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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 04, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

dh

t. rt x t

111

D IAY GNU N1IHT w
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1920.

PRICE THRER CE

LETES

ARRIVE

FOR

MEE'

Pict Clear
Skies For leet

SENIORHS TO HOLD
SECOND SING AT
SEVE-N TONIGHT

.U 111 Weather reports for today and to-
orrow indicate that the twentieth
annual Conference meet will be con-
ducted in most favorable weather. The
governmeLt forecast fromg Detroit in-
STUDENTS dicates continued fair weather with a
slight rise in temperature.
With the same fair weather, which
marked , Thursday, the Conference
meet should ba run off under excellent
S conditions. Steve Farrel stated that
CILMLN Thursday would have been an ideal
day for a meet and with such weather
zn Friday and Saturday nothing more
Informally 1could be honed for.
Says He said that an athlete works best
in warm weather, and that with such
ideal conditions probable good rec-
cil", an in- ords should be made in all the events.
, has been Few clouds were seen in the sky, and
the mild breezes, which were in evi-
>r thepur- dence could not do much toward slow-
y and stu- 'ng up, the speed in the track events.
closer un- Professors in the astronomy depart-
s problems ment would make no comment on
ol through what course the weather would take,
saying, that they relied on the repots
ton,. Dean of the weather department.
ill have no Attendance at the Conference meet
s, but will depends largely on the kind of weath-
in an in-, er, and with clear skies and a mild
ns of inter'- temperature, the roads from Detroit
function is and Jackson will probably be filled
with autos coming to Ann Arbor.

BAND WILL BE ON HAND
PLAY MICHICPAN
SONGS

TO

VISITING ATHLETES TO
WITNESS CEREMONY

Committee Urges All Last Year
To Appear In Caps
ridlnn

Men

. and gowns
Michigan's second 1920 Senior Sing
will be held at 7 o'clock tonight near
the campus band stand.
The University band is to be pres-
ent to help the Seniors sing some of
the old college songs. All Seniors are
requested to appear in caps and
gowns promptly at 7 o'clock as the
sing will last only until 8 o'clock.
The turn out at the last sing was
not as large as was expected and it is
the desire of the committee that all
the Seniors be present tonight in order
to make this a success.
The visiting track men will be in-
vited to witness the ceremony.
CAMPUS BUILDING
NEARS COMPLETION
All construction and remodeling
work now under the supervision of the
buildings and grounds department
will be completed within the time
specified in .plans, if present condi-
tions prevail, according to a stite-
ment issued from the department to-
day. Betsy Barbour dormitory is now

SP OT CHAIRMAN
rindley, McManIs, and Underwood,
Are To Head Three Sub.
Committees
ECRETARIES TO BE.CHOSEN
FROM DRUIDS AND VULCANS
Announcement of the officers of the

Pietorial Edition
ReadyFor Sale
Three thousand copies of the spec-
ial Daily rotogravure edition contain-
ing pictures of the visiting athletes
will be placed on sale at the various
book stores, on the street, and at Fer-
ry field early this afternoon.
The majority of the papers to be
printed were run off Friday afternoon.
and only-a few remained to be pub-
lished this morning. However, more
than sufficient to care for the local de-
mand will be ready, 750 copies being
reserved for the alumni.,
The rotogravure edition, which prac-
tically corresponds to a souvenir pro-
gram, will sell for 10 cents. Printed
in a beautiful shade of green ink on
a light brown paer, the edition rep-
resents the latest achievement in the
way of college ~rotogravure sections.
Immediately after the track meet is
over, The Daily will publish a sum-
mary of the meet with a running story
of each event.
TRI P CLUB GIVES
Specialty Acts Have Been Added To
Pacific Coast Trip .
Program
HART TO GIVE MONOLOGUE;
BLACK-FACE ACT ON BILL
Commencement concert, the last of
the year - to be presented by the Glee
and Mandolin /club, will be given at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Many new numbers which will be
presented in addtion to the trip con-
cert program have been secured by
the Glee club. Only the men who
made the Pacific Coast trip will ap-
pear.
In addition tothe club members will
be three specialty acts and a jazz or-
chestra. Tom Hart, is on the bill for a
monologue which is promised to in-
clude his latest song hits. The other
specialties include a whistly act and
a blackface skit."
Following the concert a dance open
to the public will be held at the Arm-
ory until 2 o'clock.
23 GRADUATE FROM
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Prof. Albert A. Stanley announces
the following graduates in the various
departments of the University School
of Music: piano, Edith Staebler, Ger-
trude Flowerday, Grace Richards;
vocal, Marcia Coburn, Katherine Far-
rah; violin, Henry Hugh Altater;
organ, Elsie Eggleston-Keinpton, Har-
ry Evans.
Normal diplomas will be given to'
the following: piano, Johanna Klap-
haak; vocal, Lillian ?oole-Harten;
public school music department, Anna
Barton, Helen Marshall, Angenette
Martin,, Ruth Clancy, Katherine Far-
rah, Flora Kelley, Edith Love, G. Fay
McDougall, Margery Reynolds, Fran-
ces Ritchey; public school drawing
department, Elizabeth Ambrose, Helen
Marshall, Anna Barton.

