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October 17, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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IDIAY AND n I4GI
SEE VICI

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1919.

7

PRICE 'I

LI

11,

REGENTS TO PICK
NEW FACULTYMEN
When the Board of Regents gather
Friday morning for their regular
monthly meeting, they will find sever-
al matters of importance awaiting
,their decision. One of the most ur-
gent questions is that .of securing ad.
ditional instructors
Due to the heavy enrollment in cer-
tain courses this year, the present
staff of instructors is overworked, and
it is probable that the appointment
of a number of new faculty members
will be made at Friday's meeting.
ADJURNBEFORE
V OT E 1 5- T K E
Three Hour Debate on Collective Bar-
gaining Ends with No Deels-4
Iion

Only

f

LABOR DELEGATES THREATEN
WITHDR_6WAL FROM CONFERENCE.
legates
hat the
hat the ( By Associated Press) .
nal ac- Washington, Oct. 16.-Recognition of
will be colective bargaining came to thefloor
uculate of the national industrial conference
lent to today and was debated for three hours
of the but a vote was impossible before ad-
journment. Virtual notice was given
1ec by members 'of the labor group that
e con- should the representatives of capital
to take succeed in their attempt to send the
British resolution back to the committee of
S were fifteen, the labor delegation would

I Il

:,

Reported During P. _.
The collective bargaining resolution
w on providing for an endorsement of, the
;re iright of wage owners to negotiate with
arian employers through representatives of.
Only their own choosing," was reported to
o be the conference this afternoon with the
greed approval of all tile public and labor
d the 'delegates in the committee but oppos-
'urk- ed by the representatives of capital.
Realizing that the conference faced"
nt in the chance of disolution unless an
con- , agreement could be'reached on the is-
draft sue, members of the public group. di-
and rected eloquent appeals to the em-
vern- ployers in an effort to win them over.
, ar-. Leading in this effort was John D.
a few Rockefeller, Jr., representative of one
otiate of the htion's greatest industrial or-
ver a ganizations, 'Aho pleaded for "a new
ished !spirit" in industry with universal ree-
ognition of "the right of representa-
tion" by workers who he added-really
gates sought "not higher wages but recogni-
>tiate tion as men."
Allied Defies Employers ,
ether Frank Morrison talng up the issue'
ndate for the labor delegation defied the em-
d are ployers with the challenge that they
f the could not deny nor interfere with "the
right of bargaining a through chosen
representatives" which he said had
been acknowledged by six govern-
reaty, mental agencies as the war labor board
over and the railroad administration and
three was accepted in Great Britiaa, Ger-
rp Imany and other countries.

IMPORTANCE Of PRSS
KEYNOTE DOUR[CAY
NATIONAL JOURNALISTIC MEET
OPENS AT UNION WITH
FOUR .ADDRESSES
With about half of the expected
delegates present the convention of
the American Association of Teach-
er.; of Journalism and State Editors
opened yesterday afternoon. with a
business session followed by a meet-
ing at which four talks were given.
The teachers are from all parts of
the country. Among them are I. W.
Cunlilfe, dean of the Pulitizer School
of Journalyism of Columbia univer-
sity, E. V. Smith, of Leland Stanford
university, Prof. Bleyer, of the 1)ni-
versity of Wisconsin and several oth-
er prominent teachers of journalism.
Chase S. Osborn Speaks
Hon. Chase S. Osbon, former gov-
ernor of the state, and a retired news-
-paper man, was the first speaker of
the afternoon. In his talk entitled
"The Fourth Estate," he outlined the
possibilities and duties of the news-
paper in modern society. He said
that it is the duty of the newspaper
to search continually for and teach
truth, for the respected newspaper of
today exerts an influence in leader-
'ship comparable to that of monarchs
of old.
Newspaper as a Utility
Mr. Ernest F. 'Lloyd, a retired busi-
ness man, who is making a study of
economics, delivered a paper entitled
"is the Newspap'er a Public Utility,"
in which he compared the newspaper
to the railroads as a public utility.
saying that the former were the pur-
veyors of news, the latter of goods.
He concluded thatgoerment has as
much. reason and right to regulate
'the carrying of news to the public,
as it has to regulate the carrying of
goods.
"Compulsory Unit-Ownership of
Newspapers" was the subject discuss-
'ed by Prof. John B. Waite of the Law
school. He set forth his idea that an
individual controlling a string of news-,
papers is in a position to exert ar-
'bitrary authority over ?citizens of a
democracy.
The final talk of the afternoon by
'Floyd J. Miller, of the Detroit News,
entitled "The Super-Morgue," ex-
plained the difference between the old
newspaper "morgue" and the modern
metropolitan newspaper reference de-
partment, such as. that developed by
'the Detroit News.
4 Prof. Fred N. Scott, head of the
Rhetoric department, who is presi-
"dent of the American Association of
Teachers of Journalism, welcomed the
delegates and introduced the speak-
ers.
Hold Smoker at Union
After the get-together dinner in the
new Union dining hall, which is now
nearly completed, the smoker pro-
;ram was launched with te rendition
of Varsity, Victors, America, and the
(Continued on Page Six)
Initial Gargoyle
To .Appear Today
Relying mostly on the short, snappy
type of humor, the Gargoyle makes its
initial fall bow to the public today.
This year's Gargoyle is bigger, better
and funnier than ever before. The
magazine contains many big features,
among them being a cartoon strip
which will appear every issue, carry-
ing Albey Sliderule, '23E, through the
intricate maze of university life. The

