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October 22, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-22

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ULY COOLER

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1. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1919.

o SETT[[
IK .
TAKE ACTION
R CONFERENCE FAILS
BRING DESIRED
RESULTS -

E ,,

BE MADE
UP TODAY

) AVE

h Declare
Set-

Associated Press)
>n, Oct. 21. - Failure of
nd miners to settle their
ter a four hour conference
Secretary of Labor Wil-
>rce the government to
prevent the strike of a
miners called Nov. 1.
another effort will be
row, to bring peace to in-
strike tonight loomed big
hand and leaders of the
eaking frankly and grave-
re was little hope.
S. May Interfere
wage scale committees
miners and- operators
g their battles today be-
doors, a strike storm rag-
nate and fedleral agencies
the law firmly convinced
ve to be invoked to save
from untold distress and
ith mines shut down and
month of stock on hand

attack on the unions
Senator Frel.ynghy-
y and reports from
aat the government
strike leaders said
chance of some en-
ment tomorrow,'but
would stand.
n left today's meet-
g the least informa-
as in his mind 4s to
Lt.
se Troops
d that once during
a of President Wil-
strike appeared cer-
perators wee warn-
nes were shut down
1
ned at 'once and op-
ernment with troops
sary to see that the
idequate supply of

'20E NOMINATES
CLASS 'OFFICERS
Senior engineers noiinated the fol-
lowing men for class officers at their
class meeting at 8 o'clock this morn-
ing in room 348 of the Engineering
building: for president, Waldo Mc-
Kee, and H. N. Pierce; for vice-pres-
ident, C. R. Ford, and A. B. Weston;
for secretary, H. M. Anderson and
John Edwards; for treasurer, James
Darbaker, and Earl Wieber. ,
Election of these officers will take
place at a later date, whilch has not
been decided as yet. Junior engineers
will probably nominate their officers
Thursday.
ARTICLES,.STOLEN FROM
UION, VALUED AhT $150
GEORGE HURLEY ASKS STUDENTS
TO AID IN STOPPING
CRIMES .
Property, valued at more than $150,
has been stolen from various places
in the Union during the past 10 days.
The list of stolen goodp includes two
suit cases, two overcoats, and two or
three caps and hats. The thieves
have become so bold that George
Hurley, general secretary, had his
cap taken from a chair in his. office,
when he stepped out for a few mii-.
utes, and one of the suit cases was
stolen when the clerk's back was
turned.
Huse Detective Consklered.
Union officials are beccming alarpaed
at the extent of the thefts a have
even considered engagig v house de-
tective to stop the losse:. Several
times employes have Ixen close on the
track of the thief, but he always man-
aged to c ape. .
Officials are o the belie '.At stu-
delts are the thieves, and ae inin--
ed to think that more thaii one per-
son is guilty. IHowever, the fact that
the articles are niissed j.st a'l;ut din-
ner time, might roint to thc fact that
one man is guilty of all t crimes.
If the culrit is cazgh , L .v,111 - un
doubtedly be' cismissei from thix Uni-
versity,
Students Asked f 6 -ere
Students are asked by C:orge I'ur.
ley to co-operate in 'patting a stop to
the crimes. "It only gcc3 to siow
that not all of the st dcnt, .c: are
honest. The auihr of the burglary
is not fit to associate with dcent peo-
ple," he stated.
When the brilding is coml'ed, a
check ro>m for articles will be lo-
cated in the corrilor lo:.ts:: to the
main dining room.
"MUNICIPAL BON IJ
BEST INESTMENT"
"Municipal I :xls" was te subect
of Dallas Boudeman s lecture on in-
vestments Tuesday afternoon. In dis-
cussing the subject Mr. Boudeman
stated that he thought that this type
'of bond was the best for investment
purposes because it was safe, profit-
able, and demanded practically no
care.
Cites State Issue
To illustrate the way these bonds
are handled, he cited the $50;000,0WQ
highway bond issue in this state. The
voters of the state voted in favor of
this bond last spring. Recently
$2,000,000 of the issue was put on the
market and a Detroit bank bought
$1,500,000 of it. The bank will sell
these bonds at a slight increase to

people who wish to buy them foi in-
vestments. The state will also sell
the remaining $500,000 of this block
to the citizens in smaller amounts.
"Know that Znunicipal bonds are
authoized by the legislature," said
Mr. Boudeman, in explaining the way
°o tell whether a bond issue is good
or not. "Then ascertain- whether the,
issue was properly voted, that is
whether the election was given the
,;roper amount of advertising.
"Reliable bonding houses always
have a capable attorney to investigate
(Continued on Page Six)
STUDENT COUNCIL TO DECIDE
1MP4ORTANT MATTERS TONIGHT
Friday night's pep meeting, the
:hoosing. of an official cheer-leader,
nd plans for the meeting of all class
fficers are among the matters of im-
oortance that will come up before the
Student council at its meeting at 7:15
o'clock Wednesday night att the Union.

