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May 26, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-26

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 1920.

rior Aechanism Of Modern
Newspaper Explained by Ryan

w

In a short talk made lively by his
gorous and witty phraseology,
Quin" Ryan explained the inside
orkings - of the Qhicago Tribune in
ie Natural Science auditorium last
ight.
With the aid of stereopticon slides
e gave an excellent presentation of
e work in a metropolitan newspaper
ant, from the methods of news
thering to the final appearance of
ie printed'story. ,
A'n outstanding feature of the lec-
re was the emphasis given to the
rsonal and individual side of news-
iper work and his anecdiotes about
.e well known members of the Trib-
ae staff made evident the good. feel-
g and co-operation that prevails on
at daily.
Beginning his talk with an account
the manner in which he entered
urnalism, Ryan well illustrated the
ethod by which reporters are trained
the MNysteries of "pic" chasing and
ws gathering, -by his personal rem-
iscences.
The major part of thA talk con-

cerned the procedure :n the office in
getting the news, editing it, and pass-'
ing it on to the composing and press
rooms. In a paper that daily fills 270'
columns with news its is evident that
an unfailing system must be perfect-
ed and Ryan, explained what methods-
the Tribune uses to get this result.
Emphasizing the necessity of
speed in journalistic work, Ryan cited
an instance when an extra copy of his,
paper had been prepared and on the
streets in 20 minutes from the, time the
press was stopped to admit the big
story."
In commenting on reporting and
what constitutes good reporting, Ryan
said, "The Tribune reporter is trained
to look upon himself as the represen-
tative of the world at the event which
he is covering."
As evidence that the special depart-
ments of the Chicago paper are popu-
lar, Ryan stated that in 1918 B. L. T.,
the conductor of "A Line o' Type or
Two," received more than 26,000 let-
ters from contributors and that Dr.
Evans answered more than 15,000
health queries in 1919.

'I

PLANS COMPLETED FOR
AMERICAN LEGION POST

JTUAL ORGANIZATION
WILL BE COMPLETED
BY OCTOBER

WORK

ue

s been
re has
he is
with
size of
0 men.

Final plans for the organization of
a campus post of the American Legion
were completed last night when a
1lrge gathering of ex-service men, in-
cliding several members of the facul-
ty and alunmi 'met in the Union As-

sejpb hall.
r With the view of having the actual
work of forming the chapter well ob

tennis team
today to com-
championships
aturday of this
imposed of the
e made 11 the
esbrook, Munz,
will compete
le two teams,
nd Angell and
doubles.
is an excellent
singles event
e was defeated
wo weeks ago.
steadily since
in to give the
his life if they
rook and Munz
ce in the dou-
IL SOCIETY
9 INITIATION

its way before the close of the present
semester, a committee composed of six
men, who are not as yet members of
any Legion posts, was appointed. A
petition for a charter for a regular
post at the University, signed by 15
men, also non-Legion members, will
be presented to national headquarters
by this committee within the next 10
days.
As, however, the actual acceptance
and formal presentation of the charter
will involve a matter of several
weeks, those men who will attend
Summer school will take up the real
work of the organization. Thus, with"
the re-opening of the regular school
term in, October, all that will be nec-'
essary for present Legion members
will be-to secure a- transfer from
their home posts. The process, for
non-members will be to siign certifi-
cates stating their desire to join, and
they may then enter as regular mem-'
bers of an established post with full.
rights and privileges.
i
SENIO) LITS TO DISCUSS
IMPRTANT TOPICS THURSDAY
The Senior lit meeting scheduled
for today, after being postponed' from
last week, was put off until Thursday,
because of the Notre. Dame baseball
game. It will be held at 4 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in room 101of the

