100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1920 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'V

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 9, 1920.

UES' PRODUCTION

A

Students Drink
Heavily-Malted
M'ilk, Coca Cola
Kick Isn't There, But the Price Has
Gone Up Just the
Same.
(By Joseph A. Bernstein)
Students of the University of Michi-
gan are drinking heavily.
In the face of prohibition laws, both
state and federal, the taste for drink
is too much and the thirsty student is
succumbing to temptation.
It is true that students of the Uni-
versity are drinking heavily. Figures,
that never lie, tell a tale of consump-
tion that rivals that of pre-prohibition
days when you could get a drink for
the asking.
The high cost of living has brought
with it the high cost of drinking, yet
the student defies even this hazard and
will satisfy his thirst.
Gone 'Way Up!
Even though coca colas have ad-
vanced from five cents a glass, and
even though malted milks are bringing
the drug stores twenty and twenty-five
cents each, the students continue to
drink heavily. 1
Drinking, they have found, can be
done very efficiently, despite the fact
that the sizzling hot and powerful sen-.
sation of gin or whiskey is no longer
there' to make a pathway down one's
throat for the final wallop. Even the
wallop is missing in these new drinks,
yet the students continue to drink of
them heavily.
Spirits are lacking on the 'campus.
Both the Oliver Lodge kind and the
bind with the wallop. If you have the
kind with a wallop, every man is your
friend.. But if you haven't, said would-
be friend must satisfy himself with
the milder drinks that are served him
at the local soda emporiums.
But the lack of the kick, deters him
not. He continues to drink, kick or
no kick, and he drinks heavily.
Figures gathered at the various drug
stores and the Union soda fountain
bear out that statement.

UNION SERVI1
oF RELIGIO1
WILL BI(

MOTIAERS
(II. Hardy Heth)
Sometimes it is the faded things
that count-
The worn-out things, the whimsy,
fragile things-
Like tired eyes and grayish wisps
of hair

ST

Against your cheek,
Or else a shaky voice in some old
song,
Or thin, white fingers playing ivory
keys.

'Can
at Mic

I

The world is full of mothers!
They seek locked nurseries to lin-
ger in,
Handling our broken toys;
Lavender-gowned mothers and
Pais}ey-shawled mothers,
And mothers in darned gloves-
It is the faded things that count.

i

There are
world
They live

whom the

lights

1 y.

homeless

s folk in richIs

I

Till dreams subdue the b
tinseled light.
Sometimes it is the faded
that count!

laze of .I

CHURCHES TO -08 t
, 6imnftirnno nwhi'mhm~a

I

!/.

ew Lady :

,d

lay; and so thoroughly the aristocratic old
English women."
- Even small parts such as the ac-
tress friends of Lady Bantock, are
taken by talent well known on the
I by campus. "Some are Frances Maire,
rery '21, who played Yoto, in "Patricia
by Passes," and Mildred Henry, '22, who
day, had one of the leading parts n "Alice-
An- Sit-by-the-Fire." Other "actresses"
ac- are Gertrude Boggs, '22, Amy Loom-
>een is, '21, Frances Oberholtzer, '21, Fin-
di- ette Martin, '22, Christine Murkatt, '22,
"mer and Edelaine Rodin, '22.
aedy-

Thousands Imbibe!
Gallons of coca cola syrup number-
ing all the way up to the half century AT
mark are consumed at one fountain
alone each week. One thousand two
hundret drinks, it is claimed, is the
average weekly sale of that beverage S
at another. , er
If every man on the campus would chu
drink just one coca cola, a week, the mc
total would hardly measure up to what the
is considered by many as a conserva- Da
tive estimate of the glasses of "coke" ma
consume4A
The number mounts into the thou- gr
sandses rapidly that you'd almost las
think that all coca cola factories would "V
be kept busier than a bunch of bees, mu
keeping Ann Arbor alone, supplied. grc
Then there are malted milks to be 12:
taken into consideration. From 30 to Pr
60 pounds a week; mixed with gallons "Di
of nilIk are required each week to min
satisfy the demand one soda fountain cu.
reports. The sale of this drink at one uni

PPROPRIATE SE J3l
P'LANNKED BY
ISTERS.

IN-

Services in commemoration
s -day will be held in
urches this morning, while

in P

about
deline
i-pro-
Thea-
a mar-
r own

arch'

WILL TEACH CITIZENSHIP
Michigan Faculty Members to Instruct
Women of Detroit
Members of Michigan's faculty will
figure prominently in the course of
citienship which the League of Women
Voters will offer to the men and women
of Detroit during May and early June.
The classes, which are to be held
every Friday afternoon in the Detroit
twentieth Century clubhouse, will con-
sider phases of local, state and federal
government and their relation to the
citizen.
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the political
science department, is scheduled to
address the course on May 14, his sub-
ject concerning "Michigan Govern-
ment." "Municipal Government in
Michigan" will be explained on May
21 by Prof. Robert' T. Crane, also of
the political science department.
Further announcement by the De-
troit League of Women Voters\ con-
cerning the program is expected to
bear the names of other members of
the faculty in the University.

F'aith?"
3 of the

6rvic,

be no

eak

State street drug store, popular be-
cause of its advantageous location,
numbers into several hundred and
sometimes over a thousand a week.
And More, and More
Then there are the .other drinks:
Grape juice, Appleju, Phosphates, and
your' specialties.
Sometimes we wonder where the
money comes from to pay. for it all.
Yet the students of the University
of Michigan continue to drink heavily.

ing of the Congregational Student's ine s
club. comri
Communion will be celebrated this sity
morning in the Presbyterian church, with
with reception of new members. Prof. as sc
Henderson's Student Bible class meets
at noon. Regular Christian Endeavor Ti
devotional services at 6:30 o'clock, to ix
preceded .by a social half hour. dent
"The Mothers of Yesterday and To- inter
day" will be the topic of Rev. J. M. the
Wells' sermon in the Baptist church decid
this morning. In the evening, the Bap- Sund
tist Guild will unite in the University A fe
union services in Hill auditorium, they

'ship a

'21, Isa
Rockwell,

by

SIX MICHIGAN LAWS GAIN
ADMITTANCE TO STATE

BAR(

Lady

have lasted
. no less.

are difficult
able work is
Stevens, '21,
'21, as 'the
of Lord Ban-
two old la-
"so patrician

Six members of this year's graduat-
ing class of the Law school have been
admitted to the bar b ythe circuit court
of Washtenaw county. These men are
George H. Kretyschmar, Alexander S.
Montague, Raymond A. Butler, Morris
D. Campbell, Clifford M. Toohy, Sel
Toohy, Selwynn A. Lamnbert.

Professor Studying Birds
Prof. Norman Wood, curator of
in the museum of zoology, lef
Wednesday for Berrien. Prof.
will spend the summer completih

I

ing th
state.

A

A

.i v

I

Both
TWO STORES

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan