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May 13, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-13

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during the Univer-
Publications.
D PRESS
tied to the use for
oit or not otherwise
dished therein.
Michigan, as second'

street.
signed, the sig-
n" evidence o

ed after 8 o'clcck

M: CAREY

Early' in the spring, when the ground 'was still
hard and old paths made their appearance from un-
der the snow, there might have been some excuse
for doing some absent-minded crosscutting. But now
that "Keep to the Walk" has been dinned in our
ears and preached to us for months; after grass has
been planted and ground plowed up in an attempt
to bring the campus back to the beauty which it
could boast before the building stage set in; after
the buildings and grounds department had issued
every kind 'of warning from the printed notice to a
threat of fencing the campus off in iron railings
- after and in spite of all these considerations,
there is still a deaf-and-blind society whose mem-
hers regularly, every day, plod on over new grass,
over, newly seeded ground, without regard for the
appearanie of the campus of the University.
All kinds of plans have been suggested, froh
that of presenting every heedless crosscutter with a
tag of the "'Lost Motion" club to' the suggestion of
making every student sign a pledge to keep 'to the
walk. College students ought not to have to be re-
minded again and again of the results of such a
habit. The actions of those who continue to use
the Lawns for their, peregrinations seem to argue
one of two things :"either the offenders are lacking
in every-day; ordinary common sense,.or else they
care nothing whatever for the good of Michigan.
Keep Off the Grass!
AN APPEAL
A successful boycott is not accomplished in a
*day. Neither is it easily rendered effective. It is,
a task that involves sacrifice, not for a day or a
week but for a period of time which 'continues un-
til the price of the. articles boycotted is appreciably
lowered.
Two weeks have passed now since -we. gave the
old clothes movement its initial impetus. No doubt
there was not a man nor woman on the campus who
did not intend at that time to do his or her part to-
ward making the movement a success. But, the
question arises, is it a success? Will it continue to
have as strong a. hold on students as it had during
the first few days?
Entirely too many of us hold to the attitude
which says, "Oh, well, let the other fellow do it;
I ,have been wearing old clothes all this year. I
don't need to make any change." Such an attitude
.as this will never lower the 'price of clothes. What
is more, new suits are appearing on the campus
daily. Everyone seems to be mad with the desire_
to appear a little better than the other fellow. If the
"Old Clothes" movement is not given the undi-
vided support of every man on the campus we.can
predict only an' ultimate failure.'
Some fraternities -have given suppoi-t by mak-
ing the 'matter of formal dress optional at their
spring house parties. This is a step in the right direc-
tion, and we can never hope to attain our goal unless.
every student will thus sacrifice his own personal
interests in consideration of the common good.

TWO
STOREts

G RAH A M S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

Principles of Animal Biology

.
:;
___ t ________

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect May 18,'1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and' Express cars leave for
Detroit, 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. m. and
every two .hours to 8:40 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. m. and every two
two hours to 9:45 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55 a.m., 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 pm. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m.,, 12:25'a.m. and 1:10 a.mn.
Locals to Jackson - 7:45 a.m., and
12:10 a.m.
MAY
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 '10 .11 '12! 13 14 15
1617 18 19 20 21 22
23;24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 '4
Men-Hats are high; your last
season's hat cleaned and re-
Blocked into this season's shape,
with a new band, will look like
new and save you five or ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat 'Store, 617 4
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Asked At Randomi

I

'illul'

Just Received
Dr. Shull"'s

Al

Animal

At

UNIVEI
BOOK!
Display of Summer Millif

Friday and Satur

v'

- r, R A

"an

A Fine Line of Dress and Sp
STEVENS & PERSHII
618, Packard Street Near

ncerniag news for ay
rwho has full charge

be Monday
t, Thomas
Hitchcock ;
riday night,
Joseph A.

but

alled a few
d out. Lack
success of
ch an atti-
higan men.
most cher-
ie object of
ipants, but,
furnished
excess en-

I-'"