FOREIGN WAR VTS fIL
ESTABLISK _LOCAL POST
STATE AID TO OFFICIALLY TAKE
IN EX-SERVICE MEN
FROM CAMPUS -
Having - completed all necessary
plans for the organization of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, the members
of the campus post will assemble at
7:30 ocloAk this evening in room 306
of the Union, where the state aids of
the Veterans of Foreign Warspf Mich'
igan will address them.
The Ann A rbor post of the Veterans
of, Foreign Wars will be officially tak-
en in by the state aides tomorrow
night, after which they will address
ex-service men in the Union. A drum
and bugle corps from Musician post
395 of Detroit will also be present to
provide the music.
Approximately 60 ,overseas men on
the campus have' signified their inten-
,tion of joining the local post, which
will be officially established on June
2, by representatives e. the national
organizatioi.
The' proposed name of the campus
branch will be the Richard Hall Post,
in memory of the first Michigan man
to be 'killed in the war. He lost his
life Christmas, 1915, while serving
with an American ambulance unit at-
tached to the French army. His father
is Dr. Louis P. Hall of the Dental
school.
-Cercl Fra ncais
Ends Year's Work
Concluding the year's activities with
a spread,;,.speeches, and initiation, the
Cerce Francais held its annual ban-
quet at the Union last night.
The program was varied and inter-
esting, a novel feature being that
speeches and conversation were car-
ried on entirely in French. Prof. M.
Arthur Oanfield presided as director
of toasts. Speakers for the evening
were: M. Everett L. Hackes, on "The
Year of the Cercle," M. Stewart
Beech, "Answers to the New Men,"
M. Lawrence H. Seltzer, "Duties of the
Cercle," M. Talamon, "Why We Study
French."
The officers for next year are: Wil-
liam Graves Sharp, Jr., '22, president;
Margaret Beckett, '22, vice-president;,
Bee Warsan, '22, secretary; Edward
Moor, '21, treasurer.,
The inner workings of the Cercle
were disclosed to the following after
the first address: Edward Seymore,
'23, Adrian R. Jones, '22, Fay Ken-
rick,+'22,'Harold Allan, '23, Marjorie
West, '21, Ellen Canfield, '23, Flor-
ence Thieme, '23, Harold Votey, '23,
Athalie Hough, '22, Byron Jiras, '22,
Henry Ranst, Margaret Beckett, '22,
Stewart -Beech, '22.°

Committee Meeting for Consideration
of President's Request
Causes Comment
DEMOCRATS EXPECT IMMEDIATE
REFUSAL BY G. 0. P. FACTION
Washington, May 25 - The House
foreign affairs committee' will meet
tomorrow to consider President Wil-
'son's request that he be. given author-
ity to accept a mandate over Armenia.-
Announcement tonight by Chairman
'Porter that the committee had been
called to take up the proposition and
that Secretary Coly'y be the first wit-
ness caused widespread comment
among those who had believed early
in the day that the, whole ;question
would go over until the redess.
There was no intimation as to the
season for immediate consideration.
Democrats,. outspoken in their oppo-
sition, said they construed it to mean
the Republicans had decided to act
immediately on the President's request
and refuse to grant it.
The question was discussed during
the day by Republicans at a number of
informal conferences, anti the opinion
was expressed that in the event Con-
gress fails to act and adjourns until
December, the President might call a
special session for its consideration.
Chairman Porter in a statement
said he had not had time to confer
with all the members of the committee
but that "he regarded the proposition
of sending American soldiers to Ar-
menia or any other foreign country as
absurd."
PI DELTA EPSILON
INITIATES EIGHT'
Seven active and one honorary mem-
ber were admitted to the ranks of Pi
Delta Epsilon, national honorary jour-
nalistic fraternity at its annual spring
initiation held yesterday at the Union.
Those initiated were:,Robert C. An-
gell, '21, William F. Angell, '21, George
Cadwell, '21L Robert Drake, '21, Theo-
dore Gustafson, '21E, Boyd Logan, '21,
and Quin A. Ryan (honorary).
Following the initiation a banquet
was held at the Union. The speakers
were C. Stewart Baxter, '21, William
F. Angell,. '21, Prof. E. R. Sunderland,
J. Pembroke Hart, '20, and Mr. Ryan.
Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, acted as toast-
master.
NEW YORK LIFE
SHOWN IN MOVIE
New York, the real New York, is ac-.
curately portrayed in that cross sec-
tion of the seething life of' the great
metropolis shown in "On with the
Dance," the movies to be given at
7:30 o'clock Thursday night in Hill
auditorium under the auspices of the
Ulion.
Although many of the scenes are of
cabarets and luxurious rooms, the life
of theimmigrant is shown in abrupt
contrast. The story throbswith the
most vital of human emotions. Love,
hatred, and brning jealousy vie ith
each other and overlap in their occur-
rences. The characters are all paint-i
ed by an excellent cast as real live-
people who become stranded in pecu-
liar circumstances.
The acting of Mae Murray who

