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May 18, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND N
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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 18, "1920.

FREE MOVIES ON
CAP NIGHT BILL
In accordance with arrangements
made by the committee in charge -ot
the Cap Night ceremonies, the doors
of the leading Ann Arbor picture hous-
es will be opened to the entire student
body following the closing of formal-
ities at Sleepy Hollow.
. Immediately after the, last address,
the freshmen will fall in to the rear of
the '23 band and snake dance' back
to town, where they will proceed to
Y the show of their choice. Members
of the other classes will break ranks
at Sleepy Hollow.
The Majestic, Arcade, Orpheum, and
e; Wuerth theaters have agreed to give
free entertainment, and the managers
are making every effort to obtain the
best possible films for the occasion.

IStage

Set F'or Festival. Artists;
First ConcertWednesday Night

(Edna Lucking Apel)
All necessary reliminary plans
have been complered and it is only
necessary for the'artists, the Chicago
Symphony erchestra, the University
choral union, and the usual vast audi-
ence to assemble in order to launch
the 1920 May festival on a series of
six brilliant programs beginning at 8
o'clock Wednesday evening and con-
tinuing through until Saturday even-
ing in Hill auditorium.,
The Choral runion will hold two fir-
al rehearsals of the "Requiem" and
"The Damnation of Faust" with, the
orchestra on Wednesday afternoon and.
Friday morning. There are 300 voices
in the urion, and, owing to the large
number of applicants, the management
has been able to select the singers
with more care than in the past few
festivals. The ensemble as a whole
should-be of excellent caliber.
Arrival of Symphony
The Chicago Symphodny orchestra
will arrive in special cars Wednesday
BLANKET TRSEEATO_
ATHLETIC BOARD ENABLE TO SE'.
SURE SUITABLE
MATERIAL

1, i

morning from Chicago and will be
busily engaged with rehearsal~sof the
soloists and the choruses.
500 in Children's Chorus
The children's chorus, which ap-
pears in the Friday afternoon concert,
numbers 500 voices. Miss Lulu Allen
has trained the chorus in groups in the
grade schools and Mr. Russell Carter
is now conducting -mass rehearsals
with the children.'
The official program, containing
about 100 pages of analytical Aotes-on
the several programs and half-tone
portraits of the participating artists,
has come *om the press and is being
distributed.
Changes in Auditorium
The Hill auditorium's platform has
undergone some significant changes in
order to accommodate the 70 members
of the orchestra, the- 300 singers of
the Choral union, and the 500 children
in the Children's chorus. It has been
built out over four rows of seats and
is held up by heavy steel supports.
The entire stage has been raised' 18
inches and four rows in the audience
have- also been raised.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
classes and lessons will be omitted at
the University School. of Music, and
Knstead, each student Vill be given an
opportunity to attend the oth'erwise;
private rehearsals of the "Requiem"
and "The Damnation of Faust."

SHAW TO ADDRESS
'20 LITSTHURSDAY
Mr. Wilfred B., Shaw, secretary of
the Alumni association, will talk to
the members of the senior literary
class at a m~eeting at 4 o'clock Thurs-
day afternoon in room 101 of the Eco-
nomics building.
Mr. Qhaw will explain the position
and duties of the class when it joins
the ranks of Michigan alumni. Wil-
tgm Hinshaw, president of the class,
particularly requests every member to
be present at this meeting.
PLUMB SAS PLAN NOT
AUTHOR OF RAILROAD IMPROVE-'
M.ENT SCHEME ADDRESSES
CAPACITY AUDIENCE

Inter-
ok its
g the

Rain Stops Iowa
Diamond Contest

PRICE THREE CENTi
SI MS TRHiNG TO
PRUISIANIZE NAYY
CHARGES DANIEL.S
SECRETARY CLAIMS ADMIRAL
AIMING AT MILITARY
CONTROL
HOSTILITY SHOWN IN
OFFICER'S TESTIMONY
Cabinet Member Ready to Take Gen
eral Staff Issue to Country, If
Congress Desires
(BytAssociated Press)
Washington, May 17. -- Desir6'"to
Prussianize the navy department" wa
ascribed by Secretary Daniels today
as one of Rear Admiral Sims' under
lying motives in criticising the de
partment's conduct of the war. Th
secretary, testifying before the Senat
Investigating committee, also charge
that most of the testimony supporting
Admiral Sims' position was from offi
cers who wished to remove civilian
control of the navy department and
make the secretary a "rubber stamp.
Charge Shows Hostility
"The original charge showed hostil
ity to certain officers and a desire t
damage the ranking officers who di
rected th'e operations during the war,
aid Mr. Daniels. "And the evidenc
has disclosed a desire to misrepreset
the secretary of the navy because hE
was not a rubber stamp secretary.
"But deeper than egotism and preju"
dice you will find a deep seated deter
mination to organize the navy depAri
ment upon the approved Prussian plat
of giving all power to the militar
and taking all away from the clvi
lian."

