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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UIVERSITY

xcept Monday during the Univer-
rol of Student Publications.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
xclusively entitled to the use for
hes credited to it or not otherwise
local news published therein.
t Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second

nard street.

-d'300 words, if signed, the Sig-
in print,rbut as an evidence of
e published in The Daily at the,
tt or *mailed: to The Daily office.
eive no consideration. No man-
he writer incloses postage.
rily endorse the sentiments ex-
ill not be received after 8 o'clock

of the earth extolling the fame of Michigan; we
can talk Michigan to every likely prospect in our
home town; we can assure ourselves, and our
friends, that Michigan is.the greatest University in
the world - and yet fail to influence men to see
things as 'we see them. But when we have two
huidred athletic possibilities right here in Ann Ar--
bor all we have to do is show them. Actions, not
words, are the means of conclusively convincing the
most skeptical prospect. If we really believe in the
University we will do all in our power to make fu-
ture Tnterscholastics the biggest, and finest Michigan
dvertisement. _
LECTURES ON JOURNALISM
"Quin" Ryan, the clever sports writer, critic, and
versifier whose work has long enlivened the pages
of the Chicago Tribune, should from reputation
alone draw a large crowd for his lecture tonight on-
"Inside the Tribune." 'The technique and the in-
ner workings of a great newspaper form an unus -
ually absorbing topic, for the uninitiated as well as
those who have had journalistic experience. Those
w.hto have heard the speaker declare that his words
are as pleasant to the ear as to the eye.
Michigan, in view of the rising reputation and
popularity of its journalism department, really de-
serves to have a 'course of lectures on newspaper
writing and organization. Pi Delta Epsilon has
done well in securing a nationally popular speaker,
as the introducer of such an idea, and the main-
taining of the same high standard should be a re-
quirement of the future. A complete annual course
,of talks on journalistic topics will probably be the
aim of the immediate future. The reporter is the
best story teller in the world, as well as an astute
6bserver; and it.ought not to, be difficult to find a
steady and large attendance for such a course.

Biology - Shull
AT

e

Principles of

TWO
STORES

G R A HAM's
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

Anii

p

......HARRY M. CAREY
bert Joseph A. Bernstein
ell Hugh Hitchcock
Renaud Sherwood
uis
..H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
.Brewster Campbell
.John I. Dakin
.Robert C. Angel
. Marguerite Clark
...Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.
Assistants

E.

winefred Biethan
ry) Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
L. P.. Lovejoy
Charles Murchison

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect' May 18, 4920
Between
Detroit, Ann' Arbor, and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit, 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 p. m.r
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:40 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. m. and every two
two hours to 9:45 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5:55 a.x', 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m..
also 11:00 p.m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson - 7:45 a.m., and
12:10 a.m.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-,
er, whether the account be large
or small.
Tbe Ann Arbor, Savings Bank
Incorporated 1&69
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue

MI1111l 111111fEIiil illlllIII11IIIill IIIlii
JUST OUT
Un1ivers'ity ofMichi
Eighteen handeolored ph
ed on handmade paper.I
with yellow and tied witl
Price only'
rll llillll illl i tilnlli[ 11I1 i f1 11 l u1u i1111l

otographs i
Beautifully
h silk cord.

$1.60
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

A BRAND NEW
igan Souvenir

s

.PAUL E. CHOLETTE
rd A. Gaias, Mark B. Covell
.. . . . ..Henry W hiting
.Edward Priehs
t P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan
D. P. Joyce
adter P. P. Hutchi'nson
REaymond K. Corwii
lings Lester w. Millard
ation concerning news for any
ht editor, who has full charge

litors for the
Larnbrecht;
day night, N(

ill be, Monday
night, Robert
>amon;, Thurs-
night, T. P.
Cochrane.

HELLO FOLKS
It has always been a matter of pride with the stu-
dents of Michigan that their University has cus-
toms, traditions, and habits of living peculiar to no
other college in the country. This individuality is
something to be justly proud of if not carried to
too great an extreme. However, even tkfe best of
things can be carried too far if not based on sound
reasoning.
There is a slogan current the world over which
says, "Know thy neighbor." It's a wise old slogan,
too. Yet how many of us ever put it into 'effect?
At Michigan we are prone to go to the other ex-
treme. Each day we meet fellow classmates about
the campus whom we know, and whom we have
everyreason to believe know us, yet we pass them
by without the least sign of salutation.
Why should students who meet daily on common
ground, and in common" discussion pass each other
on the street asthough they had never seen each
other? It is assuredly an over-drawn convention-
ality. Such reserve is not practiced in other uni-
versities of the West. Michigan would do well to
foster more friendliness, and less conventionality
among its student body. - Get to know your neigh-
bor.-
It might pay the laborers to take a course in a
university. The instructors might tell them how to
live on less than $2,500.