popularity of this number does not de-
pend entirely on the briefer forms of
drollery as there are enough long ar-
ticles to make up a well balanced
number. *
Something should be said about the
art this 'year, as it is particularly
good. Besides the colored cover, there
is a clever double page givi.ng good ad-
vice on how to study.

WHITE'S DDESS WILL
BE FREEOF POLITICS
KANSAS EDITOR NON-PARTISAN
ON PEACE MEET; TALKS TO
JOURNALISTS TONIGHT
Although the American public
would probably hasten to brand any
speaker on such a subject as "What
a Reporter Saw at the Peace Con-
ference" as a politiclan, William Al-
len White, who will .lecture at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium on
.his topic, is decidedly not of this
class.
He has interested himself in re-
form movements,.both national ahd in
his own state, and is declared by
Prof. H. E. Riggs of the engineering
college, a close friend of his, to be
"absolutely fearless and utterly re-
gardless of whose feelings are hurt
when he starts out to reform some-
thing."
While in Ann Arbor Mr. White will
be entertained by Professors H. E.
;Riggs and T.-E. Rankin. Tonight 1e
will be guest of honor and speaker
at the banquet of the National As-:
sociation of Teachers of Journalism
to be held at the Union. Immediately
'following the lecture he will give a'
short talk to Kansas students in Hill
auditorium.
SUGGESTS NEW MEMORIL
PROFESSOR LORCH THINKS GATE
SUITABLE MONUMENT; SPIRITS
APPROVE PLANS .
The communication in The Michigan
Daily in regard to the proposed me-
morial flag staff is most timely. How-
ever, the value of a memorial is not
dependent upon its size, but rather
upon its having such a character as
o make it really significant. It
Would be possible to erect a flag staff
with a bronze base that would be ap-
propiate in every way. Such flag
staffs are to be found in Venice, in
front of the Cathedral of St. Mark,
and In this cuntry there are two in
connection with the main library of
Columbia university, each being a
class memorial.
It would of course be necessary to
secure a good design and a first-class
sculptor to do the modeling. Under
such conditions, Michigan might eas-
ily have a flag staff which would in
every way form a beautiful and worthy
memorial. '
The writer' to The Daily suggests
a gate as a memorial. Such a gate
could be'made most attractive, partic-
ularly if it were considered as part
of a general campus scheme, as has
been done in' other places.
Emil Lorch.
Editor, The Michigan Daily-- -
Having been caused some anxiety
and apprehension in noticing the com-
munication sent from the spiritworld
yesterday regarding the flag pole to
be erected in honor of the soldier
dead, I immediately got in touch with
one of my mediums to authenticate
the communication.
Upon inquiry as to the true situa-'
ition, I find that there is hardly any
excitement or stir about the matter-
in fact none--any more than about the
League of Nations or heartbroken
humanity, neither of which they heard
anything about, until they got there.
When asked about their views on the
subject, they invariably replied that

it was- the old Michigan spirit, that
could push such a campaign across in
two or three days' time among the
student body, and they sent their
congratulations to, the committee in.
charge.
Sincerely, .
Arhur Conan Doyle 2nd.
(For the Society of Psychical Re-
search.)

RUSSIANS ADVANCE;'
BOLSHEVIK MUTINY
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
London, Oct. 16. - General Yude-
nitch, commander of the Russian
Northwestern army, has captured
G~tchna'and is victoriously advanc-
ing towards Krasneye Selo and
Tsarskeye Selo, 18 and 15 miles from
Petrograd.
Reports from Reval and Helsing-
fors say that the forces are meeting
with feeble resistance although Gat-
nicha was strongly fortified. Re-
ports from aviators show that 'the
few barricades are on the -road to
Petrograd and trenches and entangle-
ments outside of the capital are not
formidable.

ALL UN1YER
WILL 1E
IN CONY(

President Hutchins C
fair as One of 1
Better Trad

It was
Bolshevik
owing to
troops.