.rging BULLETINS
vern- Iowa City, Ia., May 17. - The
while Michigan-16wa game here today
ectors was called off on account of wet
data grounds, heavy rains early in the
itical day and Sunday so completely
soaking the diamond that play
was impossible. The Michigan
ed in- team left Monday night for Chi-
siffur- cago, from where they will leave
fifht immediately' for Ann Arbor..

of

Columbus, 0., May 17.,- In at
ninth inning rally Ohio State Uni-
va~ity ,lf.C , nli ia hkr 4n

Glenn k. Plumb, whose plan for the
solution of the railroad question has
been adoptet by the American federal
tion of labor, spoke to a capacity audi-
ence in the Natural Sciegce auditorium
last evening. His address -emphasiz-
ed the principles underlying his plan
rather thanthe details of its applica-
tion.
Mr. Plumb presented his plan, which
he says, "is not a remedy, but a diag-
nosis. of the disease condition of ~our
railroads," in an earnest appeal to the
men whom he believed will direct the
country in the coming generation. -
the college students: His plan is found-
ed on the belief that the railroads
came into being through the need of
the public, the capit~ists who under-
took to fill this need, and the labor
which produced theme His plan is an
attempt to give these three equal rep-
resentation and shares in the profits.
Members of the faculty of the eco-
nomics and sociology departments en-
tertained Mr. Plumb at a dinner at
the Union before tpe address. Many
of his hearers remained after the lec-

Tersit y eeaed iys nere o-
day 6 to 5.
from Entrenched firmly in first place as
tance a result of five Conference victories,
com- the ,Michigan nine will return homel
rmin- to face Ohio State Wednesday in one
with of the crucial games of the season,
how- the Bucleye school boasting a strong
rt of aggregation. The calling off of the
re- Iowa game gives the Wolverines only
r and one chance to win over the Hawkeyes,
ike a and this opportunity comes Saturday
;ation with a. contest on Ferry field.
Victory over Iowa at this time will
g the eliminate Iowa from Conference run-
nmis- ning, and leave only Illinois as a se-
local rious obstacle in the Wolverines' way.
rough Whom Lundgren will start in the
ected Ohio state game is a question, for the
gen- cancelling of, the Iowa game leaves
.t by Parks fresh, and Rizicika and Scheid-
can ler will also be ready for a turn in
rush- the boxy Although Parks could tun-
aiting doubtedly stand the test of both the
Ohio State and Iowa games, it is prob-
able that he will be kept in reserve for
y de- the Ohio game, and kept out for the-
'epre- important Iowa contest Saturday.
ppers
, and HURLEY ASKED TO
r the SPEAK AT PURDUE

stat-
talk

George Hurley, '18L, general secre-
tary of the Michigan Union, has re-
ceived ,an invitation to be the prine-
pal speaker at the convocation exer-
cises to be held at Purdue univfrsity
Thursday. It was asked that he stress
_ the importance of eampus activitis in
his address, and bring to the tudents
of Purdue some idea of the wly these
activities are carried on at the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
- It is as yet uncertain' as to whether
. or not it will be possible for him to
accept, on account of previous busi-
ness engagements.