Michigan's official cheer-leader, who
will be picked at the Student council
meeting Wednesday night, a live lot
of speakers and the Varsity band will
combine in making Friday night's pep
meeting in Hill auditorium, in favor
of which the Wednesday afternoon
open-air mass meeting was cancelled,
a success.
Speaking of the meeting, Carl E.
Johnson, '20, president of the Student
council, said, "This meeting, coming
just before the O. S. U. game as it
does, is of the utmost importance and
with this fact in view a short but
snappy program is being arranged
which should send the student body to
the game keyed to the top-notch with
spirit."
While David D. Nash, '20, chairman.
of the committee on arrangements has
not definitely picked the speakers for

OFFICIAL CHE-EAELIVE SPEAKERS, AND
VARISITY BAND ASSURE PEP- MEETING SUCCESS

the evening, his ten' ative list includes
men who have in the past proved suc-
cessful in instilling lfe into mass
meetings.
The first official appea:'ance of Mich-
igan's yell-master with his staff of as-
sistants will be one of the features'of
the evening. With this added incentive
it is expected thAt spirit both at the
meeting and at the game will reach a'
point higher than it has been able to
during the time that the student body
has een without an officially recog-
nized. cheer-leader.,
The full significance of the import-
ance of this neeting can be gained
through realizing what this game
means to Ohio State, whey' the campus
has beer completely postered with
signs reading, "Beat Michigan." It is
expected that Ohio will bring a full
band and some 2,000,students to Ann
Arbor for the game.

MISS MPOOJLE TAKES I
HOSPITAL POSITION
Miss Imogene Poole has accepted the
position as Director of social service
at the University hospital to suc-
ceed Miss Mary C; Meriweather. Miss
Poole formerly held a like position
at the Cincinnati general hospital and
is due to arrive here about Decem-
ber 1.
Miss Poole is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of, Cincinuati _nd has had
training at the New -York school of
philanthropy. At the Cincinnati 'gen-
eral hospital she was responsible for
the 'social service movement and
should be quite an addition to the lo-
cal force.,
NO OCAL DIVE FOR
ROOEVELTMjORIALI

V0LUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS
' PECTED TO FILL CITY'S
QUOTA

EX-.

4 #
R A rr

SHOW DOWN LOOMS
ON TREATY FIGHT
Reservations to Be Sent Before For-
eign Relatons Committee To-
day; Is Said.
MUST VOTE AGAINST TREATY
TO KILL PROPUSALS, DECLARED
(By Assocaited Press)
Washington, Oct. 21.-The question
of accepting peace treaty reservations
was earnestly considered by Demo-
cratic senate leaders under the press-
ure of developments pointing to an
early show down and a ratification
fight.
The treaty prpvision forces opposi-
tion announcing at last an agreement
on a reservation program by the sen-
ate majority brought the situation to
an unexpected issue, serving notice
that their proposal would go before
the foreign relations co inittee to--
morrow when the administration
would be asked to go on record as
accepting or rejecting it.
Program Pcsented
The reservation program as it is to
be presented was not made public but.
it was understood to embrace nine res-
ervations evolved from suggestions
gathered from many sources. The ufb-
jects .are said to have covered the fol-
lowing: The right of this cauntry to
judge whether its obligations had been
fulfilled in case of withdrawal from
the league; unimpared power of con-
gress to decide questions of peace or
war under article 10; domestic decis-
ion of all domestic questions; Mogroe
doctrihe; refusal to be a party to the
Shantung settlemgnt; setting equal
voting power ip league; congresional
selection of American representatives
at league; limitiation of powers of
such representatives to international
commission and right of international
labor conferences to challenge the
elgibility of American representatives
on international commissions.
Only One Chance of Defeat
Behind the proposal, it is declared
by their sponsors, will stand all of'
the 49 Republicans and at least six
Democrats leaving as a -maximum 41
Democrats opposing them. The ad-
ministration was told their only hope,

