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May 16, 1920 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GARY

:Ll 43

:i rit t

TWO

q

L

ANN AhtBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 16, 1920

PRICE THREE

Class

o ,f

Classes

Reaidy

to

G radua-

I-,

When They Donned Their Caps and Gowns For First Time

SENIORS OF 1920 END HISTORICAL
EPOCH; DISTINGUISHE EBY BEING LAS
CLASS UNDER PRESIDENT HUTH

r. .. ..--.

1

SENIORS
(By J. W. K.)

Seniors, the gate of Life
opened,
The world 'awaits to put
test

is
to

the!
any
rd of

Each man of you, for of the na-
tion
You are counted as the best.
'Tis Tomorrow you have trained
for,
For the trial that you must
bear;
You must carry on the Nation,
You must tend her every care.
Seniors, yours a work of honor,
Yours a task above the mass;
You are fitted-yours the harder
Test than all that you must'
pass.
Make Tomorrow's record greater'
Than of those who went be-
fore,
For the students of Tomorrow
Soon will try to reach your
score.
You are worthy, you can con-
quer,
You can fill Life's every need.
Michigan is waiting, watching-
Wishing each of you God-
speed!

two

I

LE AVING UNIVERSITY TOGET]
WITH THE RETIRING
HEAD
SHEEPSKINS WILL BE
GIVEN TO THOUSAN
"Twenty" Has Lived Through '
Witnessing Great Campus Prog
ress Despite Conflict
(By Jack Dakin)
The class of 1920 and Presi
Harry B. Hutchins are graduating
gether from the University.
Both mark the close of an histo
epoch-the beginning of a new.
years to come it is very probable
the names of this class and Presd
Hutchins will often be linked toget
for both have weathered the stc
period of war, and now many 1
with a sense of work well done.
What is doubtless the most unu
thing about 1920 is the fact that
probably the most broken up c
that ever stepped up for its si
skins. Just when its members
getting ready 'in the spring of 191
discard their toques, Wilhelm of
many told his submarine comman
to go the limit; the United States
dared war, and college seemed to
its attraction. So, when hosti:
subsided, 1920 found itself lar
made up of divers old ex-'l8ers
'19ers, as well as its original r
bers.
Personnel Changes
So the class that graduates
June is not identically the same
entered in the fall of 1916. Son
its members never returned to co
because they gave their lives in
country's cause. Numerous o
who did return lost a year or s
credit and dropped back to a 1
class.
This is the last class that can r
look back to and discuss with in
ity the "good old days" before the
and prohibition, when old St. Jol
Barleycorn reigned supreme in
vicinity of Main street.
But aside from such things,
have seen great changes and i
ments in the University. The
pletion of the Union, the erecti'
the Library, and other material
versity improvements have taken
during their four years. And
have had opportunity to feel th
ginning of the University's part i
work of reconstruction.
Well Balanced Class
This year's seniors are on the'
a well balanced class. Not onl
they good scholars, but are acti
well. The return of the colle

I

1 the
him-
uni-

11

as elect-
e senior
. an al-

lits

ng his
narrow

OMEN GRADATES, MAKE
HIGH CAMPUS RECORS

LASTIC AND CAMPUS
ORS BRING FORTH
CELEBRITIES

HON.

MOrs
?at) Hogan.
s at present

two other
- big cam-
rear. His
tent as it
se of the
aged in.
n consult-'
Nhich have

pus does not know
t and Carl Johnson
1 largely responsible
its as the retention
-they made this pos-
sota game-and the
es. Quite incident-
Harry is known as
e Daily, for it is he
as.
Phi Beta Kappa
rl Johnson-he too
ong the real person-
enior -class. Track
y, president of his
year, and now pres-
ent council,-this is
Carls collegiate rec-
however, ,he has just
'hi Beta Kappa, an

By Frances Oberholtzer
Michigan's graduating class for
1920 will take with it 291 of the fair"
sex, from which number many women'
of note on the campus and of high
scholastic attainments may be taken.
Campus offices have been well filled
by representatives of this class,
twenty-two made Phi Beta Kappa,
and the "tout ensemble"' are repre-
sentative of the spirit and ability of
Michigan women.
While each has, in her field, made
a place for herself in campus life and
will leave a vacancy in the groups
of which she is a member, there are
some particularly representative
women whose "lives and works"
speak for their influence and popu-
larity among the students.
There is Marguerite Chapin, who
has ably filled the office of President
of the Woman's League, and in this
connection visited many universities
and junior colleges throughout the
country, organizing W. S. G. A. and
inspiring the desire for higher educa-
tion in the hearts of young women
wherever she has gone. Beside this
large and time-taking activity, she
(Continued on page 4)