Blanket presentation ceremonies,
scheduled. for this coming Saturday,
have been cancelled because of th in-
ability of the committee in charge to
secure'blankets jf the right size and
high quality' desi d.
The plan as authorized by the board
in control of athletics included the
presentation of a blanket to every
graduating athlete who had won two
or more "M's" while in school. The
blankets were to bear an "M" for every
form , of athletics in which the man
Id won an "'M" and also a star under'
these "M's" for each one receivgd in
-that spdrt
-Traditional Ceremony
The Student council had planned to
present these blankets from the steps
e ;the Liblary with fitting ceremo-
nies and to make the presentation of
blankets a traditional ceremony. .
Athletic Board's Decision
. The athletic board has tried through-
out the country to secure blankets of
the necessary quality, but, upon dis-
covering that none better than . army
blankets could be obtained, decided
that it would be better to wait until
-the right kind ofjblankets were avail-
able. In case they can be secured
this summer, they will be sent to the
min who are to receive them.-
Reports from other schools, which
follow this custom, show that they
have experienced the same difficulty in
obtaining blankets.
Welsh Choristers
Receive Applause
(L. H.)
'Large appreciative audiences, in-
sistent applause for encores, artists
whose talent and ability have won for
them fame in their own country and
in America - these facts attest to the
successful concerts of the Famous
Mountain Ash Welsh Choir, which ap-
peared at the Congregational church
Sunday afternoon, and again at the
Presbyterian church that evening.
The soloists of the choir were es-
pecially well received. John Williams,
second bass, scored a decided success
with his remarkable interpretation,
his best offering being "I Fear No
Foe." D. Penj.r Williams, basso; sing-
ing "The Trumpeter," was well ap-
plauded, as were also M. J. Edwards,
tenor, who has been awarded 300 priz-
es for his meritorous work, and'Ben
Davies, noted Welsh elocutionist.
Prof. T. Glyndwr Richards deserves
special mention-for his able leadership
of the concert.' The solo offerings as
well as accompaniment of Prof. 'W.
Evans, pianist, also are to be com-
mended.
STEFFENS POLITICAL SCIENCE
CLASS WILL MEET THURSDAY
Mr. Steffens' class in political sci-
ence 12 will meet at the regular hours,,
2 o'clock Thursday afternoon of this
week'ind again in the evening at 7:15
o'clock.

PROMOTERS OF LESION-
POST GRINTMRA TM
EX-SERVICE YMEN MAY HAND IN1
NAMES UNTIL THURSDAY
NOOK '
' In order that all. ex-service men may
have an opportunity of signifying their
intentios of' joining .the propos'ed1
z ampus post of the American Legion,
the time for handing in of names to
the committee in charge has been ad-
vanced to Thursday noon.
This action, was taken because of
the fact that only a few .names were
reported yesterday. It is the desire of
the committee that men respond with
more promptnesS, so that ,the gQst may
be established and officers elected be-
fore the end of the semester. Members
of posts in their home towns are urged
not, to hesitate about transferring, as7
a rule of the national organization
provides for changes from one post to
another..f
All men who were in the army,
navy, or marine corps from' April 6,
1917, to Nov. 11, 1918, are asked to fill
out the coupon printed below, and de-
posit it in the box which the commit-
tee has placed in the main lobby of
the Union. ,
Member.........(Yes or No).
Name...-..... .........
Unit..--......--. .......
Post'............. .....
City .................-....
Service,...
CHINESE STUDENT DIES, OF
RIDING ACCIDENT INJURIES
M. K. Foo, '21, of Fukip, Chin, flied
at 12 o'clock Sunday ii the Burreti.
private hospital, 415 South Fifth ave-
nue, as the result of injuries sustained
while horseback riding Saturday, May,
8. He suffpred a cut forehead land-
knee. Foo was given medical atten-
tion at the, University hospital, but
was transferred to the private hospital
Friday when his injuries took a turn
for the worse.
Foo's brother at the Univerity of
California was notified, -and he left for
Ann Arbor yesterday afternoon. The
father of the dead student is living
in Penang, Straits Settlements.
Announce Women Grads Engagemets
Announcement has been made of the
engagement of Gladys M. Strickland,
'21, of BattleTreek, to Charles Blair
Coursen, of Milwaukee. Mr. Coursen
is now a senior at the Universtiy of
Chicago.
Word has been received of the an-
nouncement of the engagement of
Vernice J. Garvin, 1, of Huntington,
W. Va., to Hartford McMunlin, of On-
tonagon, Mich. Miss Garvin was a
member of Alpiawhi Omega' sorority
Mr. McMullin is. a graduate of Mar-
quette univ.ersity.

ture to'question Mr. Plumb oa
ous phases of his plan.

hould

UNION SEEKING,
ROOMS FOR GRADS
Sinice the last of the Union bedrooms
have been engaged by al'umni life
members for occupation during the
May festival and during Commence-
mynt week, the Uhion has been locat-
ing rooms outside for these alumni
members.
Persons havinj available rooms area
asked to communicate with ,R. , E.
Swart , '22E, care of the Union, list-
ing rooms according to capacity, loca-
tion, price, and other - details.

admiral secretary' and
cabinet and civilians i'
post, but should not pi
control of the'navy
civilian secretary as
and rubber stamp sec

'

etty thor-
Lose two
-+a .