LAST ISSUE SATURDAY
The last regular issue of The
Michigan Daily for the present
school year will appear tomor-
row morning. However, a spec-I
ial detailed sporting extra con-
taining summaries of the Con-
ference meet will be published
immediately after the last event
on the program Saturday after-
noon.
Anyone desiring notices to be
printed in this last issue must
have the copy at The Daily of-
fice before 6 o'clock tonight. No
copy will be taken after that
time.
MENTOR SYSTEM MEETS
WITH. STUDE01,NT FAOR

TRIALS IN WEIGHTS
VAULT TO START
2 O'CLOCK

AND I
AT

COMMITTEE OF THR1E
FRATERNITY MEN
CHOSEN

NON-

ro-
m-

PRELIMINARIES IN SEVEN 'EVENTS
TO BE RUN Off THIS AFTERNOON;
CALIFORNIAR ULES AS FAVOIT

almost completed.

The finishing is

f the

s; T. B. Doyle,
r class; J. C-
reshman class;
-arl G. Brandt,
'22L, the last

I;

LAWSI

BE

e 3.-All war laws
r Food Control act
ith the -enemy act
ed by a resolution
he House, 323 to 3.
aws,. most of them
icretionary author-
lent as long as the
ar continues, would
ie statute books by
e action, a repeal
ent to the Senate
is expected before
Saturday. House
ed that President
rove the measure,
nolly of Texas as-
esident was to sug-
ns oif the war act.
the Lever act was
ssary to give the
etive law for curb-
necessities includ-

Student committee on athletic affairs,
for next year was made yesterday by
Alan W. Boyd, '21L, general chairman
of that committee during the pad
year. Russell C. Barnes, '20, was
named general chairman, and his com-
mittee chairmen are Robert F. Grind-
ley, '21E, eligibility; John E. McManis,
'21, publicity; and Thomas I. Under-
wood, '22, activities.
To Repriesent Honor Clubs
It is planned to request one repre-
sentative from the senior honor socie-
ties, the Druids and the Vulcans, and
these men will fill the posts of secre-
tary-treasurer and secretary of em-
ployment. Sphinx and Triangles will
each have two men on the committee
to act as assistants. ,
In accordance with thenconstitution
of the committee, the new officers
were named by a board composed of
the retiring chairman, one member
of the committee, and one representa-
tive of the board of directors of ath-
letics.
Five Served
The committee chairmen who'have
served during the past year are' Rob-
bert Cook, '20E, eligibility; Russell C.
Barnes, '20, publicity; David B. Landis,
'20L,, activities; and Walter S. Riess,
'21L, employment; and Herbert L.
Popp was the secretary-treasurer.
SENIORS NOTICE
Senior literary banquet tick-
ets will be on sale from 2 to 4
o'clock this afternoon in Uni-
versity hall. Both men and wo-
men are expected to attend.

practically all done and there yet re-
mains the hangingof the doors, the
decoiating and the installation of the
remaining electrical work and plumb-
ing. .
At the present time work on the
president's house is being carried'on
with as much speed as possible accord-
ing to E. C. Pardon, superintendent of
the building and grounds committee..
Finishing on the ,third floor of the
house is now under way, and general
repairing and plastering on the lower
floors is progressing.'
In University hall the partitions di-
viding the auditorium into six class
rooms as provided by the regents are
all in place, and the plastering has
now been started More than a third
of the foundation for the new nurses
home has been completed according to
the buildings and grounds depart-
ment.
SMITH PROPOSES BILL TO
LOWER PRESIDENT'S SALARY
Washington, June 3.-A bill provid-
ing for the reduction of salary of the
President of the United States from
$75,000 to $50,000 a year was intro-
duced today by Senator Smith, Demo-
crat of Georgia. Senator mith also
introduced a resolution proposing an
amendment to the constitution which
would limit the president to one term
of six years.

