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May 14, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1920.

rn

May 13.-Michigan
matches from the
1. Boyden of the
Wesbrook a hard
Wolverine captain
s from two sets,
6-4. Reindel com-
Newey by a count
fell prey to Munz,
while Angell easily
6-1. Both sets of
by Michigan.
IAND ' TO
TED TONIGHT
HEARSAL PAVES
OPENING
MHT
ress rehearsal is an
ll-presented public
na's Husband," the
ssical club will pre'-
:k tonight in Sarah
11, will fulfill all
it, according to the
the club.-
tween Helena, the
man of mythology,
g of Sparta, is full
which in fact char-
e play, and the
heroine with Paris,

"QUIN" RYAN, OF
CHICAGOTRIBUNE
TO LECTURE HERE
ADDRESS WILL BE GIVEN MAY 25
IN NATURAL SCIENCE'
AUDITORIUM

NOTED WRITER
BY PI DELTA/

BOOKED
EPSILON

Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions Lends Financial
Assistance
"Quin" RSt, poet, critic, and sports
writer on the staff of the Chicago
Tribune, has been secured to deliver
a lecture Tuesday evening, May 25,
in the Natural Science auditoriuin. An
announcement to this effect was is-
sued yesterday by Pi Delta Epsilon,
national honorary journalistic fra.
ternity, under whose auspices Ire is
to speak.
Mr. Ryan is now on a Chatauqua
tour and a number of universities
throughout the Middle West have
booked him for lectures. His address
in Ann Arbor will concern the vari-
ous phases of newspaper work and
will be illustrated with slides t'aken
in and around the plant of the Chicago
Tribune.
In recognition of the importance
of Mr. Ryan's lecture to all students
interested in newspaper work, the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions is aiding in the finan ng of the
lecture. All members of the publica-
tions staffs will be admited upon pre-
sentation of passes which may be se-
cured from the cashier at the publi-
cations office. Tickets will be placed'
on sale next week at several of the
campus stores, where they can be ob-
tained for 35 cents.
CALL FRFAMHANDS
SENT OUT BY MEREDITH*
PRESIDENT RECEIVES LETTER
ASKING FOR AID FROM
STUDENTS

Masques Produce
Decided Success
(By Jay .Bee)
Perfection-that can be attained only
by use of talent mariked the final per-
formance of Masques 1920 production,
"The New Lady Bantock," last night
at Sarah CasvWell Angell hall. The
play can be characterzed by only one
word-delightful.
Emotion, near tragedy and finally
humor, presented by a cast that was
truly remarkable when one considers
that only women took part in the pro-
duction, carried "The New Lady Ban-'
tock" into history as a success.
Madeleine Hazelton, '20, as Lady
Bantock, proved conclusively that her
ability is worthy of the professional
stage where she is said tohave first
gained her experience as an actress..
There was little more that could have
been asked of her work.
So it was with the entire cast. Mar-
ion Ames as Bennet, the butler,(Eliz-]
abeth Vickery as Lord Bantock, and
Helen Cady as George Newte, are only
a few who helped make the play a]
success. Frances Stevens and Mil-
dred Sherman were indeed realistic in'
their portrayal of Lord Banitock's
aunts.,
From the heroine down to each of
the members of the "Our Empire"
musical comedy company, there can
be little else than commendation.
Masques produced a decided hit.
INSTRUCTORS MEET TO1
DISCUSS SITU0ATiO0N1
FUTURE CHANCES HERE AND
OTHER EMPLOYMENT
TALKED OVER

UNDE$CLASSMEN EXCUSED
All underclassmen are excus-
ed at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon,
that they may partake in the
Spring games. There will be no
classes for freshmen and soph-
omores Saturday morning.
JOHN R. EFFINGER,
MORTIMER E. COOLEY,
EMIL LORCH.
FINAL IOTE ,TO-TAL
-31880 IN ELECTION.

CLASS
FOR;

FOR OPENING BATTLE OF A
-SPRING GAMES; TUG-OfW

PARTICIPANTI
:3:15 A]

Completed Tally Shows This
Ballot Heaviest Ever
Polled

OF '221
FRAY I

Year's

by

an isI

s to set

a dance will be
3f the hall. Mu-
by Rhodes' or-
ay from 9 to 1

Is are on sale at Graham's
>re and in the corridor of Uni-
hall. Prices are $1.25 per cou-
play and dance, and 35 ,cents
play alone.

