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November 07, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1919.

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5,

itiallssue Of Michigan Chies
Brings Various Opinions To Light'

(Brewster P. Campbell)

If the first issue of the Mic1igan
Chimes .may be taken as a criterion
of what is to follow, the publication
bids fair to live up to its avowed
purpose, that of expressing campus
opinion, and to all appearances, opin-,
ions which have lain dormant 'for1
some time have awakened to wage
war against certain conditions exist-
ing on the campus.
Ralph 'Gault, '21L, has written an
article which may well startle into
activity, or spell the death of, those
numerous societies which yearly pick
'certain of the campus notables' as
worthy of theiramembership. As a
member of a majority of these same
societies, Gault is qualified to discuss
his subject.
+ It seems that this is what mab

I 1I 11

where it belongs, merely on the fact
that when a ,good year comes the 'stu-
dent body, the alumni, and all in any
way connected with athletics, forget
the lean years and remain inactive,
allowing things to take their own
way.
In a clever farce the mysteried of
sorority rushing are at last bared to
the public. Wtittezi it four "spasnsi,"
the satire proves amhusing, yet tee
feels that there is-an undercurrent of
thankfulness that the task of" rush-
ing is over for another year.
Serious discussion is given the Fall
games. The plea is for a return to
those "good old games" which once
instilled the spirit of real classy riv-
alry into the under-classes. The ideas
expressed are worthy of consider-
tion.
Other art4cles deal with the present
football, season. the relative values of

PLANS COMPLETED
FOR AERIAL EXTRA
Weather permitting, the campus
will be' deluged with a shower of
Michigan Daily football extras Sat-
urday. Arrangements with aviators
who will be in the city on that day
have been completed and the act
awaits only the time.
Mr. West, local representative of the
Michigan Aero club, who is handling
the bookings for rides in the Curtiss
aeroplane that will be used by The
Daily, reported last night that due
to a flood of applicants the machine
will be kept in the city over Snuday
for the accommodation of those who
want' rides. Wst can be reached at
Fs1. Free taxi service from the Busy
Bee'will be maintained, to the aviation
gield.
The extra to be issugd by The Dailf
will carry a play by play report of
the Michigan-Chicago game schedul-
ed at Chicago, Saturday. Itl will be
placed on the street, immediately aft-,
er the game. A special wire to The
Daily will carry the reports.
SPOTLIGHT FUNDS
TO 6 FORPOOL

,

hopeful
dianapo--

w

STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO PRI
ALL-MICHIGAII OPERTIC

a W -+^I

ay to It ctZ ULLL1 r Ia iy u
trike, termed' a "lean year" in Michigan'
s put athletics. No 'doubt this is the fact
p which called forth an article, entitled
ained "The Knees of- the Gods" dealing
ublic with conditions existing in Michigan
o re- football from year to year. Admitting
n of that there is some gross'error in/the
manner in 4hich the athletic situa-
tion is handled, it pins this terrorl

"d

State street and Washten!w avenue
as dwelling places, the Student coun-
cil and subjects of such general in-.
terest. The art work is commenda-
ble and the humor column has not
been neglected.

Ton Was Wildo
Year Ago Today
One year ago this afternoon, "the
fighting S. A. T. C." was roused from
a dismal contemplation of ballistics
and war issues by the frantic peal-
ing of bells and the shrill screeching
of many whistles.
For reportsrhad just come in from
the United Press that the armistice
had been signed and the war was
over., Then Ann Arbor went wild.
All classes were let out and a terri-
ble hubbub arose. State street be-
tween Liberty and William streets was
packed with a frenzied throng whose
individual members seemed to vie
with each other in acting as insanely
as possible.
The Daily hurried out ah extra
which only served to increase the
town's excitement. A huge parade
formed, led by the Varsity band play-
ing "The Victors" and composed of S.
A. T. C. companies and townspeople.
Jt stretched' out for nearly eight
blocks:.
Dr. Lovell was, in the height of his
glory. Leading. aband of some 50
freshmen, with coats inside out and
trousers rolled up, down State street,
he halted to address the assembled
multitude at the corner of- North Uni-
versity street. Because the whole
crowd could not see him, the renown-
ed poet was: placed upon the Class
of '63 rock on the corner of the cam-
pus. On this historic spot, Dr. Lovell
celebrated the glad occasion by giv-
ing a rather raucous rendition of that
classic ode of his- own composition,
'Good-by, Sweetheart."
So vigorously did Ann Arbor give
in to the reaction of many months
of war, strain, that when, the armis-
tice really was signed, the edge of
its enthusiasm had been blunted.
COUNCIL SUPPORTS
GLASS ATHLETICS

E. MORTIMER L
CHOSEN AS

. ,

SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND
All) DRAMATIC SOCII
MANAGEMENT