A1

TRADE AT
TTHE BLVE FRONT CIGAR STORZ
dos-aer tabtyre nd Packard
8 tuad'e n t Preo pr i et ors

We offer for a Lirited Time
15 Styles of Ladies Oxfords and Pumps
at, 20%discount from our regular prices

1. corbined meeting of the editorial
Ifs at 12:45 o'clock today. A short
editra slaff wil follow.'
PROFITEERING?
iof the price lists of various soda
city indicates that the prie fac-
_se lists has been the policy of get-
ices as possible. -For some drinks
ible in one store what it is in an-
y is shown in a tabulation'of these
:ores eharging high for some drinks
hers. This indicates that the sell-
>t based on costs, but have been de-
>roximation; a survey of the menu
f the stores in this business' shows
s giving himself the benefit of the
ch syrup is used are listed at prices
om I I to 20 cents. *Crushed fruit
om 17 to 25 cents, ginger ale from
d other drinks follow suit.
hich has jumped 35 per cent in cost
has been given a 100 per cent boost
in many cases. Root beer is 6 or
ling on the store the buyer happens
do not include the prices charged
hich the local drink sellers consider
-, as the tap room fountain is not
>rofit. In this connection it is in-
e that the men employed by the
higher wages than those employed
es. It is also the policy of the
luick service and this necessitates
is given by some fountain.mana-
rn for their prices. In some instances
n this intangible source is at least'
ncome of the business, as a price
show.
E INTERSCHOLASTICS
high school athletes were in Ann
c-end vieing with one another for
:erscholastic honors of Michigan.
t is true, a few high schools from
peting, 'one of which carried off the
ay. These, men from all parts of
few scattered sections of the mid-
ur guests last week-end, and each
vay certain irrevocable impressions
their short stay in Ann Arbor.
interscholastic meets should be
f real import in our athletic pro-
ns should, be sent to all likely con-
iddle west. There are many schools
ably enter such a meet if they only
welcome they would be in Ann Ar-
lore teams that send men, the more
oul.d be the meet.

These are from our REGULAR STOCK of HIGH QUA
ITY SHOES, orders for which were placed, in s o m e ca

T

over a year ago.

Our regular prices have been based on

I -

3The Telescope

I

actual cost to us at the time the orders were placed - these
shoes have all advanced in wholesale price, however, f r o m
$2.25 to $3.25 per pair, since these orders were placed, so you
can readily appreciate their true present-day value.
HOW LONG THESE REDUCED PRICES WILL HOLD
WE CAN NOT PROMISE, SO, IF YOU ARE W IS E,
SYOUWILL GET YOURS NOW.

it's a Loze-Bro16 Joke for a' of That,
May festival visitor-Ann Arbor certainly must
be an intellectual town.
Stude-Intellectual? I'll say it is. Why, even
the bootblacks speak Greek in this town.
Where the Rub Comes In
Father-I never imagined a college education
could cost so much.
Son (indignantly)-Yes, and look how little I'm
getting for my money.
Dear Noah: -
The other night a young gentleman said that I "il-
lumined the night" of his life. What do you sup=
pose he meant? .Ima Kohed.
Well Ima, he was probably telling you- in a tact-
ful way that you're moon-faced.
I gazed pityingly at him. He graduated about the
time that I started college and had always been re-
garded as one of the brightest men in the school.
And now I found him as a humble soda fountain;
clerk. Hoping to arouse his spark of ambition I
addressed him.
"Good Lord, Bill, haven't you any intelligence at
all?"
At my words he brightened perceptibly aid in a
dreamy tone of voice he answered, "No, but we
have something just as good."
Sir Walter Raleigh imported this one and the firstt
tobacco into England, with the result that Sir Wal-
ter was beheaded shortly afterwards.
Hi-I'm going to call this. cigar the "American
Lady in a Japanese Kimona."
Eli-Why so?
Hi-Becanse it has a domestic filler and an im-
ported wrapper.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm holding this against you," muttered the
dancer as she saw the stain on her waist caused by
her partner spilling his punch on her.
NO A T-T C TTT

These lots are divided as follows:
LOT WINt-TIP BROGUE OXFORDS-MADE FROM THE FINEST CORDOVAN WITH
i LOW HEELS-THE LATEST STYLE-$18.00 VALUE, NOW.............. ..
IN DULL CALF AND BLACK KID WITH CUBAN AND LOUIS HEELS-
4 STYLES IA LTEm OXFORDS-$13.50 VALUES ........................NOW
IN BLACK SUEDE, DULL KID AND PATENT LEATHER LACE ,OXFORDS
5 STYLES AND PUMPS-$12.50 VALUES-.............................. NOW
LOT PATENT LEATHER OXFORDS, WITH SILK QUARTERS--VERY HANDSOME
$10.00 VALUES .................................................NOW
S SINDULL CALF AND PATENT LEATHER OXFORDS
$TYLE0 $ ALUES ., . .NOW
2 ~51YL.ยง0 VALE.................................-.----NO
1 LOT WHITE SATIN PUMPS-$7.50 VALUES .
TO CLOSE OUT_ ...........................OL
1 LOT WHITE SATIN PUMPS-$5.00 VALUES
TO CLOSE OUT..,..............................................ONLY

,T% 4

$1
$

11

7.20
5.00
4.00

(These satin pumps can be 0iyed to match your gown or hose)
IN ADDITION TO THE BIG SAVING IN MONEY. WE
ASK YOU ALSO TO CONSIDER OU9R "F IT T ING
SERVICE" WHICH MEANS FOOT COMFORT THAT
CAN NOT BE. MEASURED IN DOLLARS.

a

'123 East Liberty Street-Corner

1

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