WIRE

BRIEFS

ociated Press)
May 13.-President
ico is surrounded and
raits at Rinconada,
in the state of Puebla,
telegram from Gen.
received tonighteat
adquarters here.

uctions have
auza to leave
eneral Obre-

Laredo, Tex., May 13. - Whistles
were blown and bells rung at the
celebration in Nuedo, Laredo, this aft-
ernoon on receipt today of a telegram
stating that revolutionary forces un-
der Porfirio Gonzales had occupied
Monterey. The source of the message
is not known here nor has the cap-
ture of Monterey by rebels been con-
firmed' across the border. The wire
declared Carranza forces retired with-
out firing a shot, at 10 o'clock last
night.
Washington, May 13. - General Pa-
laez, who has been in de facto control
of the old fields about Tampica, ar-
rived in Tampico today and was cor-
dially received, according to a radio-
gram to the navy department from
Captain Long aboard the destroyer
Putnam at that point.
General Palaez's attitude t owards
the revolutionary movement had been
in doubt heretofore.
E Lit-Law Game Called Off
Late last night, after the sports
page went to press, Coach Mitchell
phoned that the game between the se-
r nior lits and laws will not be played
today as announced on the sports page

The following letter was received
yesterday by President Harry B.
Hutchins: -
Dear Mr; President:.
Our country faces 'a possible cur-
tailment of food production due to a
shortage of farm labor-a shortage
that promises to increase as the sum-
mer advances.
May I urge that you bring this sit-
uation to the attention of the young
men in your student body with the
suggestion that, if possible, they spend
their summer vacations helping onthe'
farms? A considerable number of col-
lege men already mlake this a prac-
tice. This year there is special need
for such help on the farms, because
of the importance of maintaining a
normal production of food. I hope that
not only'students, but business men
generally, will lend aid,' as so many
of them did, patriotically and effective-
ly, in the summer of 1918.
ieports received by the United
States Department of Agriculture
show that the present supply of hired
farm labor is 15 per cent less than
last year and approximately 72 per
cent of the normal supply - which
was almost exactly the situation in
1918. The. farmers and their families
are doing their utmost to keep up
production, but they cannot secure the
hired help -that they formerly have
had. In consequence, the food sup-
ply may be measurably reduced unless
assistance is given. If within the next
fortnight the business men and stu-
dents of the country will declare their
readiness to aid during the coming
summer, farmers will be more likely'
to make normal plantings.
- Of course, one with little or no
farm experience should not expect to
earn as much at first as a seasoned
farm hand, but in a few weeks prac-
tically all men and boys who are
adaptable, alert, and strong should be
able to earn good wages in the har-
vest field. The demand for farm labor
has brought about a considerable in-
crease in the level of farm wages.
This increase, however, does not per-
mftthe farmer-employer to compete
(See Number 2, Page Six)

Inasmuch as the instructor is re-
garded as an "intellectual Nomad" on
the campus, according to the views
expressed at a meeting held Wednes-
day night of the Association of Uni-'
versity Instructors at the University
of Michigan, several plans were sug-
gested to better the situation of in-
structors here.
Discussion{ took place on the possi-
bilities 'of employment elsewhere,
both in coamercial and educational
lines, and a movement was started to
investigate such positions.
Low Salaries Mean Young teachers
Several suggestions were made, one
being that the instructor find out from
the head of his department just what
his chances for the future are, and it
was also stated that there should be
a greater spirit of frankness between
the individual instructors and heads
of departipents. . -
At the present low rate of salaries
it was shown that the University is
unable to get men of much teaching
experience and that young men are
secured who have not done much re-
search work. These men are then
given so much teaching work' to do
that research work is out of the ques-
tion.
May Start Investigation
The matter was also brought up con-,
cerning the enfranchisement of in-
structors and a plan was suggested
that an instructor after three years'
service be given a vote on faculty
matters, as it was pointed out that
after 10 years the former instructors'
are the men who are then running
the campus.
It was reported that certain profes-
sors on the campus are in favor of an
investigation being held regarding the
amount o'teaching work done by the
instructors, for they feel that the bulk
of the teaching is being donie by in-
structors and so are in favor of some-j
thing being done to stabilize the in.
structor group. -
One of the men stated that he ex-
pected to see the staff In his depart-
ment made up of women next year
due to the difficulty in obtaining men.