"Do you think the honor societies
on the campus accomplish what they
really shouldr'
George Rdgers, '21E, Webb and
Flange: "Outside of a few I can
not see where they accomplish any
definite end."
Martha Seeley, '21, Wyvern: "I
think that some of them, especially
the girls' societies, do accomplish!
their purpose. - The tendency is grow-
ing, however, toward too many honor-,
ary societies which will result in' de-
feating the purpose of a large num-
ber."
Roland F. Merner, '20L, secretary of
the senior law class: "In the main I
think they do not, but I think the so-
cieties in the professional schools are
doing more in this directi n than
formerly, and they have a function to
perform."
Gratton L. Rourke, '21, Sphinx:
"Those honorary societies who strive
for the ideals for which they were
founded, a bigger, better Michigan,
Justify their existence: I think there
are many which have 'lost sight of
this ideal and then again there are
many which have not."
Whittaker Raad Work Progressing
Work on the Whittaker road is pro-
gressing rapidly.
J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER
AND OPTOMETRIST
1.13 SOUTH *AIN STREET

TIhe Telescope'

i

The saving in rug wear alone will pay for
the TORRINGTON. It removes the
gritty, introdden dirt that cuts the fabric.
It brightens up the delicate colorings of
your expensive rugs and carpets and adds
years to their life. "Free demonstration.
WA SHTENAW ELECT
THE SHOP OF QUA!
Phone 273 20
INDE PENDENT T A
:PHONE 2701
Under New Management an
Ntw Cars - New Drivers -
Day Rates 35c per p
Vour Patronage Soil
A Trial Will, Convine
300 N. Main SI
C. R. BREININO

I

I

nthusiasm shown
can be expected
games will be

The co-ed who deigns to deep us company is a
very romantic young lady. So the other night she
remarked to us, "Wouldn't it be fine if we could
step to the phone and call back our happy high
school days?" And in our straightforward manner
we remarks, "I don't know; you probably would ex-
perience considerable difficulty with. the long di-'-
tance." An< then the silence conjealed around us.
The Latest Color in Rouge?
She was seated on a wicker-chair painted, grey,
-Photoplay Magazine.
The Retort Courteous
Landlady-What's the idea of coming to the
breakfast table with rubbers on.. It isn't raining
this morning.
Stude-Yeh, but the coffee looks pretty muddy.
Dear Noah: -
A lady acquaintance of mine has accused me
of trying to come between her and her fiancee' and
has threatened to pull my nose the next time she
meets me. What shall I do? Mary Wood..
Well, Mary, the only thing I see for you to do
is to soap your nose so that it will slip right through
her fingers.
As Others See Us
,Father, who is that solemn man
Who looks deprived of hope;
It is the comic editor
Who writes the Telescope.

U.

,..,.-;

.:..

:ut to establish a
Exactly what the
known as yet. But
zysically fit will be
form of athletics..
s would work out
ion. The student
would necessitate
be no doubt that
rsique of the aver-
her athletically in-
Sbe instituted.
continued through
[ year, and if the
classes should be
the benefit would

Here is, wher
purchase
HART SCHAFFNER

is,
44

,

SPRING
CLOTHING

i I

Heard on the Campus
Medic-Gee, I wish school were out.
Lit-Oh, I don't know. I kinda hate
going to work.

Don't you?
the idea of

You play safe here as we do
not misrepresent and sell only
clothing and furnishings of real
worth.
We are displaying the finest
styles in Straw Hats, Silk
Shirts, Neckwear, as well as
all other articles of men's wear.

: affected
need at-

as

suppose are be-
an impossibility
r some such sys-
versity should at
>wing that every
sical as well as

Foolish Question No. 23,435,654
The interurban car to Detroit had the usual num-
ber of people on it so that it was necessary to stand
on one foot to save space.
Conductor-Say, fellows, can you squeeze an-
other lady in there?
Chorus of students-I'll say we can.
S
Famous Closing Mines
"A catch question," he muttered as he heard the
bleachers ask, "Will that fielder muff it?"
NOAH COUNT.

REULE, C
HOME OF
S. W. CORNER

Al

Copyright 1920 Hart Schaffner

LT

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