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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1919.

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DELEG ATES

QUIT

PA RL

IN NATION'S DRIVE
r MEMORIAL; STUDENT

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$800 FROM
'Y
', '20E; IS
-LEADER
s Nov22; Ask

r funds
1 be lo-
is will
it parts
ne will

CAMPUS FOUNTAIN
AWAITS ITS BASE'
Due to the fact that the stone base
has not yet been received, consider-
able delay has resulted in placing the
bronze memorial drinking fountain,
dedicated to former Mayor Hamilton
of Ann Arbor.
The necessary masonry work was
done this summer and a new piece of
side walk put in on the campus at the
corner of State street and North Uni-
versity to accommodate the memorial.
As soon as the piece of stone for the
base is received, the fountain will be
set up.
CL OET TUTO TEACHWAR COURSE
WIDE TAKE CHWRGE OF COAST
ARTILLERY WORi; MEN
NOW ENROLLED

enaw county
;he Student
Wednesday
e campaign
to the delay
ters in for-
mmittee was
upaign last
ill be made
sizeable to-

county Coming here from 'orsr ss Mon-
'0 is ex- roe, Va., Lieut. Col. Robot Arthur'
Arbor. will become chief in-ructor in Mili-
c° this tary Science and Tactics in the Uni-
s iversity, taking charge of the Coast
ittee in lArtillery Corps work. Colonel Lucas
paign to will have charge of the Signal corps
urchasel and both men will carry oi1 the Ord-
ore hill. nance work.-
enough Colonel Arthur wa graiaed from
will be West Point in 1907 and is an officer of
7 in the 20 years' military experience, of which
merican about two years were spenL overs-as.
of, the After nine months in France. he be-i
came identified with the ?2nd Division

PROGRAM OUT FOR
ALL-LAW SMOKER
Tickets for the All-law smokr to
be held at 7:30 oclock Thursday on
tbe third floor of the Law building,
will be on sale at the door preceding
the event, the price of admission being
50 cents. -
B. Mathews, '20L, will act as toast-
master. Dean Henry M. Bates and
Prof. Evans Holbrook will speak for
the faculty, James McClintock, '21L,
for the juniors and J. C. Carey, '22L,
for the freshman law class.
"Sandy" Wilson's orchestra will
furish the music for the smoker. It
is also planned to put on a vaude-
ville stunt. Cider and doughnuts are
to be served.
TWO TRAINS WILL
CARRY M ROOTERS
Specials to Accommodate 600 Secured
to Carry Enthusasts to
Chicago Game
RO$ND TRIP QUOTED AT $16;
GRANT STAY-OVER PRIVILEGE
Two All-Pullman specials carrying
600 fighting Michigan men and run-
ning under direct orders from the
Union, will pull out of Ann Arbor
promptly at 10;30 on the night of Fri-
day, Nov. 7, starting theWolverines'
annual invasion. of the middle west.
'Complete co-operation accorded the
Union train committee by the railroad
authorities assures success in sending
a record crowd to the game in Chi-
First reservations for Pullmans may
be made at the Union fiom 1 until 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 28, and
on several other days the dates of
which will be announced later in The
Daily. As yet no definite date has been
set to dispose of the regular tickets
for transportation.T
No Retrn. Trip Special
There' will be no special on the-re-
turn trip inasmuch as ,many have ex-
pressed a desire to stay over in Chi-
cago pintil late Sunday night. This
privilege will allow anyone to return
on any train Sunday until the last
one, which leaves at 12:05 midnight,
arriving in Ann, Arbor at 7 o'clock
Monday morning.
The round trip fare to Chicago and
return will be $16.04 with Pullman
rates extra, and the price of the lat-
ter accommodations is to be posted
in the Union. Admission to the gang
including a reserved seat in the Ma.e
and Blue section will be $2.
MAIL ORDERS STOPPED FOR
0. S. U. GAME; 20,000 SOLD
Box Seats Will Be Built to Sell at $3;
Students Can Still Apply Per-
sonally for Tickets
No more student applications for
the Ohio State game will be received
through the mail. Students whcrhave
not yet made their reservations must
come to the athletic office to secure
their tickets. The ticket office is
open from 9 to 12 o'clock in the
morning and from 1 to 5:30 o'clock in
the afternoon.
Owing to the rapid sale of tickets,
a number of boxes on the ground level
will be built for this game. These
box seat tickets will go on sale
Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock, et
$3 each.
More than 20,000 tickets have al-
ready been sold for Saturdays game,

the only seats remaining in either
stand being back of the goal lines.
These side stand seats are going rap-
idly and will be sold 'out bpfore the
game.