takes the leading role as the masked ]
dancer is comparable to the work of
John Barrymore in his, recent master-
piece, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." And
not the least among the many accom-
plishments that she displays in "On
with the Dance" is her grace and abil-,
ity as a dancer. The wonderful set-
ting of the cabaret scenes provides an
appropriate background for her danc-
ing when she comes from behind the
.curtains into the full glare of the
spotlights to do her turn as the]
Masked Dancer.
Tickets for the movie will be plac-
ed on sale today in the camnus bookj
stores and down-town. Contrary to
yesterday's 'announcement the price
will be 25 cents.
YPSILANTI BOY JAILED FOR]
$800 FRATERNITY THEFT1
John Perry, 18-year-old Ypsilanti
boy, is in the county jai, on a charge
of steaing $300 worth of clothes from
the Phi Rho .Sigma fraternity- house.

PUBLICATIONS WILL
BANQUET AT UNION
Members of the staffs and try-outs
on all student publications will hold
their annual banquet at 6 o'clock
Thursday evening in room 316-20 of
the Union.
Prof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric
department, will be toastmaster at the
banquet. The newly appointed heads
of 'all the publications will be called
upon to speak. Prof. John L. Brumm,
of the rhetoric department, will also
speak at the banquet.
The appointments of assistants will
be announced at this time, but the
fobs for the members of the staffs
have not been secured as yet. Tick-
ets for the banquet can be secured
free of charge by students working one
publications from Miss Allen at the
Press building until 6 o'clock Thurs-
day night.
COA'ST T ME N
TO GI1VE CONCERT
Commencement Entertainment in Hill
Auditorium Planned for Fist
Week in June
GLEE AND liMANDOLIN CLUB-
FILL GIVE REVIEW
Making its last appearancefor the
year, the 1919-20 Varsity Glee and
Mandolin club will give a Commence-
ment concert at i8 o'clock Friday,
June 4, in Hill auditorium. It was
deemed particularly appropriate by
the management to term the concert a
Commencement one inasmuch as' it
will be the last chance of the gradu-
ating class to hear the combined clubs.
To carry out the idea of a trip con-
cert on' the campus, only the picked
men who made the recent Pacific coast
trip will appear and a program simi-
lar to that offered in the western cities
will be given. Hits of the trip will be
reviewed and "Tom" Hart, '20, of "I'm
Suspicious" fame, will be on hand with
his latest ones..
Jazz Orchestra to Appear
The regular quartets and s'extets
will appear in numbers, among them
being one by the All-campus jazz or-
chestra. In respect ;to the playing of
this organization the club manager has
received a letter from the manager of
the Alexandria Hotel in Los Angeles,
where the flub stayed during its re-
cent trip. The letter says in part: "I
never knew what real 'jazz' was until
-I heard our All-campus orchestra."
Negotiaions are being carried on
with Armory officials and it the hall
can be secured, a dance will follow the
concert. Tickets will go on sale at
a later date.
Play Will Not 'e
ni2y Women
Disrogatding a tradition of long
standing, the senior girls, at the meet-
ing held Tuesday afternoon in Bar-
hour gymnasium, decided not to pr6-
sent a senior girls' play this year.
Whatever is. to take theplace of the

play will be lanned by the commit-
tee.
Announcements were made to the ef-
faet that the senior breakfast will be
held Monday, June 21, at Helen New-
berry residence and that no flowers'
or gloves are to be worn on Com-
mencement day. The girls are to ap-
pear in white dresses and black foot-
wear with their caps and gowns left
open.
Miss Wardner of the University hos-
pital told of the-training that is avail-
able in the Psychopathic hospital here
and at Smith college for University
firlIs in' pschyriatry, which deals with
mental' and nervous cases of 'social
work.
Mrs. Henderson, secretary of the
Central correspondence committee of
Michigan Alumnae, urged the seniors
to join an Alumnae group as soon aft-
er graduation as possible. Mrs. Hen-
derson stated that only one-seventh of
the students who have gone out of
Michigan are members of the Alumnae

WOLV

..