1. The band as it appeared prepar-
atory to the entrance of the seniors
into Hill Auditorium, during Swing
Out ceremonies.
2. A group of seniors from the Col-
lege of Literature, Science and Arts.
awatiing the signal to "fall in" for the I
procession. They assembled in front
of the Library.
3. Following the triumph of the
Laws over the Engineers, the i comingj
lawyers gathered to the southeast of I
the arch, around a machine which had
aided in theri triumph.
4. Women of the College of Litera-
ture, Science and 'Arts entering Hill
Auditoruim. The line, made up of the
men of the remainder of the college,
may be seen continuing. around the
Natural Science building.
5. The tilt between the Laws and
the Engineers, as viewed rom the
northwest side of the arch. .
6. Senior Literary students await-
ing their turn to enter Hill Audito-t
rium.
UNIVERSE, HIS WORKHOUSE
D. J. Hillier, '20P, Accepts Position,
Will Travel Over Entire World
By H. W. Vahlteichl
A most, unusual position - one in
which the "world will be his kingdom"
-has befallen the lot of D. J. Hillier,
'20P, who has been selected from the
senior pharmacy class to accept a po-
sition with the Sidney Ross Co. of

Photo by Lyndon
TRCK TEAM NIT HARD
SEVEN CINDER PATH MEN END ,
COLLEGE CAREERS; OTHER,
. ATHLETES LEAVE
(J. E. AcManis),
Among the most notable contribu-
tions of the 1920 Senior class to the
University of Michigan has been that,
in the field of athletics./ Many of the
most famed names on Michigan Var-
sity teams will be found enrolled in
this class.'
The most serious blow at Michigan
athletics by graduation will be in
track, where no less than seven con-
sistent point' winners will be lost.
Captain Johnson, Cook, Cross, and Ba-
ker, all Conference and Eastern In-
tercollegiate point winners are in the
senior class. Messner, Beardsley, and
Later, valuable ,men who have more
than once demonstrated the right to
the "M" they wear, will also sever
connections with the university.,
Johnson, Cross and Baker are all,
or have been at one time, Conference
champions. Johnson holds the west-
.ern record in the running broad jump,
made in 1918, and in this same year
Cross was Big Ten pole vault cham-
pion, and Baker held the same honor
i nthe shot put. Beardsley's great
.running in the two hurdle events, par-

Jiany Classes
Represented 21y
Law Graduates'
(By Thomas E. Dewey)
Graduating with the greatest num-
ber of different classes represented for
years, and with more than 75 per cent
of its members ex-service men, the
-1920 Law class, composed of 87 men,
is exceptional in many ways. .
The class is essentially military. Of
the 75 per cent of the men who were
in the service, figures show that more
than three-quarters of them held com-
missions ranking from captain in the
army and lieutenant in the navy. The
average age of the men is considerably
older than in ordinary years, and there
are six different classes of the Law
school represented among the ranks
of the seniors, mostly due, of course,
to the war.
Unusual Personnel
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school says of the class:
"The men of this class are, probably
on account of the war, unusually ma-
ture, and have displayed unusual in-
terest in their work and earnestness
in study. Mature judgment in dealing
with campus and Law school pioblema
has been a prominent characteristic
of the men, and as a' class they have
shown an exceptionally fine spirit al
through. I feel a sincere regard foi
the men of this year and expect them
to domuch after they leave the school
"An unusually large number havE
already secured positions this year
and most of them with leading lav.
firms. This 'is due to two things,7
believe. First, there is a .greater de
mand for men skilled in the law tha]
ever before. Second, I believe muc
of this increase to be due to the grow
(Continued on page 2) -

v
Y
S
-'
C'
0
T
C2
s.
e
r,
I
n
h
-_

normal conditions is evidenced in
better way than by the fact that
men outnumbered the women b
considerable majority in the re
Phi Beta Kappa elections.
According to the Secretary's o
1,057 seniors will receive their i
mas this June. Approximately 74
this number are lits. These fig
include every school and college
do not, of course, include Febri
graduates. This is another evd:
of the return to normal condition
Like many, others, the class of
may have had greatness thrust
it by force of circumstances alone
no member of the class will admi
Like everyone else in the world,
prefer to believe that the class
born great, or rather was a
freshman class. The class tha
graduating is one that has
(Continued on' page 4)

New York city, a large pharmaceutical ( ticularly against Cornell and Illinois
(Continued on page 4) (Continued on page 4)

)MPLETE LINE

OF

A

F aend TENNIS AT
GO DS

Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

TWO STORES

TWO STORES

i

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