SHOW TIES IN BOTH JUNIOR
AND SOPH LITS FOR COUNCIL
Final count on the All-campus elec-
tion held last Wednesday shows a
total of 3,188 votes cast, which makes
this year's election the heaviest ever
held. The total repregents a vote*of
about 300 from women and'2,900 from
men.
Ties were reported 'in the junior
and sophomore lit Student council
candidates, and unless there is a pet-
ition for recount, class elections will
be held to decide the winners.
Completed Count Given
Following are the results of those
races in which final returns had not
been received when Thursday's Daily
went to press.
SAngus Gotz, '22M, and Robert J.
Dunne, '22, were elected Student coun-
cilmen at large with large majorities.
Class and department Student coun-
cilmen elected were the following:
Gerald A. Harrick, '21L, John C. Cary,
'22L, George Duffield, '21, Joseph A.
Avery, '21, Fitzhugh Brewer, '21, with
Edward S. Kingsford, '21, and Donald
J. Thorp, '21, tied; Hugh E. Wilson,
'22, Thornton W. Sargent, '22, with C.
M. Atkinson, '22, and Renaud Sher-
wood, '22, tied; Clarence N. Johnston,
'21E, Calvin G. Wetzel, '21E; George
E. Gregory, '22E, Howard H. Battin,
'21,A, Robert W. Christie, '22,' Elmer
W. Christie, '22D, Elmer. J. Traut, '21P,
Howard H. Harpst, '21H, and William
M. German, '21M.
Other Organization Votes Counted
Students' Christian association vice-,
presidents elected were: , Guy S.
Shoemaker, '21E, Clarence" N. John-
ston, '21E, Alan F. King, ex-'20E, Le
Grand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, Oswald
Michelmann, '22, Leon E. Grubaugh,
'22, and Donald J. Porter, '21.
Oratorical association officers not
previously announced are: William
H. Messinger, '21, treasurer, and Olive
N. Smith, '21, secretary, and these del-
egates: Carl G. Brandt, '22L, David
A. Watts, '21, Edward T. Ramsdell,
'23, Earl F. Boxell, '21, .Leland Galt,
'22, Donald Scott, '22, Harold H.
Warner, '21E, and Gladys R. Bough-
ton, '22.

Will Meet at 9:15 Saturday
For Last Issues; Tennis
Must Be Worn
Once again the question a
acy among the underclasse
decided through the tug-of
test this afternoon and the
race and rope contest, whic
held Saturday morning. The
in the tug-of-war will sta
o'clock this afternoon at
street bridge.
Assemble at 3:15
The sophomores will ass
3:15 o'clock at Waterman g
going in a body down State
then to the bridge. As is u
will carry the rope down v
but the contest will decide
carry it back. The, freshm
assemble at the same time
of the Library and will f
sophomores to the river
ther south bank in the first
The names of the men select
sophomore heavyweights a
man teams in the contest
below.
Pen was aroused in the ft
mores who turned out for
ing yesterday afternoon to a
defeat of last fall by Rosw
'21E. F. C. Bell, '21L, also a
ing that if the whole sophon
would turn out with the sa
that those at the meeting
there would be no questio
victory for the class 'of
Velde, who is in charge of
games, explained them to
Tennis shoes must be worn
day's contests and detaile
tion for the rope contest, w
take the place of the bag ru
given in The Daily tomorn
ing. The freshmen class w
ble for these contests at 9:
Saturday morning at the a
and the sophomores at the
in front of Tappan hall.
will be taken $df the class i
tug-of-war after the contes
of both classes in their war
urday morning.-

The follow
act as officia
are: C. Sho
McLouth, A. C
G. Prather, 1R
H. Stoser, N.
Bell, R. Arm
bell, D. Thor
Baxter, E. L
Rourke, C. 1vi
VanBrunt, T.
Grindley, R.
Wait, P. Eato
Earl Cress. I
er, J. Frey,
J. Edwards,
Mack, C. Clar

Br,

, F.
, R.
G.

ry, J

t
,,

Cosmapolita.ns To
Give Banquet
With President Harry Burns Hutch-
ins as the guest of honor, the Cosmo-
politan club holds'its annual banquet
at 7, o'clock Saturday night in the
Union. A program has been arranged
with speeches by President Hutchins,.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, Abraham El-
kind, grad. president of the men's
chapter, and Margaret Rothschaefer,
'23M, president of the- women's chap-

The sophomore heavyweig
will consist of the following
W. A. Mason, D. A. McCallh
Clark, D. M. Antrim, L. B.
H. Adams, E. L. Stephenso
Lawrence, C. Osborne, D. A..
D. Warner, L. F. Meilande
Schenck, P. C. Ackerman, G.
meron, R. R. Hanann, H. I
man, C. E. Butler, D. ,S. Lii
(See Number 1, Page S

ter.'

' I

An effort is being made to secure
President-elect Marion L. Burton as
one of the speakers, but it has not

at Kansas
Kansas, which
one of the most

SENIORS MUST SIGN UP
FOR INVITATIONS TODAY
Chairman H. G. Sparks requests se-
nior engineers to sign up. for invita-
tions before noon today, as this will
be the last chance given. Due to an
error, it will be necessary for those
who signed up last Wednesday to sign
again today.

been definitely learned whether or
he will be in attendance.

not

CAPS AND GO
In accordance
Michigan's olde
members of the
ing classes wil
Spring games att
- gown. That the 1
graduating senior
and gowns may
the annual gan
them more charac
Michigan spirit
the committee in
games is urging I
comply as a bod
1 quest.

WNS

Will Form Farm , Labor Bureau
Ann Arbor chamber of commerce
will'act as a clearing house for farm
labor this year. Shortage of farm
labor and the necessity of placing men
wishing work on farms as rapidly as
possible 'is given as the reason.

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