SELECT MEMRIAL,
Original Plan to hold Dedication at
Minnesota Game Now
Abandoned
HOPE TO MAKE DECISION AT -
ANNUAL LUNCHEON NOV. 2
Selection of the type and cost of a
memorial to be dedicated by the "M"
club to winners of the "M' who died
in the war will be postponed because
of the wide divergence of opinion' on
the matter, until a re-union meeting
of the organization is held here at the
time of the Minnesota game.
Letters Sent Each Member,
"At first it was intended to solicit
the opinion of the club by circular
postal cards, but too many different
memorials were mentioned by the
members. Letters have now been sent
out to every member of the club, ask-
ing him to be present at the re-
union to be held Nov. 22.
As more than 100 men are expect-
ed to 'attend the luncheon, which is
an instituted custom at the big game
of tdie year, it isthought that a. repre-
sentative memorial can' be chosen
then. Originally it was the idea to
dedicate the memorial at the Minne-
sota game, but it will now have to be
postponed until a later date.
Bronze Tablet Favored
The greatest number of men favored
a bronze tablet, to be placed in the
Ferry field club house. Such things
as an arch. entrance or an athletic
scholarship fund were also suggest-
ed. More than 400 men belong to the
"M", club, membership in which is
limited to those who have won a letter
in athletics.
Blarbers _To Start.
At Unionc Friday
Friday is the date set for the open-
Ing of the barber shop in the base-
mient of the Union. By that time the
new emporium of hair cuts will be
completely fuished, equipped, and

blishment of the fuel admin-
Jlso was discussed by offi-
was contended that the food
t gives the government full
require them to work pend-
nent of wage demand.

.
'LABOR SITUATI
NOW BETTER 1T
RE1PORTS I N0D
-PROFESSOR
CURRENT FEELING CAU
GROUP REPRESENT
PUBLIC
GOMPERS IS DRAMA
FIGURE OF CONFE
Employers' IJojectlon to
Caused by Fear alLo
Control
As one listens to the de]
of the labor conference at
ton, he feels that somehow
tion is not as hopeless'as
paper reports would indicat
Upon analysis it turns out
feeling is deriv'ed from th
of the group which rep"E
p'ublic and which occupies t
of the conference room.
group is made up of the tin
leaders of the labor union mo
America, practically all of
officers of the American Fed
Labor and the Railway Bro
There is more solidarity in
than in any other, and they
the most skilful parliamen
the conference.
Employers Are Same
The employers are much
type o, men, forceful, obst
dently accustomed to succe
is more evidence of reliance
legal profession in this gr
among the representatives
They are more in need of a
counsel than Mr. Cmpers an
leagas, for in the space ,i2
pillars at the back of the
group sits a .whole bevy (

No campaign such as has been put
on in oher cities for the purch e of
the Theodore Rgosvelt birthpla e will;
be conducted in.Ann Arbor. Instead
only voluntary subscriptions will be
asked, each contributor of $1 or mor
to receive a bronze pin. The emblem'
has a good likeness' of the Colonel
thereon and the name of the fund
around the edge.A
Contributions wil be received froms
the students and faculty by Mrs. F.
R. Waldron, Miss Annie Condon and
Mrs. Wm. IFe s.Hebs
National Canpaign Started
A national 'campaign for $1,000,000
has been started by the women of the
country to purchase the birthplace of
Theodore Roosevelt at 26 West 20th
street, New York.
The house' in which our ex-pre i
dent was born has been demolished
but the house next to it is an exact
reproduction. The plan is to buy the
property of both and build on the
spot where the original stood an ex-;
act replica. In this house will be all
the family portraits which are avail-
able, the original furnishings copied
exactly, all the books *hich Colonel
Roosevelt wrote, and a cotuplete 11-
brary, of tle books on thei subject in
which he "'as interested, This collec-
tion will be open to the public as a
free circulating library and slipport-
ed by the fund which will soon bea
raised.
Will Be Used as Hall
The copy of the Roosevelt house1
will be used as a hall in which lec-
tures may be given on the subjects in
Which.,Roosevelt was interested and
for the promotion of his ideals,. Amer-
icanism and education. Classes f9r
foreigners to teach them Americ n
ideals will be held here also.
This campaign is entirely separate
from the one which is being conducted
for $5,000,000, to be used in the pur-l
chase' of the family home at Oyster
Bay, the building of a memorial and
the establishing of a memorial fund
for better education, about which
there will gpon be an article.
Mrs. Leonard Woo is the honorary
'president of the organization which
includes many of the -country's mnost
prominent women.
PROF. E. R. SUNDERLAND TELS
OF NEiT PUBLICATION OFFICES
Present System, Explained to 24 Rep-
resentatIves at Dinner
Tuesday Night
Twenty-four representatives of the
various Student publications were pre-
sent at a dinner given by Prof. E. R.
Sunderland Tuesday evening at the
Union. Pr'fessor Sunderland explfin-
ed the plan of the new general offices
of Student publications. The Daily,
the Chimes, the Gargoyle, the Michi-
ganensian, and the Student Directory.
- The new offices will occupy the sec-
and floor of the Press building. Mod-
ern equipment throughout will give
the new quarters an atmosphere of an
up-to-date business office. Professor
Bunderland also explained the ne w sys-
tem of bookkeeping, which will mate-
rially assist the business department,
and' make for greater efficiency.
The offices of the different publica-
tions will be separated by railings
lnan fl. now Oaf nlr,. 'nr ll annldonf

