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May 11, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-11

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Univer.

to the use for
or not otherwise
ed therein.
higan, as second
street.

the sentimentex -
eived after 8 o'clock

M. CAREY'

ence. That some of us drift away from the cus-
toms of going-to church and maintaining our for-
mer religious affiliations is due principally to the fact
that our social. surroundings change and we wish
to "go with the crowd." The Union services em-
body a practical movement to take advantage of
this very natural human impulse by so populariz-
ing Sunday services that the crowd will be going
there instead of to the places of amusement. This
is not done by any so-called "popularizing" methods
sich as serving lunches or providing movies, but in
a way which the intelligent college student respects:
'througlh the securing by the committee of the most
prominent speakers who can be brought to Ann Ar-
bor to speak on religious subjects. Few are the
students who will not respond to that kind of ap-
peal.
If Michigan wishes to witness a renaissance of
the sort of religion which most of us would like to
experience, we should get behind the Union serv-
ices with the weight of our opinon and the exam-
ple of our attendance.
CO-EDS AT HARVARD
Co-education at the Vniversity!. What delightful
.vistas our inaginations open at these words ! The
transformation of that dull class in Paleontology 37
X when-you discover the delightful blonde two seats
to the left to have a most ingratiating smile. We
can. picture the amorous flirtations between Fresh-
men in Psychology. A, ripening four years
later into a romantic. courtship between fellow
classmates in the "Education of the Child." With
beatific dreams of languorous "co-eds," we wonder
why we have failed to welcome women students
long, long ago.
But Alas! It can never be! The new school of
pedagogy may allow. women pupils, but Whe feel sure
that the College Will never be subject tq the femin-
izing sway. That timid idea, so tentatively proposed
by the Governing Board will not be adopted at Har-
vard. The stern spirits of every Puritan from Miles
Standish to Cotton Mather arise in solemn protest.
We, see the inventor of the original "New England
conscience" deliver his fateful warning.-Never.
The drear halls of Sever shall not be made frivi-
lous. Nor shall they invade the awful precincts of
"Mem." For this. is your God: Education. And
Education is austere. Else it were not Education.
Amen.
The dream fades. Regretfully we admit that the
Fathers are right. But what a pity!
-The Harvard Crimson

Shaw's Approach to Business
AT

TEXT BOOKS

TWO
STORES

HAM'S,
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

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ing news for any,
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1920.
heduled for Tues-
ck Wednesday aft-

FRESHMAN ATTENDANCE
Attendance to the freshmen talks and class meet-.
ings h'aE been very small, particularly in the college
of. Engineering.
The faculty has gone to the trouble to plan a series
of worth while lectures. In the Engineging col-
lege these talks, have given a general survey of the
main types"of engineering. No freshman is quali-
fied to choose a life profession without knowing
something of the work done in that profession, and
of those bordering upon it. Yet the attendance hasm
been very small.
There are but two more meetings planned for thei
freshman engineers. Non-attendance is not only a
loss to the freshman, but a discourtesy to the,
speaker Be there!

. DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect May 18, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and: Expresscars leave for
Detroit, 6:10 a. mn. and, hourly to
9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:40 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:45.a. m. and every two
two hours to 9:45 p. m.
Locals to Detr9it--5:55 a.m., 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 p.m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson - 7:45 a.m., and
12:10 a.m.
Asked At Rnandomn
"Have you any particular reasons
for' bteleving that Hill auditorium
should be open for political speech-
esrP
Robert B. French, '21, assistant bus-
iness manager of the Students' Di-
rectory: "I believe in anything which
will give the students a chance to ex-
press freely their personal opinions
and hear unbiased discussions. A
wider scope will be introduced into the
University if this is done. It will also
stimulate students to be more inter-
ested in politics as they were in by-
gone days"~
Laura E. Snyder, '21, secretary-elect
of the Unversity Y. W. C. A.: "There
are a good many reasons why this
should be adopted, but not, however,
for campaigns.: Unbiased political
issues should be discussed by promin-
ent men and students, thus affording
other a chance to gather together and
hear the questions of the day discuss-
ed. The building .is not being used
for anything In particular, and we
should avail ourselves of every oppor-
tunity to hear the big men of the
country."
Herbert G. Kamrath, '21E: "There
is no ,other place large enough to
handle the crowds who would desire
to hear men discuss political ques-
tions, so I would favor Hill auditor-
ium's being used for this purpose. If
the building is opened for political
speeches, it will tend to broaden all
the students who attend the meetings.
I don't believe there will be much
doubt as to how the' students feel
about this after the ballots are count-
ed in the campus elections."
Robert 'Gray, '23: "I thing Hill au-
ditorium should be opened for politic-
al speeches because it will tend to
make the students 'more interested in
future polities, widen their knowledge
of important issues, and give them a
good opportunity to exercise their abil-
ity to 'separate the wheat from the
chaff,' that is, decide which of the
various sides of different questions
they believe in."
INCOMES LARGELY DEPENDENT
UPON A MARKET-PROF.FRIDAY
Going farther into the field of econ-
omic problems,, Prof. David Friday
gave his second address before the
freshman assembly Monday afternoon
in Hill 'auditorium.
His talk co red the technique of
institutions in this field and the work
of the social sciences.
"Incomes are largely dependent
upon a marIket," he stated. "It is in
this market that one sells what he
has to offer, and in most instances
this is personal service, the varying
value of such .service accounting for
differences in income."
Professor Friday talked further on
the inheritance tax, and state income
taxes, bringing up the point of the
possibility of an increase in the form-
er.