Union

o TICKETS '110 FOR
I1 GAME, MORE "COMINSG
DIAL LEAVING AT 10:80 TO.
(BHT WILL CARRY ROOTERS
/ TO WINDY CITY

11- I

Washington tonight
.Assistant Attorney
harge of the 'govern-
ared there was no
cy toward the strike
I endeavor to obtain
temporary injunc-

of the depart-
xn miners and

'One thousand and ninety tickets for
the Chicago game have been ,sold to
students by the Athletic association,
and 400, which are on the way and
expected to arrive this morning, will
probably be disposed of by even-
ing.
To accommodate this 'hute crowd
which is going, for Saturday's game,
the Michigan Central has put on a
special, which will leave at .10:30
o'clock this evening, arriving in Chi-
caso at 7 o'cl6ck Saturday morning.
Both sleepers And coaches are be-
ing carried on the special. The 1:16
train will have no parlor cars. Res-
ervations for the return trip are be-
ing made at the local station, and
ample. accommodations are promised,
inasmuch as extra 'coaches will be
placed on all trains out of Chicago.
Railroad officials estimated that '600
students would leave today, which of
course does not include men who
left earlier inl the week, some de-
parting % as early as Tuesday night.
Friday night's special will carry at
,least 200 with possibilities for many
more, while a large number of stu-
dents are leaving in the morning and
afternoon.
Michigan Central officials ,stated
that any number of students could
be taken care of, and that they were
looking for an unus'uafty large sale
of tickets today.
UNION WILL GET
RETURNS BY WIRE
Returns from the Chicago game will
be announced at the Union, beginning
promptly at 2 o'clocj. Saturday. Play
by play the story of the contest will be
received over a special -wire, which
has been arranged for by Union of-
ficials.
A board, ruled like a gridiron, will
be raised in a prominent position, and
a ball, blue when Michigan is on the
offensive and red when Chicago has
it, will be used to note the different
changes in the progress of the game.
I Before 2 o'clock preliminary matter
on the teams' practice probably will
be received. There will be room
enough for at least 400 students.

BONCI AND BROCK SITE,
PLEASING SONS PROSRAM
ITALIAN TENOR AGAIN PROVES
ELF A FAVORITE HERE;
\ SOPRANO APPEALS
(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Ann Arbor's Extra concert series
opened last night in Hill auditorium
with a' high class program of songs
in the great trio of languages--Eng-
.lish, French, and Italign-by Alessan-
dro Bonci, a well-known favorite
here, and Miss Eleanor'Brock,'' a
young American concert debutante.
Miss Brock proved that her title of
"The. Southern Lark" is a fitting trib-
'te. Her voice is a sweet, lyrical
soprano with tones that are as true
and -clear ds a bell. -Her abilities in
the upper register were well dis
played in Bishop's "Lo! Hear the Glen-
tl Lark," where lher tones were beau-
tifully pure. She was at her best, per-
haps, in "Themes and Variations" by
Prock, where her voice soared in al-
(Continued on Page Six)'
Cheers To Speed'
T eam To Chicago
he entire body of students of the
University, with tje exception of
those-,who have to contend with "8
o'clocks,"'is exjkpted to accompany the
Varsity football squad to the Michi-
gan Central station this morning, to
assure them that the University is
back of them to a man. The team'
leaves this morning for :Chicago for
the annual "I&rvard-Yale battle of
the west."
The band, which is scheduled to
leave on the same train, will lead
the Varsity to the station, playing
r"The Victors," "Varsity," ,and other
Michigan fighting songs.
"Beat Chicago"' signs which have
appeared upon the campsu have rous-
ed the students to the 4mportance of
the battle with Chicago and they are
prepared to give the teams the prop-
;er backing. Hundreds have already
left the 'city for Chicago, to see the
game, while another trainload will
leave tonight.
Following 'a pro-rata assessment
among the fraternities on the cam-
,pus, a sufficient amount of money
was raised to send the Freshman
squad with the Varsity. ,The year-
lings will leave on the same train
as -the Varsity and will be given an
'opportunity to see the game from the
sidelines.'

Vaudeville Proceeds Will
Used To Help Build
Plunge

SLVERAL ACTS NOW LISTED;
WILL "HOLD TRYOUTS TUESDAY
To establish a nucleus around which
will be waged the campaign for funds
for the Union swimming pool to start
the ball roling for the realization of
what-practically every University man
Is waiting, the Spotlight vaudeville
this 'year is being strenuously spon-
sored by all Union officials.
To Hold 'Tryouts
Edwin S. Larsen, '20, chairman of
the Spotlight, says that he has already'
signed up some good acts but is de-
sirou; that all the talent on the cam-
pus come prepared with their skits.
at the try-out- at T o'clock next Tues-
day night at the old Union. A com-1
mittee assisted by Earl V. Moore, ,mus-
ical director of the Union, will pink the
best numbers.
Comedy Acts Wanted
"We are trying," said Larsen, "to
have a show this, year composed of
.acts that are all different, and in or-
der to do -this it will be necessary that
a large number come to the try-out.
If possible, there will be fewer mus-
ical acts than customary in a campus
entertainment but those skits -with
music will be the 'beet we can get.
Comedy stuff is what is wanted and I
know for a certainty that there is
plenty of it around the campus if the.
,men will only turn out." '
Committeesiare being appointed to
assist in filling Hill auditorium on
Dec. 5, the night of the Spotlight.
SHARFMAN WILL REPRESENT.
U. OF M. AT NATIONAL MEET
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman will repre-
sent the University of Michigan. at
the national meeting of the Asso'cia-
tion of Collegiate Schools of Busi-
ness to be held at Harvard university,
Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 13, 14, and 15.
At this meeting the relation of the
business department' to the other
branches of the various universities.
will be discussed.' The representa-
tives to the convention are' for the-
most part deans and heads of busi-
ness departments.
WETS LEAD IN OHIO, LATE,
REPORTS INDICATE VICTORY,
Columbus, Nov. 6.-Practicallycom-
plete returns of Tuesday's election
from 59 of the 88 countieĀ§ ta'bulated
-at the office of the secretary of state
tonight show the wets to be leading,
on all four prohibition proposals by
majorities ranging front 728 to 50,-
000.