also apnounced that the
are. evacuating Petrograd
a mutiny among the Red

NEDL DENBY 1TOaPRESIDE
AT BARBECUE TONIGHT
Major Ned Denby, probable nomi-
nee for governor of the state, will
act as master of ceremonies at the'
great barbecue given by the Univer
sity club of Ddtroit tonight at the
Elks' temple in that city.
Enlisting as .a private iin the U. S.
Marines at the outbreak of the war,
Mr. Denby was sent to France and
soon rose to the rank of major. He
is therefore well qualified to address
the vast throng of students and alum-
ni who will gather in the Elks' tenm
ple for the greatest all-Michigan
meeting In history-
Murfin to Speak
Among the other speakers of the
evening are Major Frank D. Eames
and the Hon. James O. Murfin. The
alumni reception committee has made
ample preparation for the great
number pf Michigan students who will
be present In. respose to earnest i~-
vitation of the old graduates.
Today is the last chance' to get tick-
ets for the barbecue. They may be
obtained from Carl Johnson, '20, or
James McClintock, '21L.
NOMINEES CHOSEN
BV '21 ENGINEERS
Junior engineer nominations Thurs-
day afternoon resulted in the naming
of four men for each class office. The
support shown is indicative of a close-
ly contested election.
Those nominated were: President
W. H. Blodgett, R. Grindley, M. E.
McGowan, and R. D. Smith; vice-
president, F. R. Beutel, L. .A. Gains,,
E. M. Stevens, E. W. Vietes; secretary,
C. W. Auer, J. M. Miller, J. W. Ken-
nedy, B. D. Wheeler; treasurer, H. G.
McNamee, H. Sherman, F. R. Storer,
C. Q. Wetzel.
CANADIAN DEGREE
TO- PROF. WENL EY
Prof. R. M. Wenley was honored by
having the degree of doctor of laws
conferred upon him by Queen's uni-.
versity, Kingston, Ontario, while at-
tending a special Convocation held for
the inaugurations of the chancellor
and president.1
Profesor Wenley spoke later at the
inauguration banquet as the selected
representative of the universities cf
the United States.
SOPH LITS CHOOSE
CLASS OFFICERS
'The sophoniore literary class elect-
ed the following class officers Thurs-
day: President, Charles Eades; vice-
president, Caroline Napier; secretary,
Charles Murchison; and treasurer,
George F. Stone. Voting was light,
only 150 ballots being cast during the
time alloted for elections.

ASSEMBLY Pol
Faculties-University
Graduate sch'ool, Coll
umnae and Nurses-
north wing of Unive:
Seniors-Driveway bet
ence and Law build
Juniors-Driveway bet
ence and Chemistry
Sophomores-Thayer
of North University
Freshmen-Pavement
Uniwersity Ave.
Michigan Editors-- T
entrance to Hill au

I

SCHOOL WORK SUSPE
O'CLOCK; STUDENTS
SEMBLE BY CLAS

ky ?

IN CASEt
Students will
to Hill auditor
freshmen -will ta
I main floor. Fre
1 cupy the first a
i conies. Michigar
Ihave seats in the

OF

prc
ium
ke i
shn
nd
e fir

DEAN EFF
SPEAKE

cept a mai
hereof an4
position o
Press) '
antung tr
ns swung
s while
th those
)f the six
ublicans
favor of
'epublican
osing it.
date

R OF

Members of the Univ
students and faculty m
expected, to attend Conv
o'clock Friday afterno:
auditorium.
That the 5,000 seats i
torium will all be occupi
program begins is the w
ident Hutchins. In speal
day of Convocation, he
that this year's event is t
nual affair of its kind, an
become one of Michigan',
ditions. He again empha
Convocation alone of all.
ing t e college year, the
versity meets as one.
The program as an
Thursday's Daily will be
J. R. Effinger being the sp
day. Less than an hour
quired for the exercis
weather is not inclement
bly of classes and march
torium will take place,
Varsity band. Otherwise
bly will be dispensed wi
dents will proceed direct
torium.
To Snsend Aeth
Uni'vrsity work of al'
be susv,-ded at 3. o'clock
dents r. faculty mein
time to assemble for
Tire Varsity band will:
center of the campus at 3
the first music will be t
prepare for assembly.
Fac-lly to 'Wear I
The Presidtnt, Regents,
members will wear acad
°,r the occasion. Gradu
are not expected to do s
Students 'holding degre
er schools, but not regis
graduate school here, wil
the seniors. All student
this is the fourth year
pus will also be in the s
Regent Hubbard Here for
Rej'ent L. L. Hubbard c
is/n the city to attend
and to attend the meeting
of Regents, Friday,

:sen- I
were
the
iand

Round-Up Club Holds First Meeting
The first meeting of the year was
held by the Round-Up club in the Un-
ion Wednesday night when plans for
an active year were discussed. A num-
ber of formal and informal dances'
were arranged for the coming months.

c -hcame at the
,nd a half hours
ality swept away
ead of one, each
text having been
by the committee
ike out the word
tute the word
the sections re-
.ce of Shantung.
nt, however, the
ated and voted on

'1

BOARD WARNS ATHLETES
Attention of the student body
is directed to the fact that our
rules forbid any student during
term time taking part in any
athletic contest except as a mem-
ber of an authorized University
team.
Violations of this rule will re-
sult in the offenders being inelig-
ible for Varsity competition.
RALPH W. AIGLER, Chairman,
Board in Control of Athletics.

f 384 stu-I
, two new
ed to this
k M. Blan-
hatcher.

a Reporter Saw at The Peace Conferenc

WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE Hill Auditorium

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