EFFORT TO AVERT
COALSTRIKE TODAY,
SECRETARY OF LABOR ;BRINGS
FORTH ELEVENTH HOUR
PROPOSAL
RAIL MEN THREATEN
TROUBLE; ASK RAISE
Prepare for Finish Fight Before
Roads Go Back to Private
Ownership, Is Said
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 22.-While com-
mittees representing miners and ope-
rators meeting in a final effort to
avert the strike of half a million soft
coal miners set for Nov. 1, were on
the verge tonight of parting company
for good, Secretag of Labor Wilson
held them tgethe' over night at least
with a, wage Increase proposal that
ignored union demands for a 30 hour
week.
There was every assurance that the
operators would accept it and every
indication that it would be rejected
bodily by the .miners.
Will Meet Separately
When the joint conference adjourn-
ed until 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon?
it was with the understanding that
the two groups .would meet then andi
make formal answer to the proposal,
after separate consideration. Refusal1
of theminers to accept will bring the
conference- to a close and force gov-?
ernment officias- to resort to other
means to prevent the closing of the
,mines.
Secretary Wilson's offer, which pre-{
vents actual disruption of the pro-
ceeding proposed that wages be in-
creased at the expiration of the
present contract in an amount equal
to the difference between increases int
wages received by mine workers since
July, 1914, and the increase in the
cost of living since that date, that the
strike order be withdrawn and that
the miners continue-at work pending
negotiations on the new scale.
Railway Men Serve Notice
Washington, Oct. 22.-Railroad em-
playes are prepared for a finish fightj
with the railroad administration for
increased wages, time agd a half
overtime and improved working con-
ditions before the government sur-
renders the roads to private control.
Unmistakable notice to this effect has
been served by Timothy Shea of the
firemen appearing before the board of
railway wages and working condi-
tions.
(Continued on Page ix)
1020' HOP NOT BANNED.
BY AFFIRS COMITTEE
When questioned as to the authen-
ticity of the rumors .whic have been
current on the campus to the effect
that there would be no J-Hop this
year, Prof. Louis A. Strauss, of the
committee on student affairs, stated,
that such a rumor was without basis
from his offfce. ]e said that so far as
4e gew the jnir class could hold
their annual j-0p if they so desired.
Therefore, uless conditions unfore-

seen by, or unknown to, the committee.
on student affairs arise, the J-Hop will
be held as susual. The junior engin-
eers will elect the chairman of the
committee, since the lits had the hon-
or last year.

MC FARLAND IEADS
FROSH ENGINEERS
The engineering class of 1923 held
its first election of officers at a meet- lvI
lug Wednesday . The following men
were-ehosen: President. Charles Mc-
Farland; vice-president, Norman Kolb;
secretary, Paul Goebel; treasurer,
Floyd Adams.

New Plan Seeks to Aseertain Fitness
Of Yearlings For Pro-
fession
QUESTIONS COVER GENERAL
INTELLIGENCE OF STUDENTS
General intelligence tests upon
which will be judged Michigan's 'uure'
standing as an engineering college,
will be given all freshman engineers
Thursday and Friday. Tests in arith-
metic, algebra, physics, geometry, and
in "general intelligence" -will verify
high school certificates and show the

D

WILSON'S
HARMON
Jleeting Today
Usual,, I

ii'

(By Associated Pr
Washington, Oct. 22--L
drew from the National
Conference tonight after
fort to obtain adoption c
tive bargaining resolution
defeated by the vote of- a
the capital group.
Although the representat
the public and capital
their intention of remainin
,F~o r~. hn ., r m n i

EN WERE
UT WITH

name ofI
for all
ppointed
to con-
.pus. Hel
:ty, '21;
1 Velde,
r
cted of-
cil with
H. Ma-
six men
team is

and served with it until this divi-
sion left for- home after the var.
Following this he vwas with the tard
Division and subsequently was over
two months in Paris.
Fifty taking Course
At the present time ther ^ s .ome
50 engineering students, chiefly fr-sh-
men, taking the course in the art of
Military Science and Tactics. Tha is
accounted for the fact that this is the
inaugural year of - the course and
freshmen are pric aliy the only
ones eligible.-