PARKS VICT
BATTLE V

Seoarfng Begins Early in
First and Seventh the L
Innings
Midwest triumphed over
west Vwhen alifornla, chain
the Pacific coast, fell yesterl
noon before ,the attack of
Parks and his men by the e
to 0. The .co'ast men came
enviable 'recod of victories
sented the strongest lineup
opposed the Wolerines this
Russ Ellison, the elongate
nian hurler, who has not los
played during the trip, warn
the Bruins. "His speed an'd e
tracted favorable attention
gan's best battery was crip
the Iowa game, Parks havi
finger and Genebach a sprain
Who would oppose the
Bruins? The .stands were v
glee when UmpIle Egan ar
"For Michigan, Parks and F
The contest was a pitchers'
tween the giant Ellison and
Michigan leader. Park em
victor by blanig Californi
lowing for hits.
Scoring Begins Earl
Michigan's scoring began ii
inning. Knode was hit with
ball. Kirchgessner tripple
Knode and reached home on
by the catcher. From the fr
until the seventh liieither .si
although Michigan had men
and threatened several times
nia threatened in, the openi
wh'en they made two of tb
hits. Good fielding by Mraz a
together with heady pitching
shut off the chances of ti
men.
For fivesucceeding innings
settled down'to a duel betwe
and Ellison. Mihigan thre
the third, fourth and sixth
Twice men reached third bas
die on bases because of tb
fielding and tight pitching o
nia. The coast outfielders "
active in robbing .the Wolv
hits by running lack and ma
catches. Knode and Kir
were each robbed of hits by
lar work of the Bruin outfie
Parks and Knode See
In the seventh inning Mic
creased its lead when Capt
reached first on an error by i
stop. Knode hit safely a
Parks. Kirchgessner laid do
bunt which advanced both
Perringhit safely through
scoring Parks afd Knd,
reached second on a throw
the outfield .and third on a pa
The next two batters failed
safely and an additional ral
short. ,*
California got men on bas
seventh and nintY but th
pitching of the Michigan lcad
up by perfect support spoil
ever hopes they e4ertained
ly. The game was by far the
on Ferry field this year.,
At 4':05 this aftepioon N9
will cross bats with the WOV,
Ferry field. Ruzicka or che
pitch for Michigan. Ruzicka
showing lots of stuff lately
likely choice. Notre Dame
represented with hitters.
WEBB AND FLANGE HLD
INITIATION AND B
\Vebb and Flange, civil engi
orary society initiated' the
men yesterday: R. A. Aiexra
H. G. McManee, '21E, F. R
'21E, H, L. Waha, '22E, H.

120E, P. W. Husted, '21E; H.
'22E, E. A. Krueger, '21E, J.
insk, '21E and M. D. Van
'21E.
After the initiation a ban

IuuU
O f

--

IRMIP

BE

lpha, national h
medical society,
Ltiates at the spr
quet last evening
, who became
was toastmaster
Dr. sA. M. Barr
, Mr. C. - M. Wel
by were the spe
| The new memb
J. F. Gipner, F.
et R. Reynolds,a
are all members

on-
re-
ing
an
of
ett,
ler,
ak-
ers

. Economics building.
and Wilfred B. Shaw, secretary 'of the
of Alumni association, has been secured
to speak to the class on their duties'
as alumni at this meeting. Also the
election of an alumni secretary-treas-
urer and two other members to act as
a committee with this officer as chair-'

er-
n at.
next

man in maintaining a close relation
between the class of '20 and the
school, is to take place at this meet-
ing.
Mary other important questions in-'
cluding the class banquet are to be
decided at this meeting, which is the
}ast before examinations, and William
W. .Hinshaw, president of the class,
urgesyevdryone to attend.
COOLEY AND WENLEY TO SPEAK
AT SENIOR ENGINEER BANQUET
The Senior Engineers will hold a
banquet at 6 o'clock Friday evening
in the Michigan Union. Pat Hogan
will act as toastmaster. Dean Cooley
and Professor Wenley will be the

Thursday's Gawes Announced
Thursday's notramural ball game
Tchedule is as follows: Senior engi-
neers vs, fresh lits, junior engineers
vs. soph engineers. The games will
be called at 4 o'clock at Ferry field. -

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