32 over last sat-
he miners union
and asserted'
owed no crumbl-
anywhere in the

Be

Play Will Be Presented in De
At Wb'tney; Principals T
Tryout Today
With both students and facult3
cast, Reginald DeKoven's :
opera, "The Red Feather," w
played at the Whitney theatei
time in December, under the a
of the University Dramatic s
Tryouts for principal parts will
at 3 o'clock this afternoon
School of Music.
In view of the demand in ti
few years for an actual Michiga
ical production, the commi
student affairs has granted per
for the new venture, -in whi
University School of Music i
Michigan Union will co-operate
full extent of their musical and
atic resources.
Dramatic Socety in _Cha
The production committee
Dramatic society, of which Pro
bert A. Kenyon is chairman, wi
the general direction of the ope
,E. Mortimer Shuter, whb stageg
On, Dad," the 1919 Michigan
opera, 'and who will stage ti
Union opera, will be personal
tor of the entire production.
Earl V. Moore, musical dire
manr operas, will have charge
music.
The opera selected is one of
en's best works. The book w
ten by'Carles Klein, while the
is allcif a very high order. T
duction is rather of the opera o
type than that of grand opera.
"The new show will notin a
eonfiict with the production
regular Union opera," said Pi
Kenyon. "For several years th
been considerable feeling that'
iversity was big enough and h
ficient talent to produce so
that should rpresent all the it
of tfie school both+ from the
atic and musical standpoint.
Want Faeglty and Stude
"Under the direction of the
atic society's production con
and with the assistance of the
of Music and the Union the ne'
will be made an All- ichlgar
Any eligible student in fhe Un
'or the School of Music may
for a part, as may any membe:
two faculties.
"This is simply one more goo
and one more chance for'thos
ested in drama and music to ta
in a high class production."
Director Shuter, after a, fin
ference Thursday night, an
that the production' would be b
tirely for, this opera, ,nd that c
would be securedfrom Van H14
company, Philadelphia.
"The University is assured o
class production in every r
said Mr. Shuter.' "Book and
have stood every test and hba
pronounced of the highest ord
JUNIOR ENGINEERS TO HO]
MEETING AT 9 O'CLOCK
Junior engineers will hold
sembly at 9 o'clock~"Friday i
in room 348 Engineering build
juniors will be excused from
for this meeting. Colonel L'
the military department will
tre work being done in that
The chairman of the J-hop
tee will be nomihated as well
standing committees of the clan
tions will occur at an early

rumors, apparently em-
high sources, that the
aring set for Saturday
r for one week without
ither side. Equally per-
reports that Samuel
sident'of the American
f Labor would make a
eal to Attorney General
rrow for withdrawal of
ag order and all court
in assurance that if this
e strike would be settled
put back to work in 48,

Discubsion of matters of' class im'
portance to arise during the present
year occupied most of the time of the
meeting of class officers, called Friday
morning by the Student council. This
was the first of a 'series of meetings
to be held throughout the year.
Many matters were discussed, the
most important of which was thatof
intramural athletics. Carl Johnson,
'20, president of the Student council
and presiding officer, informed the -of-
ficers that they should do everything1
possible to encourage class athlet-
ics. Athletic directors should be chos-
en at once, he stated.
Presidents were inforced that they
were members of the Chimes board,'
and presidents of senior classes were
instructed to appoint representatives
to the .Michiganensian staff immedi-
ately.
-,The policy of holding many class
functions, such as smokers, was fav-
ored, and Johnson urged that the
classes get back upon the old basis
of having several a year. Carl 'Ho-
gan, '20E, president of the Union,
asked the classes to have their af-
fairs at the Union, stating that it was
a duty of the Uniin to look after such
matters. Junior engineer officers
were instructed to start work on the
J-Hop, this being the year for the en-
gineers to elect the chairman.
Means of collecting class dues were
also talked over.
Prof. Drake Not to Meet Classes
Prof. J. H. Drake, pf the law depart-
ment, will not be able' to meet his
classes in Property I and Partnership
today and Saturday. No assignments'
will be given for the hours missed.

of the city but
e Ames that'the
compromise the
illegal was ac-
)rd in the sub-
the strike sit-
ted to the cab-

,

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