LENS ADMITS
6 FRESH MEDICS

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lws

X11

Six tiew members were taken into
Galens, honorary upperclass medical
society, at the recent spring election.
't Those chosen are: J. L. Loomis, '22M,
ed H. Taylor, '22M, J. A. Smith, '22M, L.
ch M. Wieder, '22M, A. G. Goetz, '22M, and
ck E. B. McKinley, '22M.

SIX ELECTED TO
MEDICAL SOCIETYt
Elections for membership in Alphaf
Omega Alpha were held last night and
the . following junior medics were se-
lected for admission into the uipper-,
class medical honorary society:]
S. W. Becker, J. F. Gipner, C. J.
Marinus, Margaret Reynolt,, and F.
L. R. Snyder.
NINE FRATERNITY TENNIS
MATCHES MUST BE RUN OFF
Weather permitting, the following
games inthe fraternity tenis tourney
must be reported by lVedne ay night:
Delta Theta Phi vs. Delta Kappa Ep-
silon, Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Alpha Sig-
ma Phi;. Trigon vs. Beta, Theta Pi,
Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. Delta Upsilon,,
Nu Sigma Nu vs. Phi Rho Sigma,
Hermitage vs. Delta Chi, Delta Tau
Delta vs. Psi Upsilon, Theta Chi: vs.
Zeta Psi, and Phi Sigma Kappa vs.
Theta Delta Chi.
With the exception of the last three
games all of these. are in the first
round of play and these will finish all
games in that round. It' is especially
important that all the first round
games be played off *%fore ;Wednes-
day, on Tuesday in as many cases as
possible.
SOPH VIGILANCE COMMITTEE
WILL MEET AT UNION TONIGHT
All members of the sophomore'vigi-
lance committee are urged to attend
the' organization's last meeting which
will be held at 7:15 o'clock tonight in
the Union. Important matters relative
to Cap night will be discussed and the
committee will outline its. course of
action.

California Team
Leaves For Lai
San Francisco, Cal., May 17.-F
athletes from the University of Ca
fornia and the coach left here tod
for Philadelphia, where-they will cc
pete in the .Eastern Intercoliegi
track meet on May 28 and 29.
They are also entered in the We
ern Conference meet at Ann Arn
June 4 and 5. The members of t
California team are J. W. Mercha
considered the bet' all around a
lete on thae. coast, Majors, Peters
field men; A. Sprott, and 0. Hendr
on quarter mile.
COLLEGE MEN WANTED TO '
TRY OUT AS.,OVIE 4CTOJ
College men are to be given an
portunity to try out with the D.
Griffiths' motion picture studio,
cording to a letter just received
The Daily. Dark eyes, photograj
features, and tall stature hre the o
necessary qualifications.
In reference to the work, Mr. G
fiths says: "As the newest of
great -ndust-ies, motion pictures
quires the most trained minds av
;.ble. This profession offers the
'nost rewards in proportion to o
ability.' Many young men, after a
mnnths training, receive higher s
aries than executives in lines req
ing long preparation. Success con
to the students and the worker."
Aspiring actors are asked to e
their phitographs and write to
Lloyd, Orienta Point, Mamoroneck
Y.
SENIOR LITS, NOTICE
Senior lit invitations and an
nouncements have- arrived and
will be given out from 2 to
o'clock today in the corridor o
Uniyersity hall.

room 231 Nat-
as been chang-
evening. Ster-
camp will be

Five more men from the. present
freshman medic class will be chosen
next fall.
MAYOR WURSTER TO ATTEMPT
TO GET COAL FOR MICHIGAN

Ti

O~NIGHT a.Mayor Ernst. M. Wurster will attend
a. conference in Washington, Wednes-
g of the day in an effort to get coal started to-
ward Michigan. Mayors of Michigan'
evening, cities will attend the meeting which
d at 7 :15 will be in.the form of a conference be-
ins chos- tween the city executives and the Un-
pus elec- ited States chamber of commerce.
at this While in Washington -Mayor Wurst-
er will also see the Michigan con-
gressmen to enlist their aid in this

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