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October 26, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-26

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ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1919.

PRICE 'THREE

4

1 "

WOLVERINE'S RIVAL
LOSES T O IOWANS
(By Associated Press)
Minneapolis, Oct' 25. - Superior
speed, deadlier tackling and a break
of luck which paved the way for a
drop kick from the 30.tyard line gave
the University of Iowa a 9 to 6 vic-
tory over Minnesota today.
This is the secondtvictory over the
Gophers for Iowa in two years. Phil-
lips was Minnesota's ground gainer.
Slater, Iowa tackle, played a powerful
game on1defense.
Other Scores
Wisconsin, 14; Illinois, 10.
Chicago, 41; Northwestern, 0.
U. of D., 16; Georgetown, 13.
M. A. C., 27; DePauw, 0.

WILSON DEMANDS
MEN TO RESCIND
COAL STRIKE CALL

DECLARES

IT UNJUSTIFIABLEI

AND UNLAWFUL IN STATE-
MENT

to

a into the prOMONSON DENIES
at Feirry
tvily over- DTIRIU UA1I
.RIofsIIUlt

at Fer-
.T. A.
execu-
nd was.
presi-
ing the
bp fla-

the evenipg. J
ant secretary of
s auditor. Quart-
numerous coins,
these. Pennies
ilar, the total
ng $51.52. Many
ns were found in
the rest of the
es to thank the
ling and grounds
ng the flags and
rdware company
also thanks the
ingly braved the
n L. Rourke, '21,
>rge Duffield, '21,
L, aided in carry-'

POWER TEACHERS' BODY HOLDSi
NOT WIELDED AGAINST,
NATIONS'. LEAGUE
"It has never been the intention of1
the president of the Michigan State1
Teachers' association or of any mem-
ber of the executive committee of the
association. to lave at ,the Detroit
meeting of that association, Oct. 30
and 31, either speakers who favor or'
oppose-the league of nations to the
exclusion of a discusion of the other
side," said Prof. James B. Edmonson,
of the education department and m
ber of the executive committee of the
Michigan State Teachers' association.
Papers Make Charges
This statement was made in answer
to the charge of several newspapers of
the state that someone had been at-
tempting to influence the teachers of
the state against the league of nations,
and that influence according to some
papers was cue to the executive com-
mittee of the Teachers', association,
who had placed three Republican lead-
ers in the persons of Senator Bever-
idge of Indiana, Congressman Kelley
of Michigan, and Congressman H. D.-
Fess of Indiana, on the program of
the Detroit Meeting.
League Advocates Sought
In making out the program, how-
ever, Professor Edmonson states, that
an attempt was made to secure See-a
retary Daniels of the navy, ex-Presi-
dent Taft, or Herbert Hoover, United
States food administrator, and there is,
still hope that one of these men may
be secured. If, however, no one of
national -reputation can be secured,
Professor Edmbnson is confident the
league of nations topic'will be avoided
throughout the meeting.
William Wheeler
To Be HeardSoon

LAW TO BE ENFORCED;
WILL PROTECT NATION
Entire Cabinet Backs Country's Ex-
ecutive; Says Order for Tie-up
Not Sancti&hred by All Miners I
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 25.-Holding the
impending strike to be not only un-
justifiable but also unlawful, Presi-
dent Wilson in a statement tonight
with the support of the entire cab-
inet called on the coal miners of the
nation, both union officers and mem-
bers, to rescind the strike order ef-
fective Nov. 1.
The president declined to enter in
to the merits of the controversy of-
the miners and operators, but declar-
ed that the strike which he character-
ized as the most far reaching pro-
posal in the nation's history to re-
strict production and distribution of
all necessities of life, had apparently
been ordered without ajvote of the in-
dividual miners concerned.
Serves Ultimatum
For this reason, the president serv-
ed definite notice "That the law will
be enforced and the means will be
found to protect the Interests of the
nation in any emergency that may
arise out of this unhappy business."
The president's statement was is-
sued tonight after his cabinet had gone
over the entire situation with Secre-
tary Wilon of the labor department,
whose efforts to bring miners and op-
erators together in negotiations had
failed.
The president in his statement re-
viewed the steps leading up to the,
strike call including the Cleveland
convention of the United Mine Work-
ers of America one month ago at
which the demands for a 30 hour week
and a 60 per cent increase in wages
were formulated.
Mentions World War
The war in itself the president as,
serted was a fact, peace negotiations
still In suspense and troops still be-
ing transported. Because /of these
factors and the added consideration
that victims of the strike w'ould be
among the rich and poor of the nation
the president said the proposed walk-
out should onlybe considered as un-
lawfulb and as the nation's executive
entrusted with the enforcement of the
law he would use the means at his
disposal to prevent any stoppage of
work.
*There was no. direct Intimatioglt 0