That the plan of adopting a mentor
system for incoming freshmen is meet-
ing with the approval of the student
body is evidenced by the hearty re-
sponse to '(he call of the Union com-
mittee in charge of securing 250 upper-
classmen to serve as "big brothers"
to first-year men next fall.
Reports from the committee of six
men appointed to make a complete,
canvass of all fraternities and house
clubs indicate that their 'work has
been successful.
As the result of a "meeting of inde-
pendents at 3 o'clock yesterday in the
Union, John Kennedy, '21E, John Stew-
art, 21, and George Reindel, '22, were
chosen as a committee to secure the
names of non-fraternity men who will
aid in this. scheme of having upper-
classmen oversee the work of fresh-
men.
As it will'-require several weeks to
complete the work, the committee has
decided to mail notifications of the
proposed work during the summer to
the men appointed as mentors. It is
also requested that the men return in
time for the opening of the fall semes-
ter, when it is expected a meeting of
all those upperclassmen chosen will
be held.
ONLY TWO TEAMS
IN LATE LAST NIGHT
Only two teams, California and Mis-
sissippi, of the 24 entered in the meet
had arrived at a late hour last night.
-The rest of the squads were expected
on late trains Thursday night or early
Friday morning. The teams will be
taken care of at the Union.
Four banquets will be given in con-
nection with the meet and general
Conference athletic affairs. Athletic
directors will be guests Friday noon,,
the coaches will be dined Friday even-
ing when places will be drawn, and
faculty representatives will meet Sat-
urday noon and Saturd'ay night at'
banquets.
No admission will be charged for
the preliminaries this afternoon. Ap-
proximately 1,200 tickets have been
sold for Saturday, but with fair weath-
er which will bring in many from De-
troit and the rest of Michigan, a large
gate sale is expected.'

MICHIGAN SQUAD MAY
SPRING BIG SURPRI'SE
Five Universities Considered Probable
Winners; Others Have Out-
side Chances
One hundred and seen-five athletes
representing t24 colleges and univer-
sities of the west are here today to
e part in the first Western inter-
col iate track and field meet ever
held under the auspices' of the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
With them come numerous support-
ers, among whom will be hudreds of
Wolverine alumni who have to come
to witness the twentieth annual Con-
ference meet. Preliminaries in the
javelin, discus, hammer, shot put, pole
vault, 440, and 880 will be run off this
afternoon. The four weight events
and the pole vault are scheduled for
2 o'cl ck, and the half milers are bill-
ed to go on their marks at 4 o'clock.
The quarter milers start their trials
at 5 o'clock.
Six Best Qualify
' Men, who finish first or second in
their heats, will have qualified for the
finals. In the weight events and pole
vault the six men with the best rec-
ords will be entitled to fight. it out
for the next day, although the indi-
vidual's best mark of the two.days
will be counted for placing.
At least five universities are con-
sidered probable winners of the meet,
and nearly as many others are con-
ceded an outside chance of carrying
off the laurels. Judging from the past
performances of the Pacific coast ath-
letes, California reigns the supren,.
favorite, the size of their team having
little to do with their chances to win.
,In the intercollegiate at Philadelphia
Saturday, Pennsylvania took rst
honors with only five men placing,
and as the California men were not in
the best form and also -against harder
competitfon the Bruins stand some
chance to duplicate here what Phila-
delphia did in the East this year.
Illinois Also Favorite
,With Johnson far from the best of
condition and Losch out of the meet
with a strained tendon, a Wolverine
victory is doubtful, although the Mich-
igan team may spring a big surprise.
Illinois reigns as favorite behind Cali-
fornia, due to their indoor record and
many victories on the cinders. A Wis-
consin win is not at all 4nprobable,
the Badger squad having defeated Illi-
nois and displayed exceptional 'talent.
Banking their hopes on the abili-
ties of a few Chicago men, the Ma-
roons are hoping for a win. With a
number of good men Missouri, Ne-
braska, Kansas Aggies, Purdue and
Minnesota are 'liable to break into tie
winning column.
Scholz of Missouri is superior to
the rest of the entries in the 100 yard
dash, although Colby, bw; Cook,
Michigan; Moorehead, Ohio; Kelly,
Minnesota, and Maleckar, Wisconsin,
will push him hard." In the 220 Schlz
is again favorite with Emery, Illinois;
Hendrixson, California; Kelsey, Wis-
consin, and the Ohio and Minnesota
men to be counted' on for competi-
tion.
(Continued on page 3)

MihgnDaily
PICTORIAL EXTRA
On'sale noon today at all'
news stands.

T

0

N

I

G

H

T

DANCE at ARMORY
AFTER CONCERT

nni~

Glee and Mandolin Club
CONCERT and DANCE

TILL 2

$1.50

TICKETS AT BOOKSTORES

...........

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