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which always
social change
the movement

s and blasphemous.
in altering the mas-
that man's superior-
light of day and ex-
Jity, rather than the
heretofore. At any
'at present iniclining
tain, at least, that the
men of .a consider-
ility which they have

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The Telescop e

I

1

I

'nvention of the Women's Self Government
ation, held in Ann Arbor recently, has
A interest here; in the efficient form which
ioveenent of women is taking in the univer-
The purpose of the association is first of all
eation of a sense of unity and fellowship
woman: 'a class consciousness being pre-
ite to the effective carrying-out of its func-
The practical aim of the society 'which is to
yits organization is to promote.and maintain
ghest standards of university life, and to reg-
al matters of student -onduct not falling un-
e direct jurisdiction of the faculty.
to its performance, the society through the
n's League has already thoroughly demon-
Iits capacity for fulfilling these worthy inten-'
Its function in our own University has been
nt force in favor of student welfare. Far
regarding this evidence of feminine advance-
with apprehension, even the most determined
ents to. any apparent aggression by women
hank the exponents of this association for the
L1 good -which they have accomplished. In
;pect, at least, the feminist movement brings
rd aid of a sort that we ,cannot afford to dis-
ARRY ON THE UNION SERVICES
e weeks ago the Y. M.' C. A. called in con-
e about fifty of the leaders among the junior
showed them the success already attained by'
iversity Union religious services, and pointed
them the necessity for their assistance and
;hip in carrying on the services next year. The
se at that time proved the hearty endorse-
which the student body feels is due this re-
program, and the calibre of leaders .elected.
the 'services committee next year shoiuld
a guarantee of continued and increased pop-

The Daily Novelette
I
The gentle hush of twilight flooded the room
through the long French windows, and all was si-
lent save for the loud croaking of the crocusses as'
they thrust their sprightly heads through the tender
sod of the lawn. In the room sat a pensive trio,
Sylvester Diggs, his pretty wife and the handsome1
Sir Phymphrey Heater.r
II
Before Sir Humphrey's vision swam the picture
of the bounteous repast which-he had just arisen
from, still unsatisfied. And yet convention dictated
that he should stffer the pangs of hunger rather
than appear as a gormandizer. Rut the empty feel-
ing at the pit of his stomach was forgotten as he
gazed at his..hostess. He wondered if she had for-
gotten. Could that ardent look that she was be-
stowing on him mean that after all these years she
still cared'? At this junture Sylvester Diggs arose
with all the languid ease of a telephone operator
and remarked that he was going down below to
throw another asbestos log on the fire.
III
After a moment's awkward pause Sir Humphrey
dared to look at her. A look of understanding bor-
de'ring almost on the wistful was engraven on hex
countenance. A feeling cf exultation swept over
him as he felt that at last he had found appreciation
and understanding. At last when the long silence
had become unendurable she cast a furtive glance
to see that her husband was not in sight and then
whispered softly, "Now's your chance, Humphrey."
For a nioment he fought down the impulse to do
this thing. But he was powerless to resist this aw-.
ful temptation and with a sheepish look on his face,
he sneaked back to the dining rom and finished the
remainder of the real. J. W. K.
Pantous Closing iVnes
"A striking remark," he muttered as he saw the
stude haul off and say, "Take that then."'
NOAH COUNT

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