PHARMICS, DENTS
ELECT OFFICERS
Class officers were . elected by the
junior and senior pharmacy classes
Friday afternoon. The officers for the
senior class 'are : President, F . 3
Hebig vice- president, J. A. Wyman;
secretary, D. J. Hillier; and treasurer,
N. D. Miller.
The officers elected for the junior
class are: President, C. P. Lemp;
vice-president, C. G. Fuss; secretary,
Neda Taylor; and treasurer, Et C.
watts.
Officers for the classes of the Dental
college were elected during the week.
The junior class will held a re-elec-
tin Monday because of the tie vote
for president. Officers elected for the
senior class are: President, H. B.
Hinchman; vice-president, J. D. Glov-
er; treasurer, H. S. Horn; secretary,
'0. C. Williams. :
The officers for the sophomore
class are president,: G. J. May-
lor; vice-president, W. M. Brown;
treasurer, Dorothy Hard; secretary,
W. J. Peterson. Officers elected for
the freshman class are: President, E.
Y. Mast; vice-president, C. K. Madden;
treasurer, R. B. Collins; secretary, W.
B. Cuchman.
STRIKE MAY FOLLOW BILL
PASSAGE OF I1lIPENDING LEGIS-
LATION MAY PROVE DAN-
GEROUS, HE SAYS

SPECIAL NOTICE AS TO
CHANGE OF TIME
Monday, Oct. 27, and thereaft-
er until further notice, all Uni-
versity exercises will begin one
hour later than now scheduled.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President.r
Woman J ror In
. 4
Ann rbor 1Jbu
Ann Arbor has on the prescnt. jury
term the first woman juror in its his-
tory. Her na e is Mrs. W. B. Hatch
and she is om Ypsilanti.
Declsjons Reached Quicker
This startling fact is of great in-
terest to all, because it may have un-
foreseen effects upon our present
jury system, may even revolutionize
it. A great change has been evi-
denced already in all the decisions of
the juries of which Mrs. Hatch has
been a member. The decision has been.
reached quicker, the men have become,
enormously more polite, and loafing
has practically disappeared.
Will They Have Last Wordls
The ppssibilities of women 'in this
line have opened up great fields of
conjecture. For instance, will the
ladies always have the last word in
the decisions as they -so often have
in domestic life? Will they sympa-
thize with the poor robber and insist
that he be given his freedom and that
he will never do it again? Will they,
at the last minute as the jury is
marching into the court room, have to
put on some powder or put their hair
on a little straighter? These are but a
few of the queries
Developments to Be Watched
As there are 18 more this term who
may be used everyone will have a good
chance tq observe the practicabilities
of woman juries. One might even con-
sider letting the women take the place
of the busy men and fill the juries, as
opinion has it that they usually are
not so much occupied as the opposite
sex.
MICHIGAN SUGA R
TO HELP SCARCITY

Buckeyes First Counter
Made by Right
Splers

SPARKS'
SPOT

night that,
Ferry field,
decided to
banks will
atributions
h to give.
and soror-

HARLEY AND STINCHCOMB FEATURlE
OHS ~fME~ PRKS AND GOETZ WOLVERINE STI

RYE SUFFERS BROKEN
THIGH ON FIRST PL

KICKING IS
OF GAME
VARSITY

on Fluke
Tackle

ptions total up to
se organizations that
ied in their contribu-
ted to take them to
,cting chairnan of the
handled the drive in
r. Petty can be found
treet. The committee
iiversity has done ex-
considering the short
tion.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 25.-Organized la-
bor intends to present the right of
strike, officials of the American Fed-
eration of Labor said today, in warn-
ing that passage in congress of anti-
strike legislation proposed~ in the
pending railroad bill would result in
an 'immediate general walkout over
the country. (
A confeience was held today' be-
tween representatives of the Ameri-
can Federation of Labor, the rail-
roads brotherhoods, and four farm-
ers' organizations, which discussed the
pending legislation. Its was decided,
Samuel Gonpers announced, to call
the conference of heads of the .112
labor organizations affiliated with the
American Federation of Labor for
Saturday, Dec. 13, at Washington.
William H. Johnston, president of
the International Association of Me-
.chanics, declared that "direct action"
might be resorted to if all other means
of advancing the interests of the union
men failed. Other union official,
agreed with this view.
Washington, Oct. 26.-President Wil-
son cabinet decided today to call a
new conference in an effort to estab-
'lih industrial peace,. It will consist
of 1 of the iost prominent Anieri-
cang without division into groups and
the cabinet will recommend nomina-
tions to the president,
INTELLIGENCE TESTS ENDED
FOR FRESHMAN EN(INEERS

In spite of Sparks and Westo:
because of Harley and Stinch
'Michigan was forced to make its
bow to an Ohio State eleven,
day, bye a verdict of 13 to 3.
Before a capacity crowd on
field, the two teams performe
carefully groomed championship
tenders in a decisive clash. All
egy available from two veteran c
es was thrown open at the dispo
)pposing stars reckoned amon
irst in the country. Four perih
':he gridiron's best game subor
Ad Michigan to the lgher bid o
Scarlet and Grey. 1
Fate Hits Michigan
Fate dealt the Wolverine squ
opening fatal blow in the inju
,Rye on the kick-off. The ca
Michigan right and
Michigan right end suffered a b
1 g in the mix-up following S
couib's fumble and left a team o
field seriously. weakened by hi
sence. Strength in the Buckey
forced Spariks to depend on pass
longer gains. After the early
ture of Michigan's fast right
man, Dunne at the opposite ex
received the full responsibility &
rials and found himself unable t
with the number of Ohio back
understood the situation and
.prepared to offset his- efforts.
Through a failure to score f
ing the fumbled kick-off, Wol
'morale received a telling shock
from this instance until Ohio'
touchdown gave evidence of a
eye team filled with resulting
.dence which proved deadly.
Gains Limited to Start
Ground gaining of the afternoo
limited to Weston and Spark
Yost's lineup and the Harley-S
comb combination of Dr. Wil
actual yardage the Buckeye due
a better record than tue Mi
pair. None of those noted ope
workers were able to break aw;
the customary. number of long
but each contributed extra te
oi the several runs recorded.
Kicking honors were earne
Sparks without possible dispute
part of his Buckeye rival. In
goaling Michigan's quarter
from the 45 'yard line after th
favorite had failed -from the 2
chalk mark. In punting he out
Harley by an easy 10 yard avera
placed his, outside Moots with
cision which was outshone o
his previous phenomenal dro
tween goal posts.

NOW ON
EARGEST

PRESS
IN HISTORY
ory- for this
t is going to
his year than
from 400 to

f *sheets will be posted in
hall or elsewhere. All
uch as new addresses, new
numbers, etc., turned in to
,ory office up to last night
egistered; those coming in
be if possible, Fraterni-
other associations wishing
lists of officers, telephone
and addresses will be able
by having someone call at
;ory office at a date to be
in The Daily, -when the
s ready.
mendous enrollment this
greatly increased the task
ation. The extent of this
fat gauged by the fact that
ory will be nearly half again

Mr. William Wheeler, tenor, 'will
make his official debut in Ann Arbor,1
in a joint recital with, two other1
heads of departments of the Univer-
sity School of Music, Mr. Samuel
Lockwood, violinist, rnd Mr. Albert
Lockwood, pianist, at 2: pcloek
Sunday afternoon in Hill auditoriuhm
in a concert which is complimentAry-to
the genei -l publio.
Sings Tnknown Folk Songs
A unique inature of Mr. Wheeler's
concert activities is his jinterest in
16th and 17th century composevs. He
frequently introduces unknown folk1
songs into his programs, the accom-
paninments being played ,on the harp-
sichiord in the style of. the particular
period of the song by his artistic part-
ner, Mr. Arthur, Whiting."
Former Football Player,
For the past six years Mr. Wheeler
has held the two most important
church positions in New York city,
that of St. Bartholemews and Temple
Emmanuel. He is a graduate of Be-
loit, '00, where he was leader of the
college glee club and fullback pn the
football team.
Accompaniments for Mr. LQc4Tgwo
will be played by Mrs. Qkkelberg, a
graduate and former member of the
School of Music faculty. Miss p p~
thy Wines will officiate in the same
capacity for Mr. Wheeler.
Menorah Society to RearProf. Wenley
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the phll-
osophy department, will be the first
speaker to appear before the Michigan
chapter of the Intercollegiate Men-
oiih association, Sunday evening, in
Lane hall.

what steps the cabinet ha4 discussed
to prevent stoppage- of wort should
the president's message to thr nill
ers to rescind the strike order fail.
Baker'Oiferg Help'
It was regarded as significant that
attention was drawn in White House
circles to the statement made by See=
retary Baker in a recent address in
Indianapolis, when Mr. Dajer an-
nounced that department commander
had been directed to furnish troops at
the request of governors without re-
ferring th matter to Washington.
The services of the government as a
mediator were again extended to the
miners and operators. the president
declaring that he held himself in read-
iness at the request of either or both
sides to appoint a comijxssion to in-
'vestigate the matter.
DUTCH POLICE TO LOSE JOBS
AS KAISER'S BUTLERS, SOOXN'

That the present sugar shortage is
not a serious one is the opinion of the
local grocerymen. While it is true at
present that the supply of cane sugar
is somewhat limited this condition
should not last long for this year's
supply of beet sugar is soon to be dis-'
tributed to the consumer.
The following letter has been re-
ceived by several local dealers and is
self explanAtory: "The U. S. Govern-
ment has instructed all Eastern re-
finers to discontinue shipping cane
sugar west of Buffalo. In addition
to this since'the middle of last week
the longshoremen along the entire
Atlantic border have been out on
strike, consequently we will have no
more cane sugar to. ship this sea-
son."

T IN BELGIUM
$jXCE ARMISTICE
25.-The number of
out of wgrk, which,
a arinisticq was 800,-
ice4 to 200,000 while
,ched one-fourth the
Jaspar, Minister of
has told the Cham-
He also said that
ited to sendg.n army
rs to restore the de-
but that he had re-

Amer'opgep, ot. .,t is reported'
that the former. German 13pmperor has
sq far recovered from frner. fears of
molestation that, when he moves into
his new honse at Poorn, the Dutch
state police, who have been constant-
by on gtard about the Bentinck cas-
tle here ,since his arrival, will be re-
'lieved of' duty.
UNION BARBER-SHOP BUSY
SINCE OPENING FRIDAY A. M.
The Union barber shop, which open-
ed Friday morning, has been doing a
rushing business. Practically every
ininute of the time some one has been
waiting for a barber.

Friday finished the "intelligence
tests" that have been held for the
freshman class of the Engineering col-
lege.
The purpose of the examinations Is
to carry out a nation-wide co-opera-
tive investigation into suitable meth-
ods of admission to engineering col-
leges. This investigation is a study
of methods rather than a grading of
men.
Six examinations were held - on
Thursday and Friday of this week
te qne lsting 30 -minutes.
The conduct of the tests was In the
hands of the Mentor ommittae of the
engineering college, composed of
Prof. H. 1. Higbie, A. E. White, A. H.
Lovell, and W. C. Hoad. The results
will be rated /immediately and the
rates will be available shortly.
MADAME SAMAROFF CONCERT
TO BE IN H. S. AUDITORIUM
The concert of Madame Olga Sama-
roff which was announced to be held
in the Union -Monday night at 8
o'clock will be held in the High
School auditorium instead. .The Daily
made a mistake in announcing the
place. -

Very few, if any, of the local deal-'
ers have any sugar on hand at pres-
ent, but when the producers agree on,
a price for their product the shortage
s.hoild soon be relieved. Some of the
mIerchants declare that the shortage
is due, in part, to the housekeepers.
They declare that many of their cus-
toners come in for sugar when they
have a supply on hand and uncon-
-sciously are partially responsible for
the shortage.
GERMAN ARMY 'OFFICERS MAY
IAVE TO WORK FOR LIVING
Coblenz, Oct. 25.-Reduction of the
German army made necessary by the
conditions of peace has caused great
unrest among the regular officers with
regard to their future. 'German army
papers report that this feeling of un-
easiness among the officers is only nat-
ural as on August 1, 1919, in spite
of numerous retirements, there were
still 20,000 Prussian and Wurttem-
,burg regular officers in the.army. This,
number must be reduced to 8,000.

First Quarter
Dunne kicked off to Stinchcomb who
fumbled the.ball on Ohio State's 25-
yard line. Weston' recovered. -Mich-
igan's ball on O. S. U. 20-yard line.
Rye broke his right thigh. Czysz re-
placed Peach, and Peach went to end.
Sparks gained 1 yard on end run.
Sparks fumbles, but recovers for a 2-
yard loss. Forward pass, Vick> to
Dunne, fails. Ohio State's ball on their,
own 20-yard line. Harley punts to
Sparks who returns to Michigan's 31-
yard line. Weston makes 5 yards off
left tackle. Vick is stopped on line
plunge. Sparks goes through right
tackle for a first down. Ball on Mich-
igan's 48-yard line.
Michigan goes through left guard
for 1 yard. Weston makes 12 yards
on the left tackle, ball on Ohio State's.
-45-yard line. Ohio' State halts Mich-
igan on forward pass from center
Sparks makes 4 yards to right tackle.
Vick gains. 2 through center. Sparks
punts off side, Ohio State's b oar n
their 15-yard line. Bliss ga-s yards
off left end. Harley punts to Sparks
who returns to Michigan's 4 -yard line.
Vick makes 4 yard- off left tackle,
Willaman stc-s Weston. Michigan
penalized 1 yards for holding, Sec-
1and dow?. 20 yards .to go. Sparks
(Continued ?n Page Threej

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