ITTSBURG

Hoboken, Oct. 21.-A riot in which
pistol shots were fired broke up a
meet'ing of longshoremen here to-
night when T. V. O Connor, president
of the International Longshoremen's
association, after having 9fficially de-
clared the strike of New York, water
front workers at an end, appeared to
urge strikers here to return to' work.
Pittsburg, Oct. 21.-Rioting which
broke out in the Braddock steel mill
district today was renewed tonight
when 50 strikers and their sympa-
thizers clashed with several workien
who had just left one of the' plants
,shortly before 7 o'clock. One man
was shot during- the melee and man-
others were injured. State troops
rushed to the scene and rode into the
lnob using riot clubs freely and fin-
ally dispersed the rioters.
,USSOURI UNIVERSITY DEAN
VISITING RELATIVES HERE
Dean Walter Miller, '84, of the
Graduate faculty of the University of
Missouri, Columbia, Mo., is visiting
Ann Arbor relatives for a few days.
Dean Miser is a former faculty
member of the literary college. He
was acting assistant professor of Lat-
in in 1888-89, instructor in Greek in
1886-87, and instructor in Latin in
1887-88.
Last spring he was one of the
speakers at the great patriotic meet-
ing in Hill auditorium. He served
during the war as a Y. M. C. A. work-

of the Endicott-Jbhnson -comps
Landon, of the American eF
comany; of socialists, like Spa
Russell; of men politically
like Baruch and Chadbourne.
Group Has Great Coherei
Composed of people of wide13
gent interests, this group gas
developed a surprising degree
herence. The repolution for cc
bargaining was written by Mr. I
and Mr. Russell, and the first
in its support was made by Mr.
feller. The conciliatory attit
these public repr'esentatives, it
tive of class interests, and the
ated commonsense of their utt<
are the hope of the conferenee.
Gompers Dramatic Lead
The most dramatic figure at I
ference is easily Mr. Gomper
many years since an Wimporta
influential part of the Americf
lie resorted to every legal m
an attempt to put him behind
bars. The events of recent yea
put that highly respectable
of our citizenship to shame.
employers, representatives of t
lic, and visitors at the confer
him honor. No one knows bett
labpr how to capitalize such
tion. And yet Mr. Gompers' sr
impassioned an4 a bit bombasti
intelligible'the English labor
attitude toward the .President
American Federation of Labe
shibboleths ands arguments are
the problems of the generat
which Mr. Gompers first attain
minence as a labor leader.
Employers Objeet" to Props
The employers group is obje
the proposals of the abor
largely because ft feels hat t
trol of the situation is passing
the hands of those who are rej
ig labor at the conference
is needed to transfer the "reim
the hands of the radical elem
refusal on' the part off the en
group to accede to -the propc
Mr. Gompers and his follower.
accomplished, the conflict wil:
tween the employers and the I
In that contest the employer
.upon the 'support of -the great
j class with its power, financ
military. They have less confi!
the supp6 t of the public' 1' a
between employers and the
of the A. F. of L.
From listening to the debaeo
resolution for. collectivi ark

of defeating the program was to vote ready for opening by its manager,
aine rtifiratir afte the rra-

against rai ncai on aiert ine reserva-
tions had been put into the'resolution.
INTER-FRATERNITY STEWARDS -
TO JIEET TONIGHT AT UNION
Discussion of Constitution and Co-
operative Buying to Be Order
of Evining
For the purpose of passing on a
constitution which will provide a per-
manent organization and regular
monthly meetings, there will be a
meeting of the Inter-fraternity stew-
ards at 7:15 o'clock Wednesday night
on the third floor of the Union. This
meeting was, through an error, previ-
ously announced for Tuesday night.
It is also intended to bring up again,
at this time, the question of co-opera-
tive' buying and, if possible, to reach
a definite decision. The two plans set
forth by Mr. Slifer and Mr. Konold
will be taken up and discussed.,\

James H. Hooper, a barber in northern
Michigan for 30 years, and a member
of the Michigan state board of barber'
examiners.
Eight barer chairs will be used by
the new establishment, which is said
by ,many people td be the best in the
state of Michigan. Duling the, week
only five will be in operation but on
week ends all eight will be in use.
Prices will be the same here as else-
iwhere in Ann Arbor. Hours for the
shop will be from 8 to 6 o'clock and
on Saturdays to 10 o'clock.

I-
1'-

CAMPUS CLUBS, NOTICE!
All campus societies wishing
a list of their officers. in the Stu-
dents'-Directory must leave stuh
a' list at the Directory office ,this
afternoon.

11

,

only,newn LL OPUeSV S W
.1 the present equipment.

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