REJECTION
GAINING

student's grasp of fundamentals and Trn
his ability to use them. . to restore
The Phln is Entirely New country ev
The six examinations included under dent Wilso
this investigation will be held Thurs-L
day and Friday of this week. Fresh- Secretary
men engineers have been excused from sonar rel
attending alJ afternoon classes in or -presidentb
der that these ' tests may be put conference
through. The examinations, which a predicteo
will be thirty, minutes in length, will Ident Wils
deal primarily with'.the requisites for Meantimi
engineers, but will also tend to show ihd
the student's knowledge in the field.announced
of every day information and experi- et
ne.ident of th
once. Labor afte
The society for the promotion of Labolaft
enginering education is co-operating Lane in
with 32 prominent engineering col- Lane in
leges in the' investigation of more
suitable methods of admission to uni- garded as
versities. The credit of the designinglttinfo
of the examinations. is due Di! Thurs- harmony i
tone, professor of applied psychology final worki
at Carnegie institute. Prof. G. M. dustrial k
Whippel of the education department. With the
assisted Dr. Thurston in this work. suit .of the
Seek Fair (ftandard Gompems t
The fact that students whose talents been rsjec
4nd capacities are not sufficient to bnreject
warrant their success in the engineer- the men
ing profession are permitted to enter
college has prompted this investiga- (Coni
tion, ,which will extend over a period _Cu
f years, and make for a more adequate
and dependable criterion by which a NIPPY
young man's aptitude for engineering
may be judged, and his chances for
success predicted. TIO
Not Army Tests-
These tests bear but a slight re-
semblance to the army tests, being "Short an
more scholastic in character. The in- the commi
vestigation is being designed to meeting to
throw light upon the present day Friday nig
methods of admission to engineering arouse the
colleges. The initial ratings, in corn- utmost inc
parison with the future professional victory ov
achievenents will determine the prac- With thi
tical value of the tests, and will aid tee has obi
students in knowing their abilities. ity to arou

Le next
industri
vidently
M.
Lane Wil
y Lane
rt' of th
but neitli

er
a fe
the
mhi

ted "w
ed on g
sitting
have
tinued

D. Anders
appointed
sident of t
of the
will be h
day oft
her comm
'20E; E.
Velde,
nder cons
he commnit

in Soviet Seen As
by Normal Symptom
the
an- [ That the stage of soviet government
eld through which Russia is passing may
the be a natural evolution is the opinion
it- which Prof. R. T. Crane of the political
J. science department, expressed Wed-
'20.1 nesday before his class in municipal
id- government. He pointed out that the'
tee era of guild government in England.
followed, the period of the village com-,
munity, and that the soviet in Russia
is strongest where the mirs, or vil-
jlage communities, are- most numerous.
In its essential of being government'
j by industrial classes, he pointed out,
the soviet system is the same as the
old guild system of a thousand years
ago in England. That the Bolshevists
have adopted the soviet system as
4their platform, he said, does not mean
that the sovipt has its bgasis In their
radical ideas.
In his opinion, explanation of the
ponditions in Russia may be based on
the fact that the country is a thousand
years pehiid western European na-
tions in point of development and evo-
. -I lutiai.

rd snapp
ttee in c
o be hel
ght in H
student
cheering
er Ohio.
s eid in
tained sp(
mse-enthi

1

e will be a meeting of
ntgtives appointed by the
of all fraternities, soror-
nd house clubs ' at -3
today in room 306 of the
Members of the Student
will explain the cam-
hat is being started for
or the loosevelt memor-
is imperative that every
e represented.

KERVIN CHOSEN PRESIDENT
IN SENIOR MEDIC ELECTION
Senior Medic class elections were
-held Wednesday, and the following
officers chosen: president, J.' A. Ker-
vin;- vice-president, R. M. Cleary; sec-
'retary, Marion Stevenson; treasurer,
H. W. Smith. -
Phi Sigma toHold Meeting
Phi Sigma society will hold a reg-
ular meeting tonight in room B 174
Natural Science building. Prof. R.
W. Sellars of the Philosophy depart-
ment will talk on "Suggestions Upon
the Mind-body Problem."

tioned. . Repres
the program w
Brumm, one of
who is gifted wi
into the spirit of
ing. Ralph Gaul
the students. Co

be

ly settled upon, but he- will 1
'who will represent them capab
Pictures of the team will be 1
on the screen, the newly app
cheer-leader will make his fir
ficial appearance, the Varsity
will be there and Michigan son
yells will be, much in evidence.
will open promptly at 7:30.

ti ..

!

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