his efforts to. raising funds 'for a little
mountain 'school in his district of
Tennessee.
Pay your subscription to the Daily.

Members Florists Telegraph Delivery
P hon e110 f102 S. Un
JUST ARRIVED-Our Second Big Shipment of
BOSTONIAN AND PACKARD
GENUINE CORDOVANS
With Cordovan Tops $14,
(These are beauties)

[ES FOR MICHIGAN
tantly 'being said about the preva-
:hitecture that exists on the cam-
uniformity of s4uares and 'angles
e f ecept in the liftle e of arch-
as Mty11emorial hall. Michigan's
>d and constantly becoming better,"
fes to be found on the campus are
other. But while considering the
n side it is not impossible to lis-
ients of beauty who do not desire
opy the architecture of factory
1many staight brick walls" is' a
ral of the old buildings: will have'
nd the 'State'street frontage of the
:ome radically changed, Though
ick of ground and the need of con-~
e agree with our artistic friends in
ew lower and more massive build-
the vogue instead of a continua-
lines and flat roofs. A striking
then woulk seem to enhance the'
what e already have. The Me-
has never looked out of place
ve to' look into the 'far distant fu-
we are going to have." West hall
ecessitate replacement ; the advo-
pus theater are still active. When
comes it might be well to consider
-extravagant, perhaps, but none the
-in the' form of arcades and domes.
~TLIGHT TRYOUTS
n issued for tryouts for the Spt-
the Un~ion's annual variety show.
wimming pool in the Union build-
led, depends largely upon the finan-
he Spotlight and this financial suc-
turn, upon the nature of the po-
lent body of some 9,ooo who are,
t, far more mature than have been
a many years, there must be a
of all kinds. It is a known fact
great number of erstwhile profes-
professional entertainers on the
lId be notable additions to the most
ram.
there is no reason why the 1919
not have the most and best talent
ian has ever been the case before.
require no urging to'report to the'
old Union Tuesday night. Every
guaranteed a chance to- proye his
iteur or professional, and whether
or not, the very act of trying out
dence of an interest in a worthy
CHOICE
idecision are far from rare in the
:y man's lrife. Intent upon many
ed by the thousand influenees fur-
demic, or by friends, or by organ-
s the multitudinous paths that oth-
I are open to him as well. A con-
made of 'him that he do one thing
times there even seems to be no
tance. A sort of little crisis arises

f

Other Cordovans'
with Calf Top at....

$13.00

CAM PUSBOOTERY

304 SOUTH STATE STREET

::. _ . .

Verse Libre
(By Edna Lou Walton)
The Sower
I hold pollen of dawn
In my hand,
With it I, sow the night;
Over the mountain
Spring the first pale blades
Of the new day.

busy

. -0 1

Bee

'I

The Lights
The sun is -a luminous shield
Borne up the blue path
By a'god;
The moon is the torch
Of an old'man
Who, stumbles over the stars.

/

.:1

313 SO. STATE

Poetic or Dog License?
Dear 'Louis
Yesterday in Polk-Fc 'I made up the following
out of my own head and offer it to show what
poetic licenise can do.
Frankie Furter loved Miss Weiner,
His head it was a-whirl;.
He took her in his arms because
He never sausage a girl.
Jean- Paul Marat.

Going Up

k

Meet at BUSY BEE for an AEROPLANE RIDE
Taxis will call for you here between 3 and 4 Saturday afternoon and
Sunday, and take you out' to the AVIATION FIELD, ABSOLUTELY

I

The wurst we've ever heard as.it were.

FREE.

Blankety-Blank Ferse
"By my oath,"
Cried Charon
As he toiled
And perspired
And grunted
And wheezed.
"This old boat
Can't be moved
At all because
This blamed old river
Styx."
We thank yob.

This is the ONLY place where taxis will call for you and get you to the
field FREE OF CHARGE.

/

Come early and enjoy the sensation.

I

A box of Page1 and Shaw Chocolates

Our Daily Novelette
He-"Don't you like these 'roll your
arettes?"
She-'No, I simply can't en-Durham."
(They haven't spokei 'since)

own' cig-

will make your ride worth while

Famous Closing Lines
"I'll make a clean breast of it," said the chef as
he scraped off the duck's wish bone.
'Louis XV.

II

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan